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Ding Liren vs Alexander Grischuk
World Championship Candidates (2018), Berlin GER, rd 11, Mar-23
Tarrasch Defense: Symmetrical Variation (D32)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Ulhumbrus> 75...Nc3!! Instead of taking the rook Black prefers to give up his bishop for the g pawn>

Po-tay-to, po-ta-toh. Of course, Ding Liren might lose on time. Again, you never know.

Mar-23-18  Ulhumbrus: The white king can control the pair of squares e5 and f6 from eg e6. Now the white rook can control g7 and h8 from h7 and let us say that this forces the bishop out to d4, say. Then how can the rook reach f6 to obstruct the bishop in time? Barring a blunder from Black it looks like a draw.
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: This is insane. You have to look at their longevity statistics to see who has the chance of a win. Even if black has to give the knight for a pawn, K&B vs. K&R is a technical draw, isn't it?
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Afternoon: R vs. Kn is a draw most of the time, so I understand White's desire to keep chasing the Bishop, however it looks like that annoying prelate has too many escape squares on the long diagonal. If Black gets careless (90.Rb6,Kc1??; 91.Rf6), White can still win, but I doubt he can force a win from the current position.
Mar-23-18  That Roger: can queen and king beat knight and bishop?
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Draw agreed
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Incredible save by Grischuk
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Good game, good game!!
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Afternoon: But with the King still on c2, 91...Ne5; 92.Rf4(g7,Nxf6),Kd3 holds.
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: That's it for today, see you back tomorrow morning when we cover the Karjakin-Caruana game.
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I saw the ending only but it looks as though Ding Liren was winning at one stage. So a good defence by Grishuk.
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<whiteshark> Incredible save by Grischuk>

Naaah, I disagree. Incredible yes, but Ding Liren just gave it away with several sub-par moves from 28.Nxd5 through 38.Bd4. Then again, fortune smiles upon the brave.

Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: Although at the <chess24.com> site Stockfish showed that it has a sense of humor. Since 97.g8=Q fails to win against 97...Nh6+, it decided that it had to stop it. And the only way to do that was to play its suggested "top" move, 97.g8=N. :-)

I wonder if it would have played that move in the same position against AlphaZero?

Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: A really incredible game with advantage passing back and forth between both players, so a great save by both players!
Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Liren: Sorry to put you through the wringer like that, Sasha!

Grischuk: No problem, Ding, in fact, allow me to buy you a drink. I know a lovely little hemlock bar just around the corner...

Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <That Roger> I guess K+R+pawn plus bishop usually loses according to the following games from the "endgames" page, but I'm sure it depends on whether the bishop is of the same color as the queening square

Endgame Explorer: RP vs B

I remember when I started to read Reinfeld as a kid, I was already intimidated by all the complicated "elementary end games".

Mar-23-18  starry2013: Both players got in time trouble for quite a few moves before move 40.
Mar-23-18  goodevans: Maybe in a few months time CG.com should put <29. white to move> as a weekday puzzle.

Only trouble is there are two solutions. I'd have got one of them (29.Rxd5) and I guess if presented as a puzzle Ding would have also. At this level of play I would expect him to see this in a game too.

Mar-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: It seemed impossible for Ding to not win and thereby keep his streak alive, but he managed to pull it off. Congrats.
Mar-23-18  csmath: Incredible game maybe. Wild for sure. Good .. not really.
Mar-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <goodevans: Maybe in a few months time CG.com should put <29. white to move> as a weekday puzzle. Only trouble is there are two solutions. I'd have got one of them (29.Rxd5) and I guess if presented as a puzzle Ding would have also. At this level of play I would expect him to see this in a game too.>

Is this the other solution?
29. Nc7 (Ne4 30. Bxe4 Bxe4 31. Rxe4) Rxh7 Qe8+ with mate in 2. Oddly enough black can't take c7 with either the R or the Q without getting mated by Qe8+

Mar-24-18  Nerwal: It is possible to overlook the pretty 29. ♘d8, but missing the forced continuation 32. ♘xf6+ gxf6 33. ♗xf7+ ♕xf7 34. ♕g4+ ♔h7 35. ♕f5+ ♔g7 36. ♖e4 to go for the messy position after 32. ♕e2 ♘fe5 shows Ding Liren was not in his normal state.
Mar-24-18  goodevans: <ChessHigherCat> 29.Rxd5 Qxd5 30.Nd8! would leave black dead in the water. The other super-strong move is the immediate <29.Nd8> which <Nerwal> described as pretty. Blocking the black R's defence of e8 is the key.

Against your <29.Nc7> black should respond <29...Nc1>, as in the game. This seems to be his main resource in many lines. Play might continue <30.Qe3 Nf5 31.Nxd5 Nxe3 32.Nxf6+ gxf6 33.Rxd7> and white is winning this too.

In hindsight, the main problem with <29. white to move> as a puzzle is that besides the two super-strong moves there are several others that are also winning.

Mar-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <goodevans> I saw Ne4 but missed Nc1. I just checked with SF and it gives Nc7 +6.14 in the SF line you mentioned, but I doubt that I would have seen 30. Qe3! over the board. Anyway Nd8! is clearly better. Ye old interference ploy.

Thanks for the analysis.

Mar-25-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Annotated by Daniel King here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B32...
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