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Viswanathan Anand vs Alexey Shirov
FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2000), Tehran IRI, rd 2, Jan-03
Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Neo-Archangelsk Variation (C78)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 6 times; par: 124 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-24-08  Youjoin: What a violent game!
Aug-05-08  just a kid: This was an entertaining game.Sort of a zugzwang position at the end.
May-23-11  SetNoEscapeOn: masterful
May-24-11  sevenseaman: Perfect opening, strong and realistic end game play.
Feb-15-12  WiseWizard: Much too forcing Mr. Anand.
Feb-15-12  gaatab: i think black had better move 15:n:c3,16:b:c3 qd5!...with good game.
Feb-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Fine endgame technique by Anand.
Feb-16-12  drukenknight: why isnt black's R behind the passed pawns? and 60...Ke5 looks wrong as he needs to keep those pawns under watch.
Nov-14-13  vsiva1: First chess win in a world title match for an Indian which eventually led to warrant him a WORLD CHAMPION IN THE HISTORY OF CHESS
Apr-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Game 2 of their 6 game match in the finals of the World Championship tournament; after a draw in game 1 Anand won 3 consecutive games to clinch the match. 7..d5 was a relatively new idea. 8 d4 is the main line; Anand's 8 a4 was a new idea. 11..Ng5 12 d4..Bxf3 13 Bxg5..Bxd1 14 Bxd8 would have been very good for White. Anand had calculated that he would have been better after 19..Rxe3 20 Qd4..Rxf3 21 gxf..Bh3 22 Re1..Qg6+ 23 Kf2..Qg2+ 24 Ke3..Re8+ 25 Kd3..Qxf3+ 26 Kc4..Bf1+ 27 Kc5. 28..Kg7 would have been more accurate. 33..Ke6? was a crucial waste of time; after 33..Ra7 Black would have had sufficient counterplay; ie. 34 Rh4..Ke5 35 Rxh7..f4+ 36 Ke3..Ra3+ 37 Kg4..Ra2. It was still not too late to play 34..Ra7 but when he did play it a move later it was too late to cut White's king off on the 2nd rank after Anand's 36 Kc3. Anand thought that Black's best chance would have been 39..h5 trying to break up White's kingside. 41 Kb5? (41 Kc5 or 41 c5 would have been better) Complicated White's task as after 43 Ka4 White's king was out of play. Still Anand was able to make progress and after 63 Rh7 with the idea of 64 g7..Kf7 65 h6 it was clear that the Black had no defense.
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