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Anatoly Karpov vs Garry Kasparov
"Rated G" (game of the day Mar-26-2011)
Linares (1993), Linares ESP, rd 10, Mar-09
King's Indian Defense: Saemisch Variation (E86)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: Picture from this game:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B3jCUDl...

Jun-22-15  RookFile: Karpov was right about the promotion. Making the move correctly was Kaparov's problem. The fact that another queen was not instantly available should have been his problem, not Karpov's.
Jul-05-15  SpiritedReposte: More like rated X! Just nasty play from Kasparov.
Sep-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <14...b4!> When playing dxe5? it was rumoured that Karpov missed this. Kasparov was more to the point: <"Did he expect me to resign?"> !!
Sep-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Notagm: How about 18Qxb4, not only winning a pawn, but more importantly, putting the Queen on a better square>

The tactical justification of the second pawn sacrifice is based on hard-to see- moves, <18...c5! 19.Bxc5 Nxc5!>


click for larger view

which is a -again- puzzle in itself.

Sep-16-15  Rookiepawn: <Notagm: How about 18Qxb4, not only winning a pawn, but more importantly, putting the Queen on a better square>

The problem seems to be the lost of control on e3, a jump of the BN there would threaten too many things: the WR on e1 and c2. That's why W tries to get rid of it first with 18. h3.

Feb-27-16  yurikvelo: 14.f4? - decisive Karpov mistake.
15.Nb1? only shortened lose

full game multiPV: http://pastebin.com/5q9bhvXv

<How about 18Qxb4, not only winning a pawn, but more importantly, putting the Queen on a better square> 18. .. Ne3! and white cannot prevent Nc2+ "fork":
19. Rd2 Nc2+ 20. Rxc2 Rxc2
Black have R vs NP.
Furthemore black force exchange of black Bishop (at a6) for white Rook h1. Estimated is +M39

Dec-02-17  Saniyat24: One of the best puns, for sure...!
Dec-02-17  Saniyat24: ha ha 19.Qg1...only Karpov can think of this...!
Dec-02-17  Howard: For the record, Inside Chess stated back in 1989 that Karpov knew "how to use the first rank better than anyone--past or present".

Whether his 19.Qg1 move is a valid example of that, may be debatable though. But I can recall at least several instances of Karpov making a strong first-rank move.

Game 9 of Karpov-Spassky is a very typical example! Remember how he retreated a knight to b1 in that game ?!

Dec-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: How about L Christiansen vs Karpov, 1993?
Dec-02-17  Howard: You may be overlooking one little thing...it was Christiansen who effectively utilized the first rank in that game---it certainly wasn't Karpov!
Dec-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: You may be overlooking one little thing - irony.
Dec-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Interesting event in this game, and it turned into a <cg> Holiday Puzzle clue:

< " ... In this game Kasparov intended to play 24...cxd1=Q+ but without a second queen handy, he pointed to the black pawn and said "Ferz!" (Russian for the queen chess piece). According to some accounts, Karpov then cheekily played QxN, pointing to the pawn and saying "Slon!" (Russian for elephant, i.e. bishop). The clocks were stopped, and an arbiter quickly located a second queen. Karpov was given an extra two minutes as Kasparov's play was a technical infraction, but Kasparov won in a few more moves." >

(2017, #48)

Dec-21-17  WorstPlayerEver: Kasparov's play was not an infraction, though. It just makes clear that the FIDE are a bunch of jerks for not supplying a second Queen during a WCC.

Let's say Brasil plays the final against Germany, and they have to wait for a second ball for a while, when something happens to the ball in play.

It's completely ridiculous.

Dec-21-17  Olavi: <WorstPlayerEver: It just makes clear that the FIDE are a bunch of jerks for not supplying a second Queen during a WCC.>

When did the FIDE do that?

Dec-21-17  WorstPlayerEver: <Olavi>

I was kidding. Karpov had muffled the second Queen just after he realized what was going to happen.

Dec-21-17  Olavi: That's better ;-)
Sep-07-18  Caleb554: leka: I think you are not correct in your comparison of today's crop of players to that of older generations.

Radjabov beat Kasparov when he was 15 or 16. Carlsen drew with Kasparov and was seriously pressing him in a rapid game when he was 13. Computers have bought a lot more new possibilities into chess and the current generation of players are strongest ever because of that.

Carlsen,Giri, Caruana, So, Nakamura, Grischuk, Karjakin etc became grandmasters at a very young age ranging from 12-15. They were beating grand-masters before they got into their teens. Computers have made it possible to learn all the chess theory and strategy very very quickly. Something one got after decades of serious study is now readily accessible to all. In that sense Capa, Kasparov or Lasker or not stronger than today's players.

Even if they study and work very hard, I think they all would be rated in between 2750-2800, and it all depends on over the board play. It is not because they are not talented, but because chess players today, can see and understand 100's of positions within a few hours, can try many different opening ideas. In the good old days, people studied a position for lot more hours and days.

Dec-10-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < RookFile: Karpov was right about the promotion. Making the move correctly was Kaparov's problem. The fact that another queen was not instantly available should have been his problem, not Karpov's. >

This would make a great cartoon in a chess book annotating the game while relating the story... ♔asparov stands up and announces..
"A ♕ueen! A ♕ueen! Half my ♔ingdom for a ♕ueen!"

Dec-10-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Karpov must have lost his kryogenic kool after 22...c3
Apr-12-19  Fanques Fair: 14-... , b4 !! is an incredible piece of preparation by Kasparov ! If White accepts the second pawn sacrifice there follows 15-Qxb4 , c5 ! , 16-Bxc5, Nxc5! and now if White takes Black's lady 17-Rxd8, Rxd8! the threat of any of the knights playing the fork Nd3+ forces 18-Nc1 , Bf8! , with White underdeveloped and his Queen harassed with gains of tempo : 19- Qb5, Ba6 !, or 19 - Qb6, Bb7.


click for larger view

Apr-12-19  Granny O Doul: <Kasparov's play was not an infraction, though. It just makes clear that the FIDE are a bunch of jerks for not supplying a second Queen during a WCC> A strong event, for sure, but this was not a WCC.
Jul-30-19  The Boomerang: Caleb554

"sen,Giri, Caruana, So, Nakamura, Grischuk, Karjakin etc became grandmasters at a very young age ranging from 12-15. They were beating grand-masters before they got into their teens. Computers have made it possible to learn all the chess theory and strategy very very quickly. Something one got after decades of serious study is now readily accessible to all. In that sense Capa, Kasparov or Lasker or not stronger than today's players.

Even if they study and work very hard, I think they all would be rated in between 2750-2800, and it all depends on over the board play. It is not because they are not talented, but because chess players today, can see and understand 100's of positions within a few hours, can try many different opening ideas. In the good old days, people studied a position for lot more hours and days"

So that group of players if playing in the 80s and 90s would be equal to Kasparov?

You said they are even stronger. But let's think relative strength and ability. Not absolute strength with the added elo from todaya super computers.

Id say none of them would equal Garry except for Carlsen.

Aug-27-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: The arrangement of White's pieces after 22...c3 is mind-blowing; hard to believe they belong to Karpov. Had I the White pieces, would have played until checkmate. The game's lost anyway, and the mating patterns are rare and amazing.
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