chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Magnus Carlsen vs Yu Yangyi
Qatar Masters (Tie-Breaks) (2015), Doha QAT, rd 1, Dec-29
Indian Game: General (A45)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

NOTE: You are using our new chess viewer, "Olga." For more info see the Olga Quickstart Guide. You can switch back to the old viewer (pgn4web) from the pulldown menu below.

explore this opening
find similar games 3 more Carlsen/Yu Yangyi games
sac: 33.Rxe6 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some people don't like to know the result of the game in advance. This can be done by registering a free account then visiting your preferences page, then checking "Don't show game results".

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.

Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher:


click for larger view

After 32....Rh8. I wonder to what extent Carlsen's next move was pure calculation versus positional evaluation (eg Black's QB is completely out of play).

Dec-30-15  LivBlockade: At a minumum, even at this time control, I'm sure he saw a couple of basic tactics such as:

1) 33...Qd7 pinning the rook


click for larger view

White wins with Rxg6+ and Qxd7

2) After the game continuation 33...fxe6; 34. Qxe6 Qe8 is the only reasonable try to protect the g6 pawn. Then after 35. Qxd6 as played, I would assume that Magnus saw (before playing Rxe6) that the try 35...Qe3+; 36. Kg2 Qxd3


click for larger view

White plays 37. Qd7+ and at least wins the rook with check, with a big advantage.

Just by seeing that much (that little), which Magnus can probably do in one or two seconds (or more likely, he saw it while his opponent was thinking), he knows that Rxe6 is not really a sacrifice.

Dec-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <keypusher> On this comment: <...I wonder to what extent Carlsen's next move was pure calculation versus positional evaluation> Please, spare us such time-wasting ponderings; or perhaps you were trying to impress personage with your command of words and phrases: NOTE: Carlsen does not make such moves as <33.Rxe6> based on "positional evaluation"

Earth to <keypusher>...Earth to <keypusher>...Ground Control to Major Tom...LOL

*****

Dec-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <LivBlockade> thanks, very illuminating!
Dec-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: 30 Qg4 was possible which probably gave Carlsen a preview of the tactics. It isn't obviously crushing because Black has so many choices, but Komodo 9 gives it +4.72 at 29 depth.


click for larger view

If 30...g6 31 Bxg6 fxg6 31 Rxe6 and the position starts to resemble the game.

If 30...Bxe5 31 Nxe5 with the idea of Qh5 and sacrifice on g6, also overwhelming.

However the move 30 Re2 preserves White's threats, and Carlsen gets the decisive blow in a much easier to calculate setting after Black has made a few more positional concessions ( especially g6)

Dec-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <morfishine > good luck with that bug stuck up your ass, buddy.
Dec-31-15  latvalatvian: Avoid all chess computers.
Dec-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: 33.Rxe6! reminds me of this game with an earlier 20.Rxe6!!:

