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Emanuel Lasker vs Harry Nelson Pillsbury
St. Petersburg (1895/96)  ·  Russian Game: Classical Attack. Chigorin Variation (C42)  ·  0-1
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Given 53 times; par: 45 [what's this?]

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sac: 19...Nxf3 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-02-03  Kenkaku: Pillsbury's amazing combination begins on move 17. If Lasker had not played 21. Qd1 then 21...Qh3+ 22. Ke2 Re8. The combination ends with 24...Nxd3. An overall superb tactical game.
Apr-18-05  iron maiden: Pillsbury's first victory against Lasker, and a good one too. Lasker gets an uncomfortable position out of the opening and Pillsbury never gives him another look in.
Nov-15-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Check out the pawn structure at the end of this game. Pillsbury has two 3-pawn pawn islands while Lasker has 4 isolated pawns.
Nov-26-07  Ulhumbrus: After 12...Ng5, White does not have his QN on d2 already. as in the game

Capablanca vs B Kostic, 1919

so White lacks time for Bxg5 followed by Re6 and Rae1.

Instead of 14 Qc2, 14 Nd2 prepares to double Rooks on the e file.

Nov-19-09  Winston Smith: I don't understand 5.d4, why wouldn't he want to kick the knight out of the center with 5.d3?
Nov-20-09  Buttinsky: I think White plays d4 rather than d3 for better piece mobilization, which is somehow worth allowing the knight on e4.
Jul-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: Here is a visual description of part of this game based on reports by the <New York Daily Tribune> on December 14, 16, and 28:

<Pillsbury made his moves with a slow, deliberate case that astonished the crowd of spectators. Suddenly, after Lasker's I 11.Bf4, all of Pillsbury's apparent lethargy vanished, and with a grand sweeping motion picked off Lasker's knight with a snap, and began playing with such speed as to show that lie had analyzed through to victory. Lasker seemed to become bewildered by his opponent's tactics, and was unable to prevent Pillsbury from bringing about a brilliant combination that forced the game shortly.>

Jul-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: This was Pillbury’s surprise opening, having never played it before in tournament or match play. It stood him in good stead; during his career, he scored eight wins, four draws and seven losses as Black, and scored one win and two losses against it.

His results inspired other American players, such as Marshall and Kashdan to adopt this opening.

His wins included such players as Lasker, Tschigorin (twice), Charousek, W. Cohn, H. Wolf, and Delmar.

His losses included Steinitz (twice) Maroczy, Eisenberg, W. Cohn, Mieses and Showalter.

His draws included Steinitz, Lasker, H. Wolf, and Teichmann.

As White against it, he defeated Schlechter but lost to Marshall and Teichmann.

Aug-24-11  cloutier: stunning!

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