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Paul Morphy vs John William Schulten
New York m (blind) (1857)  ·  Italian Game: Italian Variation (C50)  ·  1-0
To move:
Last move:

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Given 215 times; par: 13 [what's this?]

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find similar games 14 more Morphy/J Schulten games
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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-16-02  bishop: The second player should not open up the game too quickly. Here Black's 4...f5 weakening the diagonal a2-g8 was met with the energetic 5.d4! opening up more lines versus the uncastled king.
Dec-16-02  mdorothy: Forgetting the pin.... hey, at least he was blindfolded when he missed it. I probably couldn't get even 10 moves into it blindfolded.
Dec-16-02  bishop: mdorothy, When Morphy plays a blindfoldgame he is the only one that plays without looking, not his opponent.
Dec-21-02  mdorothy: Ok, that makes it that much more incredible, and I guess it does make sense, considering how good he was.
Mar-24-04  HailM0rphy: He really makes it look that easy..and blindfolded..you cant tell me he isnt smarter then einstein
Nov-28-04  ArmyBuddy: Einstein couldn't play a lick of chess. He knew the rules. He just got beat too easily. You don't need to be a genius to play chess. You need a good memory and the will to win. That's all Bobby Fischer had and he is a high school dropout.
Aug-24-05  Jgamazo: Instead of 5. ... exd4? he should of played 5. ... fxe4! followed by Nf6, Bd6, 0-0, and d5.

The worst move was 6. ... d6?? this opens a direct line to the king. He could have tried Ne7, but the pieces are uncoordinated and the position is cramped.

Aug-24-05  RookFile: There may be some 'annotating by result' going on here. If black plays 9... Nd8, he has a defendable
position, with white enjoying his usual slight advantage. No quick victories anywhere in sight for white after this move.
Aug-24-05  paul dorion: <Jgamazo> 5...fxe4 looks suicidal after 6 Bxg8 exf3
7 Qxf3 Rxg8
8 dxc5 White is a pawn up and black stll has to defend h7 (Qh5+)
Aug-24-05  RookFile: I don't quite agree, paul. I think
black would be overjoyed to see white
take that pawn. Let's say he plays
8... d5, and instead of 9. cxd6 Qxd6
10. Qh5+ Qg6 11. Qxg6 white plays
instead 9. Qh5+ g6 10. Qxh7 and black
plays ...Be6. If white isn't careful,
black can castle queenside, and we find that the only thing Qxh7 does is commit sui-mate down the h file.

More principled is 6. Nxe5 with a clear advantage for white.

Aug-24-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Boomie: 5...fxe4 is suicidal because it does not address black's backward development.

5...fxe4 6. Nxe5 Nxe5 7. dxe5 d5

(7...Qe7 8. Bf4 (2.31/13))

8. Qxd5 Qxd5 9. Bxd5 Bd4 10. Bxe4 Bxe5
11. Re1 (2.27/13)

In fact 4...f5 is also a losing move. But Morphy missed the best line. Instead of 6.e5, an interference move, Ng5 is more forcing.

6. Ng5 Ne5 7. exf5 Kf8 8. Bxg8 Kxg8 9. Re1 d6 10. c3 h6 11. cxd4 hxg5 12. dxe5 Bxf5 13. Qd5+ Kh7 14. exd6 Bxb1 15. Qxc5 cxd6 16. Qd5 (1.80/13) with an easy win.

Aug-24-05  RookFile: Yes, and i thought 6. exf5 was also good. But, we can cut Morphy some slack, the guy was playing blindfold. However, it is a valid point to say,
just because Morphy won the game, doesn't mean every move of his is good, and every move by the losing side is black. Taking the position before move 9, for example, if black plays 9... Nd8, he has a perfectly reasonable game, with a long fight ahead.
Aug-25-05  Jgamazo: To <paul dorion> I was thinking about Bird vs Morphy, 1858 where the position was similar. But Morphy was black.
Aug-25-05  paul dorion: <Jgamazo> The Bc4 makes all the difference. Also , in the Bird-Morphy game White missed 6 Ne5 and 8f3 both leading to advantage according to ECO.
Aug-25-05  paul dorion: <rookfile> On taking the h7 pawn. Your comment gives the answer. To stop Qh5+ black has to play d5 opening up the game further to White's delight. Don't forget: Treaths are often stronger than their execution. After the queen exchange on g6 black is lost: Bg5 stops o-o-o and white will pick black weak pawns easely.
Jan-10-06  morpstau: Why did Schulton even bother to play the ChessGod? This game is a fresh example of how to punish rediculous moves such as f5??! I mean out of the 15 games between these two, did john henry schulton even win a bloody game? Its just pathetic to watch a waste of Paul Morphys time. He could have been watching and listening to opera!
Apr-10-06  McCool: That last move should be a puzzle one day.
Dec-09-07  krippp: <ArmyBuddy: Einstein couldn't play a lick of chess. He knew the rules. He just got beat too easily. You don't need to be a genius to play chess. You need a good memory and the will to win. That's all Bobby Fischer had and he is a high school dropout.>

I hope that's just a shoddy attempt at sarcasm, because otherwise it's one of the dumbest things I've ever heard.

Though, as you seem to have been inactive for years and probably won't be reading this, I won't bother to go on/explain any further. Just wanted to "break the silence" concerning your comment.

Mar-29-08  giovanygc: Even blind, Morphy didn't forget the natural weakness of f7 square.
Jun-19-12  LoveThatJoker: Guess-the-Move Final Score:

Morphy vs J Schulten, 1857.
YOU ARE PLAYING THE ROLE OF MORPHY.
Your score: 10 (par = 12)

LTJ

Jul-22-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ke2: Worst move is probably just 4...f5. I just checked the opening explorer and surprisingly this is the only instance of 4...f5.

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