Karpov vs Topalov, 1994

Jan-02-16  rogl: Peter Svidler suggested Rxe6 in his live commentary, so I guess it's not that hard for a super gm to see.
Apr-22-17  yadasampati: Not so difficult. It took me less than half a minute to see that Rxe6 followed by Qxe6 devastates blacks defense, and will either win the bishop on d6 or the pawn on g6.
Apr-22-17  Walter Glattke: Political Party, 37.-Rc7 is draw,
33.Bxg6 Kxg6 34.Rxe6+ fxe6 35.Qxe6+ Kg7
36.Ne5 Bxe5 37.Rf7+ Kg8 38.Qg6+ Bg7
40.Qxg7#
34.-Kg7 35.Ne5 Bxe5 36.(36.g6? Qxh4)Rxf7+ Kxf7 37.Qf5+ Bf6 38.Rxf6+ Qxf6 39.Qxf6+ and Qxh8 +
Fake news, white must begin with 33.Bxg6!
Apr-22-17  Walter Glattke: Or 39.-Kg8 40.g6 Rh7 41.gxh7+ +
Apr-22-17  Walter Glattke: To yada, "political Party" could be
35.Qxd6 Rc6!? but 35.-Qe3+, and black has a Bishop, too, and no pressure to g6. This match looks like a sales party for China.
Apr-22-17  AlicesKnight: I saw the break-in but did not recognise that the attack could afford the Q exchange. But the active White BN and the neutered Black B meant that Carlsen could ignore the return of the exchange. A very smooth performance.
Apr-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  goldfarbdj: I found the first couple of moves, which is more than I usually do on a Saturday.
Apr-22-17  Walter Glattke: Sorry to my comments, I saw a double
perpetual after 35.-Qe3+ 36.Rf2 Qxd3
37.Qf6+ Kg8 38.Qe6+ Kg7 (Kh7?? Qf7#)
or 37.Ne5 Qg3+ 38.Kf1 Qh3+,
while 37.-Nc7 instead 37.-Rxh4? could bring 38.Nxg6 Re8 40.h5 Rf7 or 38.Bxg6 Rf8
Apr-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a bishop and a knight for the bishop pair.

The bishop aims at g6. This suggests 33.Rxe6 based on the line 33... fxe6 (33... Qd7 34.Rxg6+ fxg6 35.Qxd7+ wins) 34.Qxe6 Qe8 35.Qxd6 Qe3+ 36.Rf2 Qxd3 37.Qf6+ Kg8 (37... Kh7 38.Qf7#) 38.Ne5 Qg3+ (38... Qd1+ 39.Kg2 and the double threat Qf7# and Qxg6# wins) 39.Kf1 Qh3+ 40.Ke2 wins as in the previous subline (40... Qd7 41.Nxd7; 40... Qg4+ 41.Nxg4).

That's all I can do today.

Apr-22-17  saturn2: The subtlety is to check the counterplay after ..Qe3+
Apr-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Seen it but gorgeous nonetheless

*****

Apr-22-17  Walter Glattke: I think, that 33.Bxg6 will also win.
Apr-22-17  drollere: <I think, that 33.Bxg6 will also win.>

that was my solution. after Qxe6 or Rxe6 white has two pawns for the piece and two open files, rook loaded, on the K position. the way white capitalizes on black's Rxh4 is very pretty.

Apr-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Laps o e6s everoff overs e6s efforts lives e6s effects e8s erstwhile longs d6s doffeve longs bog evers 35.Qf6+ ado ebb foreign power vim 2 3 over longs c6s coverof long e5s clove e5s eggers bonds e5s ebbers log h4s hoods o f7s fengshui fluffs o g8s ghosteggs viva by a7s aragorns blade it ok von guvs eve c8s churchmen doot 40.Bxg6 point guffaws vim div off c6s cufflog doot 40...Rf8 foods egg forthever vim 2 3 over doot o 41.Bf7+ podium forester vim ford f8s feverhung doot o 41...Kh8 focus egg homehenge win 13 over ebbs do 42.Ng6+ porch gonevow viva won h4s hoods ever egg vow good then ebbs won laps ask vim pals jim v queball two one won get negligent vim choose iffy oh doors h8s harangues won estimate vents e6s esconce then div flid hi fuddy duddy its wait cup nub its i tar chav luv wup cover bounce veg pawn ive cubit ok von guv took it aloof cab twin up put ban cup vis wit alink e6s efforts ave won laps ask vim pals packs kind jive jim move vanquish que ball boot von guv two won net wo bowl vent ten one ie vim oohs negligent vim eg gotcha choose iffy oh doors h8s harangues vim you fuddy duddy its aloof vis ave off 33.Rxe6 fxe6 34.Qxe6 Qe8 35.Qxd6 ado won d6s doffegg inter give mob cob beck be my guest clobber block corroborate bomb bob eve e6s esconce efforts effects fiefdom feel like;

boff coff doff heffa quoff f6s foreign power vims forfeit ok von guv viva crave it her bud;

hood room vim fonds fends off flood floosie vim doffs coff clove e5 eggers eve fluffs 35.Qf6+ ado ebb foreign power vim 2 3 over cot cleft 35...Rc6 36.Qe5+ adds eggers face eve ebbers 36...Qxe5 37.Nxe5 Rxh4 38.Rf7+ oberon focushug key bod ghostarm 38...Kg8 39.Ra7 Rc8 40.Bxg6 Bc6 foods clobber clotter doot 40...Rf8 foot egg forthever vim 2 3 over doot o 41.Bf7+ podium forester vim ford o 41...Kf8 focus for forestmen vim doot o 41...Kh8 focus egg homehenge vim 13 over ebbs do 42.Ng6+ porch gonevow viva won h4s hoods ever egg vow good then ebbs won come yo ye yes coy yum yummy mock meck ye men h4s fist hover over get eg vims here conc berth e6s efforts lovely eg esconce love hoof mews mania news roves free eg vim o quick do deft won egg fog eg goofs h8s harangues what else banyan tree vent hod cuff hod ebullient vim home effort hello dove then does dose boot von guv bet belt bent hoof flesh hock choose took it aloof quite viva vents cove roe h4s hoods ore vein castle over hovel e6s;

esconce vim fords o bloggers mania i oohs bounder jade it in a banyan tree vim vent;

vie then dose quick cub h4s hoods wons um get got doff earth ha dog get toot vint yin won laps o e6s esconce;

Apr-22-17  mel gibson: I thought about
33. Rxe6

but it looked risky.

The computer agrees but blacks reply is different.

33. Rxe6 (33. Rxe6 (♖e2xe6 ♖c8-c7 ♖e6xd6 ♕d8xd6 ♘f3-e5 ♗a8-b7 ♖f1-f6 ♗b7-c8 ♕g4xc8 ♖c7xc8 ♖f6xd6 ♖h8xh4 ♖d6xb6 ♖c8-h8 ♖b6-b7 ♖h4-h1+ ♔g1-f2 ♖h8-h2+ ♔f2-e3 ♖h2-h3+ ♘e5-f3 ♖h1-g1 ♔e3-f4 ♖g1-a1 ♗d3-e2 ♔g7-g8 ♔f4-e5 ♖a1xa4) +3.70/17 171)

score for white +3.70 depth 17

Apr-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  steinitzfan: I'm tempted to actually give myself credit for this one. You do an asymmetric exchange (not really a sacrifice) and get a lot of pressure. A lot of defensive tries by Black to check out after that. Interesting that White can increase his advantage with a queen trade. Avoiding a real sac does have certain advantages.
Apr-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Here's my analysis of today's Saturday puzzle (19. ?) and game with the chessgames.com opening explorer and Stockfish 8:

<1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 d5 3. e3 e6 4. Nf3 a6> My preference is the popular move 4... c5 as in Kamsky vs Nakamura, 2017.

<5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Bd6> More often played is 6... Nc6 as in B Nadera vs Zhou Jianchao, 2007.

<7. Bg3 Nc6 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Ne5 Ne7> Better here IMO is the computer choice 9...Bxe5 10. cxe5 Nd5 = (0.00 @ 34 depth, Stockfish 8) or 9...Qc7 10. Nxc6 Qxc6 11. Bxd6 Qxd6 12, dxc5 Qxc5 = (+0.08 @ 34 depth, Stockfish 8)

<11. Bh4 Nf5 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bf4 Bb7 14. h3 Be7> This slightly passive move appears to lack the activity needed to neutralize the play of the world champion. Instead, the computers prefer 14... Qc7 15. Re1 Rfd8 = (0.00 @ 27 depth, Stockfish 8)

