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Larry Melvyn Evans vs Haakon Opsahl
"The World Turned Opsahl Down" (game of the day Jul-06-08)
Dubrovnik olm 1950  ·  Queen's Gambit Declined: Modern. Knight Defense (D51)  ·  1-0
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Given 4 times; par: 170 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-07-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <psmith: <al wazir> In your line 52...dxe4??? 53. Nxe4+ wins the Rook.>

Thanks. You're right. I found another way for white to win, with a genuine Zugzwang. But your way saves about ten moves and makes my line irrelevant.

<But better is 51...Rxh2 which deserves further thought...>

Black loses his N and then has to give up his R to stop the e-P from promoting. The only thing I can see going for him is the threat to promote his own h-P.

Jul-07-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Funny game-material is even,yest black is doomed. One pawn holds back two. Three cheers for the white d-pawn!
Jul-07-08  psmith: <al wazir> The h-pawn is dangerous enough that it isn't clear Black will have to give up his Rook for the e-pawn. For example: 45...Kf6 46. f3 Ra2+ 47. Kf1 Ra1+ 48. Ke2 Ra2+ 49. Kd1 Ra1+ 50. Kc2 Ra2+ 51. Kb1 Rxh2 52. e4 h4 53. e5+ Kf5 54. Rxe7 Kxf4 55. Nxf7 h3 56. Nh8 Re7 57. Nxg6+ Kxf3 58. Rf7+ Kg4 59. Rh7 h2 60. Rxh2 Rxh2 61. e6 Rh1+ 62. Kb2 (62. Kc2 Ra1 ) Rh2+ 63. Kb1 = (analysis aided by Fritz 5.32). Or, in this line, 58. e6 h2 59. Rh7 Rxe6 60. Ne5+ Kg2 61. Rg7+ Kf2 62. Ng4+ Ke2 63. Nxh2 Kd3 =
Jul-07-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <psmith>: Thanks. The only firm conclusion I can draw from all this is that 45...Kf6 was a reasonable alternative to 45...Kd6.

I agree with <TheBish>: It would be interesting to see what Evans or Chernev says. I'll look for their books.

Jul-08-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <TheBish, psmith>: Here's what Chernev says in _The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played_: "Black avoids 45...KB3 [45...Kf6], the reply to which might be 46. P-B3 [46. f3] followed by 47. P-K4 [47. e4] and 48. P-K5ch [48. e5+], with dangerous consequences."

Thanks, <Jim Bartle> and <nasmichael>, but this analysis doesn't exactly go deeply into the position or add a lot to our understanding. And Chernev never discusses my other suggestion, 29...Rg6+.

Jul-09-08  psmith: <al wazir> So, at present I am thinking that 45...Kf6 was a better move than that played in the game, 45...Kd6. I wonder whether there is any other analysis available?
Jul-09-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <psmith>: I've located a copy of the Evans book in a library, but it's 50 miles from here, so I won't be looking it up anytime soon.
Jul-14-08  patzer2: Apparently, 47. Nh7! wins a pawn with decisive advantage. Evan's subsequent play is instructive in demonstrating good Rook and Pawn and King and Pawn endgame technique.
Jul-14-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <Joshka: <Caissanist> Yes, he also annotates every move of this game in "American Chess Quarterly" Volume 3 Number 3, which I was just able to purchase thru Ebay. First time I have ever been able to get ahold of this chess magazine. It's about the size of Britain's "Chess" Magazine from the 80's. The issue I have also covers The US Championship of 1964.>

Wow, I should try to find this American Chess Quarterly Volume 3, Number 3 as well.

Jan-23-09  WhiteRook48: Nice pun. I'm still laughing
Feb-28-10  Eduardo Leon: In my immense patzerness, I looked at the final position for a few minutes and wondered why Black resigned. I saw 81...Ke7 (evidently not 81...Kg7 82.Ke6 and White snaps Black's queenside Ps) 82.Kg6 (White should not allow Black to play 82...Kf7) Ke6, and then only considered 83.e4??.

To redeem myself, I eventually saw the light: 83.f4 (Black can't use the hole in the light squares to get to e4, as he must retreat now) Ke7 84.f5!, and the Black f P is lost.

Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: A very instructive game.
Nov-17-10  frogbert: i've beaten one of these two players, with a nice piece sacrifice. :o)
Nov-17-10  frogbert: this game was played 45 years later - it probably was easier to beat opsahl in 1995 than in 1950 :o)


click for larger view

move 18: white moves and wins

ps. opsahl passed away several years ago and was a very old man in 1995.

Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: Nd5 looks good.
Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <frog> 1.Nd5<?>
Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: Odd how the c6 pawn, the focus of the "minority attack", wound up surviving to the end.
Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: Hmm, actually 1.Nd5 Qxd5 2.Bxf6 Qc5+ doesn't lead anywhere. I'll keep looking.
Nov-17-10  frogbert: yup. there was no good answer. opsahl tried taking the knight with the queen (Qxd5) but didn't get enough because the bishop on d7 hangs if he takes the rook after 18. Nd5 (threatening Nxf6+) Qxd5 19. Qg4+ Kh8 20. Bxf6+ Bxf6 21. Rxd5


click for larger view

here he tried Rg8 but I can return an exchange with Rg5 too, so he resigned 6 moves later, after my 28th move.

Nov-17-10  frogbert: shams, you forgot an important check, forcing the king to another unfortunate square. sorry for spoiling it, thought you'd seen it all when i posted the line. didn't see your second post.

i was rated around 1500 when i played this game, btw.

Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: Dammit, shams, combine your ideas. Nice stuff <frog>. Way to beat on the geriatrics. :)
Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <i was rated around 1500 when i played this game, btw.>

So you're saying I should give up chess?

Nov-17-10  frogbert: hehe. well, my rating kept going up - and norwegian ratings under 2000 are known for being way "too low" compared to say fide or uscf ratings - i.e. a norwegian 1500-player is typically 17-1800 fide, a 1700-player often around 1900, and 18-1900-players in norway typically around 1950-2050 fide (or higher). [i'm only just above 1900 in norway and almost 2050 fide, for example.]

only at around 2250 does fide-ratings and norwegian ratings seem to become approximately comparable. i've seen that people with fide-ratings typically get another 100 points added to their "ratings" if they want to participate in uscf rating category tournaments.

Nov-17-10  frogbert: <Way to beat on the geriatrics.>

opsahl appeared to be a very kind, nice man when i played him on his older days. the only trouble i had was during the post-mortem, when i felt that i was disturbing those in the room next door (still playing) the few times i spoke loud enough for opsahl to hear what i was actually saying. ["you must speak louder, i don't hear very well, young man."]

but you're right: i should show more respect towards the elderly.

Mar-05-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: i read in CL that this was GM Larry Evans' favorite game..
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