chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Rashid Gibiatovich Nezhmetdinov vs Yuri M Kotkov
17th RSFSR Ch (1957), Krasnodar, USSR
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. Rio Gambit Accepted (C67)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 21 times; par: 23 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 2 more Nezhmetdinov/Y Kotkov games
sac: 17.Nxc7 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: To flip the board (so black is on the bottom) press the "I" key on your keyboard.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-24-09  turbo231: <GreenFacedPatzer: I don't see how pieces will_block_other pieces when they're in a new position on the board> Brother I have the same problem. I don't know why I love this game so much!
Nov-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  sfm: <Eduardo Leon: <sfm>, the move you suggested... 21...Qg7
offers no serious resistance. After
22.Re8!
black's R and queen B effectively doesn't exist>
On that I had 22.-,Be6!
Nov-24-09  Stoned Knight: LOL, I am happy that I am not the only one who didn't see it. 1 1/2 stars? make 3!!!
Nov-24-09  Patriot: It didn't take long to see that 25.Re8+ wins by force, as white mates next move in one of two ways.
Nov-24-09  Patriot: <<al wazir> How can we learn to think like grandmasters if the grandmasters don't reveal their thinking???>

They do actually (e.g. "Think Like a Grandmaster" by Kotov), but to really be one you need to start out with a really good chess coach at a very young age and basically give up your whole childhood and become a chess fanatic!

Nov-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  sfm: <David2009 The on-line link below allows interested kibitzers to try to win the position against Crafty.> Ah! Nice. I tried that, but the best I could find was the draw after

25.d4,b5
26.Bd5,Rd8
27.f4,Bh4
28.Re7,BxR
29.QxB,h5
30.Qf6+,Hh7
31.Qe7+
with perpetual check.

Losing was easy!

Nov-24-09  Eduardo Leon: <sfm>, I hadn't seen 21...♕g7 22.♖e8 ♗e6!, but then 23.♗xf6 ♕xf6 (23...♗xd5 24.♗xg7+ ♔xg7 25.♖xa8) 24.♕xe6 and white is a pawn up.
Nov-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <al wazir: So what was Nezhmetdinov thinking on move 17?>

Here's the position, with white to play:


click for larger view

Now, I don't think that Nezh saw all the moves to the end of the game. I think he saw this sequence:

17. Nxc7 Qxc7 18. Qd5+


click for larger view

Now white threatens to pick up another pawn (and possibly the exchange) by 19. Bxd6, which forks queen and rook. Or on 18...Rf7 he gets to play 19. Re7, with all manner of threats along the seventh. Two pawns plus an attack seems a fair return for a knight, especially as black's queenside is so undeveloped.

Then when he got to 18...Kh8, my guess is that he thought again and decided to change his plan by infiltrating a rook to e8 and repositioning his black squared bishop to b2.

Then the rest of the attack sort of flows, with threat after threat, and not so much calculation needed.

Nov-24-09  smalldreams: I was doing chess puzzles for hours last night while bouncing my sleeping baby daughter so let's see if I've gotten any better...

25.Re8+ Qxe8
26.Qxf6#

25.Re8+ Bxe8
26.Qg8#

Looks good to me.
Time to check. :D

---yay!

Nov-24-09  wals: <Patriot> Gary Kasparov is coaching that young fellow Carlsen which must be an indication of his regard for the youth's ability.
Nov-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: The finish reminds me of a famous game:
Reti vs Bogoljubov, 1924

Simple enough, but Reti also had to see a coup on e8 several moves in advance. This is the position before white's last and winning move:


click for larger view

Be8!
1-0

Nov-24-09  VincentL: In this "easy" position white is a bishop down.

I did not see this instantly, but after quickly examining the options (there are not many), I see

25. Re8+

Now. 25.....Bxe8 26. Qf8 mate

if 25.....Qxe8 26. Qxf6 mate

This is obviously the solution.

At this time of the day I will be one of the last posters for this puzzle.