<15. a4 Nd6 16. f3 Nd7 17. Qe2 Nf6 18. Bh2 Qc8 19. Rac1 a5>

A worthy alternative is 19... c4 20. Bc2 b5 21. e4 Qd8 22. Ra1 b4 23. exd5 exd5 24. cxb4 Nde8 25. b3 c3 26. Nb1 Bxb4 27. Nd3 a5 28. Nc5 Bc8 29. Qe3 Ba6 30. Rd1 Nd6 31. Nxc3 Re8 32. Qd2 Re2 33. Nxe2 Bxd2 34. Rxd2 Qb6 35. Rc1 Bxe2 36. Rxe2 Nb7 37. Kf1 Nd8 38. Bg1 Nc6 =.

<20. g4 Qd8 21. Qg2 Nd7 22. f4 Rc8 23. Rce1 cxd4 24. exd4 Ba8> This not at all obvious oversight, allowing 25. g5! to (+1.48 @ 23 depth, Stockfish 8), appears to be Black's decisive error.

Instead 24...Bh4 25. Re2 Nxe5 26. fxe5 Ne4 (+0.40 @ 24 depth, Stockfish 8) gives Black better drawing chances.

<25. g5 hxg5 26. fxg5 Nxe5 27. Bxe5 Nc4 28. Nf3 Nxe5 29. Rxe5 Bd6 30. Re2 g6 31. Qg4 Kg7 32. h4 Rh8?> White is probably winning against best play. However, this makes it too easy for the world champion, who finds the surprise winning move 33. Rxe6!! to solve today's Saturday puzzle.

Black can put up more resistance with 32... Rc7 33. Ne5 Bxe5 34. Rxe5 Rh8 but White still wins after 35. Qf4 Rh7 36. Be2 Kg8 37. h5 gxh5 38. g6 Rg7 39. Rxh5 fxg6 40. Rh6 Bb7 41. Qe5 Rh7 42. Rxg6+ Rcg7 43. Qxe6+ Kh8 44. Rff6 Rh6 45. Bh5 Rxh5 46. Rxg7 Ba6 47. Rg2 Bd3 48. Rh6+ Bh7 49. Rxh5 Qf8 50. Qe5+ Qf6 51. Qxf6#.

<33. Rxe6!! fxe6> If 33... Rc7 White wins after 34. Rxd6 Qxd6 as play might continue 35. Ne5 Re8 36. Rf6 Qf8 37. Nxg6 Re1+ 38. Kg2 Qg8 39. Qf4 Rb7 40. Rd6 f5 41. gxf6+ Kf7 42. Kf2 Re6 43. Ne5+ Rxe5 44. Qxe5 Qe8 45. Qh5+ Kf8 46. Qh8+ Kf7 47. Qg7#.

<34. Qxe6 Qe8> Not 34... Qf8?? 35. Qxg6#.

<35. Qxd6 Rc6 36. Qe5+ Qxe5 37. Nxe5 Rxh4> If 37... Re6, White wins with 38. Rf7+ Kg8 39. Rc7 Rh7 40. Rc8+ Kg7 41. Rxa8 Rxh4 42. Ra7+ Kg8 43. Bxg6 Rd6 44. Bf7+ Kh8 45. Bxd5 Rxd5 46. Ng6+ Kg8 47. Ne7+ Kf8 48. Nxd5 .

<38. Rf7+ Kg8 39. Ra7 Rc8 40. Bxg6 Bc6 41. Bf7+ Kf8 42. Ng6+ 1-0> Black resigns as White wins easy with an extra piece and two additional pawns.

NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: BLITZ (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Omnis stultia laborat fastidio sui。
by hanwubai
rodmalone's favorite games carlsen
by rodmalone
33.? (Saturday, April 22)
from Puzzle of the Day 2017 by Phony Benoni
Great Tactical Sacrifices
by Easy Point
Rooks24's favorite games
by Rooks24
33.? (April 22, 2017)
from Saturday Puzzles, 2011-2017 by Phony Benoni


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC