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John Cochrane vs Bonnerjee Mohishunder
Unknown 1855  ·  Gruenfeld Defense: Three Knights. Burille Variation (D94)  ·  1-0
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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-07-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: A Grunfeld (and a well-played Grunfeld) from 1855! Black lost the thread of the game with ...Qa5?! and ...Re8??, but up until then both players showed a pretty good understanding of how to play an opening which wasn't "invented" until about 70 years later.
Feb-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Let's rename the opening into Moheschunder -Indian! :D
Mar-18-09  blacksburg: very interesting, i never heard of this Moheschunder.
Mar-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <whiteshark> "Moheschunder-Indian" would really be redundant, since ALL the Indian defenses are named after Moheschunder. The earliest known use of the term "Indian Defence" was in 1884, at which time the name was attibuted to the opening's use by the Indian player Moheschunder Bannerjee against Cochrane. Chess Player's Chronicle, October 22, 1884, p. 172. http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/... Sergeant describes Moheschunder as having been as of 1848 "a Brahman in the Mofussil-up country, as we might say-who had never been beaten at chess!" Philip W. Sergeant, ''A Century of British Chess'', David McKay, 1934, p. 68. Sergeant wrote in 1934, "The Indian Defences by P-KKt3 coupled with P-Q3, or P-QKt3 coupled with P-K3, were largely taught to European players by the example of Moheschunder and other Indians, to whom the fianchetto developments were a natural legacy from their own game. The fondness for them of the present Indian champion of British chess, Mir Sultan Khan, is well known. But they are now so widely popular that Dr. S. G. Tartakover was able to declare, some years ago, that 'to-day fianchettos are trumps.' A sequel hardly to have been anticipated from the discovery of Moheschunder in the Mofussil!" Sergeant, pp. 68-69.
Mar-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: See <Calli>'s posts at Cochrane vs Mohishunder, 1848 for some more info.
Nov-14-11  lentil: 9. .. cd was an error, releasing pressure on the diagonal. (I say this from sad experience...)
Nov-30-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Wonderful finish in the inaugural Grunfeld Defense.
Feb-12-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: I suppose Black's problem was the Mohole on f7. Cochrane ingeniously used Ba3 to weaken that square by driving the Rook from f8, and suddenly we get a 'European' mating attack. The Ur-Gruenfeld deserved a better fate.

Mohishunder also played the Reverse Gruenfeld and Reverse Benoni as White, though some of his piece developments look awkward to modern eyes. Of course, we have a century or so of 'Indian' defences to learn from.

When things went his way, Mohishunder made Cochrane's Euro-Romantic bluster look naive.

Jul-05-12  LoveThatJoker: <14...Be6!?> would have been better than 14...Re8? for sure!

LTJ

Sep-06-12  BadKnight: I have put some perspective on the indian player's name from the view of a native speaker.
Sep-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: <BadKnight: I have put some perspective on the indian player's name from the view of a native speaker.>

Do you have a link for that, <BK>? I would be interested to see it. (It seems to me that the name might more properly be something like "Mahachandra," but I'm no Hindi/Sanskrit scholar, so am probably mistaken.)

Sep-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: It's on the player's page, <Abdel>

Bonnerjee Mohishunder

Sep-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: Ah. Thanks, <OCF>.
Sep-29-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < An Englishman: Good Evening: A Grunfeld (and a well-played Grunfeld) from 1855! Black lost the thread of the game with ...Qa5?! and ...Re8??, but up until then both players showed a pretty good understanding of how to play an opening which wasn't "invented" until about 70 years later.>

Why don't you take a hike. We don't pious know it all need a lecture from such as you.

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: < Richard Taylor: < An Englishman: Good Evening: A Grunfeld (and a well-played Grunfeld) from 1855! Black lost the thread of the game with ...Qa5?! and ...Re8??, but up until then both players showed a pretty good understanding of how to play an opening which wasn't "invented" until about 70 years later.>

Why don't you take a hike. We don't pious know it all need a lecture from such as you.>

Got up on the wrong side of bed?

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <<lentil: 9. .. cd was an error, releasing pressure on the diagonal. (I say this from sad experience...) >

I agree. Normally Black defers that move. Opening Explorer Database 2013 shows White getting a massive plus score (+13 =2 -0) after 9...cxd4?! 10.cxd4.

Nor was there any need to rush with 7...Nxc3. (White usually prefers 7.Bc4 to 7.Be2, precisely in order to try to provoke that move. Opening Explorer)

LoveThatJoker: <14...Be6!?> would have been better than 14...Re8? for sure!>

Yes. Then White would have nothing better than 15.Qb2 Rfd8, with a small advantage for White, since 15.Qxb7?! Qxa3 16.Rxc6 Qxa2 would allow Black to equalize.

Jul-01-13  Alpinemaster: @ <FSR>

Thank you kindly for the history lesson on the origin of the name "Indian Defense"; I had noticed that Bonnergee was playing these hyper-modern openings, but I did not realize that this was due to the nature of the archer in classic Indian chess. Really appreciated the Seargeant notation!

It doesn't surprise me that modern openings basically have their initial roots in this classic match; during the early 20th century, this match served as one of the greatest examples of classical long-term match play for Masters of all nationalities.


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