Nov-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <Once: . . . Now, I don't think that Nezh saw all the moves to the end of the game. I think he saw this sequence: 17. Nxc7 Qxc7 18. Qd5+ . . . white threatens to pick up another pawn (and possibly the exchange) by 19. Bxd6, which forks queen and rook.>

If 18...Kh8 19. Bxd6, 19....Nf6 is now strong. But after 19. Re8 (as in the game) Ne5, what does white do? If 20. Rxf8 Bxf8 or 20. Qxd6 Qxd6 21. Bxd6 Rxe8, black can apparently hold the position. If 20. Bxd6, then 20...Rxe8 21. Bxc7 Nf3+! 22. Qxf3/gxf3 23. Rxe1+, and black, with ♖+♖ vs. ♕+♙+♙ has a chance to survive.

<Then when he got to 18...Kh8, my guess is that he thought again and decided to change his plan by infiltrating a rook to e8 and repositioning his black squared bishop to b2.>

That would be my guess too, but it's only a *guess*. See, I have this revisionist theory that many of the brilliant combinations that we see here as puzzles are here not because GM Blastoff clearly saw the whole thing in advance, but because they succeeded. If they hadn't succeeded, <CG> wouldn't post them.

Nov-24-09  Patriot: <<wals>: <Patriot> Gary Kasparov is coaching that young fellow Carlsen which must be an indication of his regard for the youth's ability.>

Carlsen is definitely talented but that's not my point. I was half-way joking in my previous post, but there is some truth in it. Even if a kid shows a lot of potential at a young age, it usually takes a lot of coaching by a strong player to help them reach their full potential. And by then, they've devoted a lot of their childhood to chess--which is kind of sad in a way. It's not that I don't like chess, obviously I do, but childhood is something you don't get back and in my opinion a lot of it should be spent playing with other kids through physical activities.

Some chess is good but kids should be allowed to be kids!

Nov-24-09  Vicao: To David2009: Nice link, I managed to find a win starting with

25 h4 Bxh4
26 g3 Bg5
27 f4 d5
28 Bxd5 h6
29 Re3 Qd6
30 fxg5 Rf8
31 Qe7 Qxe7
32 Rxe7 Rd8
33 Bxb7 hxg5
34 Bd5

etc which should be winning for white (although I managed to let it slip to a draw quite often)

Nov-24-09  SufferingBruin: 1000 rating, trying to get better.

It took awhile but then I saw it: Re8+. The past few puzzles that I've seen have been very instructive--deflection and focusing on getting pieces off of key squares to open up an attack. After seeing that leading with the queen didn't go anywhere, I thought, "Where would the ideal square be for the lady? Can she get there?" And I got it.

On a sidenote: I swear, if Nezhmetdinov could start a game down a piece in exchange for space, he would do it.

Nov-25-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <al wazir> I am with you on this one. Computer analysis has shown that many classic games - the evergreens, immortals, etc - have huge errors in them, usually on both sides.

So I think we can discount the theory that Grandmasters routinely calculate very long lines. Unless the sequence is very forced, the possibilities are simply too great. Instead they use their intuition, honed over many games, to decide whether a position is good or bad for them.

And, as you say, history is written by the victors. So we tend to see the games where this semi-gamble pays off and the long-range sacrifice works.

I have a personal theory about sacrifices in chess. If I am playing someone graded below me, then I will allow myself a few small sacrifices - the odd pawn or two, compromised pawn positions, exchanges, that sort of thing. As long as I get a reasonably open and interesting position, I don't mind giving away some wood. Against lower graded players, this doesn't seem to matter as I reckon I will spot the tactics better than they will.

But this approach is a lot more risky - for me at least! - against higher graded opponents. They tend to grab all the material I give them, then defend stoically to an endgame where the extra material is ground down to a technical win. These are the games that don't get published, don't involve long calculation, and yet win the majority of times.

I think that is why NN is on the receiving end of sacrificial attacks far more often than stronger players. And why we can probably not put too much store in the idea of GMs calculating very long lines.

Nov-25-09  eaglewing: <Jimfromprovidence: My idea is this; 24...Bg5 25 f4 Bh4 26 g3 Qb6+ 27 Re3 d5>

I thought too about Qb6 and d5, but I think the problem arises in the line 24...Bg5 25 f4 Bh4 26 g3 Qb6+ 27 Kf1 d5 28. gh Qd4 (What else? dc Re7!) 29. Bxd5 Qxf4 30. Ke2 Re8+?! 31. Kd3 and it looks like the king can manoeuvre to safety via d4/c3/b2 (but I did not check with my Fritz).

Nov-25-09  Utopian2020: <Now white threatens to pick up another pawn (and possibly the exchange) by 19. Bxd6, which forks queen and rook. Or on 18...Rf7 he gets to play 19. Re7, with all manner of threats along the seventh. Two pawns plus an attack seems a fair return for a knight, especially as black's queenside is so undeveloped.

Then when he got to 18...Kh8, my guess is that he thought again and decided to change his plan by infiltrating a rook to e8 and repositioning his black squared bishop to b2.

Then the rest of the attack sort of flows, with threat after threat, and not so much calculation needed.>

I seriously doubt that Nezhmetdinov was aiming to exchange a knight for two pawns. Then just happened to get 18...Kh8 which changed his plans. Even I could see that the only other legal move 18...Rf7 leads to 19. Re8+ Nf8, 20. R1e7, which is disaster for black.

So, 18 Kh8 is infact forcing, which Nezhmetdinov must have calculated.

Once Qxc7 moves the queen off the back rank, there are several paths to mate and Nezhmetdinov must have seen at least one.

Nov-25-09  Utopian2020: <<Nezhmetdinov never was awarded grandmaster, and if he can't make grandmaster, then I won't ever come close.> He was a GM strength player... the soviet union didn't allow him the the travel (or wouldn't pay for it or something) that would allow him to get the international norms... that's my understanding, anyway.>

From Wikipedia:
Grandmaster Yuri Averbakh, a strong positional and endgame player, suggested a possible reason for this in his interview by Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam in The Day Kasparov Quit:

"Nezhmetdinov, . . . if he had the attack, could kill anybody, including Tal. But my score against him was something like 80 because I did not give him any possibility for an active game. In such cases he would immediately start to spoil his position because he was looking for complications."

Nov-25-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: The winning combination in this game actually begins with the amazing clearance sacrifice 17. Nxc7!

The losing mistake was 16...f5? Instead, 16...Kh8 might have held with drawing chances. Earlier 10...Bd4= would IMO have been Black's best shot at full equality.

Nov-25-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: If 19...Ne5, then 20. R1xe5! wins easily. With strong play, Black is busted after 17. Nxc7!
Nov-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Utopian2020> Indeed, but my point is that the position was clearly winning so he didn't need to calculate to all the way to mate.
Aug-16-10  LIFE Master AJ: http://www.ajschess.com/lifemastera...

My analysis of this game ... its a few years old, maybe Fritz 12 might shed new light here.

Dec-11-10  sevenseaman: An attack any gm would be proud to execute.
Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 5)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Nezhmetdinov, . . . if he had the attack, could kill anybody...
from yAttacks and Sacs of f7 Vol. IV by Fredthebear by fredthebear
Nezhmetdinov, . . . if he had the attack, could kill anybody...
from Heavy Pieces Still Hound the Ranks of FTB by fredthebear
Ruy Lopez
by savya2u
traps and openings
by tivrfoa
Nezhmetdinov, . . . if he had the attack, could kill anybody...
from Attacks a2/a7, b2/b7 and c2/c7 ECO C by FTB by Del ToRo
my favorite games
by iywo
Berlin, Rio Gambit
from Ruy Lopez by KingG
Game 53
from Best Games of Chess (Nezhmetdinov) by Qindarka
25.? (Tuesday, November 24)
from Puzzle of the Day 2009 by Phony Benoni
Rashid Nezhmetdinov's Best Games
by KingG
453 25.
from Sharpen Your Tactics Tactics 350-700 by Sharpen Your Tactics
Attack by Netzmedinov (coach/sec Tal/2nd Morphy )
from Roemer's favorite games by Roemer
White to play, (17. '?') [Another brilliant NEZ win!!!]
from Nezhmetdinov wins!!!!! by LIFE Master AJ


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC