chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing


register now - it's free!
Emanuel Lasker vs Harry Nelson Pillsbury
St. Petersburg (1895/96)  ·  Russian Game: Classical Attack. Chigorin Variation (C42)  ·  0-1
To move:
Last move:

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 56 times; par: 45 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 13 more Lasker/Pillsbury games
sac: 19...Nxf3 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: All games have a Kibitzer's Corner provided for community discussion. If you have a question or comment about this game, register a free account so you can post there.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with the default chess viewer, please see the Pgn4web Quickstart Guide.

Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-02-03  Kenkaku: Pillsbury's amazing combination begins on move 17. If Lasker had not played 21. Qd1 then 21...Qh3+ 22. Ke2 Re8. The combination ends with 24...Nxd3. An overall superb tactical game.
Apr-18-05  iron maiden: Pillsbury's first victory against Lasker, and a good one too. Lasker gets an uncomfortable position out of the opening and Pillsbury never gives him another look in.
Nov-15-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Check out the pawn structure at the end of this game. Pillsbury has two 3-pawn pawn islands while Lasker has 4 isolated pawns.
Nov-26-07  Ulhumbrus: After 12...Ng5, White does not have his QN on d2 already. as in the game

Capablanca vs B Kostic, 1919

so White lacks time for Bxg5 followed by Re6 and Rae1.

Instead of 14 Qc2, 14 Nd2 prepares to double Rooks on the e file.

Nov-19-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Winston Smith: I don't understand 5.d4, why wouldn't he want to kick the knight out of the center with 5.d3?
Nov-20-09  Buttinsky: I think White plays d4 rather than d3 for better piece mobilization, which is somehow worth allowing the knight on e4.
Jul-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: Here is a visual description of part of this game based on reports by the <New York Daily Tribune> on December 14, 16, and 28:

<Pillsbury made his moves with a slow, deliberate case that astonished the crowd of spectators. Suddenly, after Lasker's I 11.Bf4, all of Pillsbury's apparent lethargy vanished, and with a grand sweeping motion picked off Lasker's knight with a snap, and began playing with such speed as to show that lie had analyzed through to victory. Lasker seemed to become bewildered by his opponent's tactics, and was unable to prevent Pillsbury from bringing about a brilliant combination that forced the game shortly.>

Jul-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: This was Pillbury’s surprise opening, having never played it before in tournament or match play. It stood him in good stead; during his career, he scored eight wins, four draws and seven losses as Black, and scored one win and two losses against it.

His results inspired other American players, such as Marshall and Kashdan to adopt this opening.

His wins included such players as Lasker, Tschigorin (twice), Charousek, W. Cohn, H. Wolf, and Delmar.

His losses included Steinitz (twice) Maroczy, Eisenberg, W. Cohn, Mieses and Showalter.

His draws included Steinitz, Lasker, H. Wolf, and Teichmann.

As White against it, he defeated Schlechter but lost to Marshall and Teichmann.

Aug-24-11  cloutier: stunning!
Jan-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: The Petrov is a good opening. Black gets that e4 pawn off the board early. He is certainly fighting for the center, and that c8 bishop comes right out and finds good work to do.
Jun-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  SimplicityRichard: <RookFile: The Petrov is a good opening.>

I never contemplated playing any opening reputed to drawishness or dullness for that matter. I somewhat reluctantly took up the Petrov as I began to coach youngsters and encouraged them to respond to 1.e4 with ..e5 as a way of introduction to open games. I myself never bothered with ..e5 and began straight with the Sicilian. My advice and recommendation to the learners was simple; the Petrov avoids tonnes of study against Ruy Lopez, Giuoco Piano, Scotch, Vienna, Four Knights etcetera.

Amazingly, I am winning just as many games with the Petrov as I do with the Sicilian Kan and Dragon. I am simply stunned and in-love with the Petrov.

The Petrov is simple, solid - hard to break down yet in some variations explodes into Kingside attacks against the White King. I have a penchant for Kingside attacks. It's a great understated and unfairly maligned opening. And it's tendency to draw is I suspect only at the highest levels.#

Jun-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <SimplicityRichard>, have many people played 4.Nxf7 against you? I think that's a good move.
Jun-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: In my experience, and this may seem surprising, 4. Nxf7 leads to a draw more often than not, if both players know the opening.
Jun-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <RookFile: In my experience, and this may seem surprising, 4. Nxf7 leads to a draw more often than not, if both players know the opening.>

I think that is the same with me. I don't play the Petroff but when my opponents do, I bet they <hate> 4.Nxf7.!

As you say, it's only good enough for a draw... But there is a lot of chess between move 4 and move, say, 40.


from the Chessgames Store
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Russian, Classical. Chigorin Var (C42) 0-1 HP's 1st win over EL
from Barious Beauties & Bonehead BBQs Pre by fredthebear
Russian, Classical. Chigorin Var (C42) 0-1 HP's 1st win over EL
from P Ds to Open Flame Games by fredthebear
Selected 19th century games II
by atrifix
Game 40
from On My Great Predecessors 1 (Kasparov) by Qindarka
Combination in St. Petersburg
from Pillsbury's Greatest Games by Kenkaku
p99. Lasker succumbs to HNP's QNP sac
from Shamkovich: Modern Chess Sacrifice by setuhanu01
G168
from collection #1 by morwa
Harry Pillsbury's Best Games
by KingG
Russian, Classical. Chigorin Var (C42) 0-1 HP's 1st win over EL
from Game collection: -ER by fredthebear
TITANS vs. GIANTS
by laskereshevsky
Home Cooking
from Through the Years by parisattack
Statonc's opens
by Statonc
Pillsbury vs World Champions Decisive Games
by visayanbraindoctor
ipap's favorite games
by ipap
pillsbury's best games of chess
by bengalcat47
6... Nc6 7.0-0 Be7 8.Re1
from C20 Open Games by Olanovich
ffbc's favorite games
by ffbc
Russian, Classical. Chigorin Var (C42) 0-1 HP's 1st win over EL
from Knights Add Spice II by fredthebear
Selected Lasker
by LaBourdonnaisdeux
Nice combination
from Honza Cervenka's favorite games2 by Honza Cervenka
plus 14 more collections (not shown)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2016, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies