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Viswanathan Anand vs Fabiano Caruana
Altibox Norway (2018), rd 8, Jun-07
French Defense: Exchange Variation (C01)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8 OF 8 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Carlsen will surely study the Petroff in depth for the upcoming match.
Jun-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <OrangeTulip>
Korchnoi tried a Petrov against Karpov in the 1981 title match.
Jun-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChemMac: <ajk68:Marmot PFL> (if 47.QXf4 and Stockfish's subsequent line). Stockfish does not "understand" endgame playing, but you may well be correct. Black could win if, after an exchange of the Black d6 pawn and the White b2 pawn, White gets ambitious and pushes his passed pawn. If not, I cannot see a winning method.
Jun-06-18  Imran Iskandar: Very nice game (13...cxd6 is really counterintuitive). My impression was that Anand seemed like he didn't know what to do in the position, and Caruana simply outplayed him.

Despite this, there were chances for Anand to get back into the game after he became seriously worse, namely if he played 39. Bd4 or 45. Bc6, with Caruana's 42...Ra8 being a serious error.

Apparently in the post-mortem Anand thought that 36. g3 would be a draw, but Caruana said that he was hoping for such a move since he had the devilish reply 36...Qf5!!

Jun-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <Imran Iskandar:
Apparently in the post-mortem Anand thought that 36. g3 would be a draw, but Caruana said that he was hoping for such a move since he had the devilish reply 36...Qf5!!>

That would have been a great move:


click for larger view

1) -3.20 (22 ply) 37.Be4 Qxa5 38.Kxe1 d5 39.Kd2 dxe4 40.fxe4 etc.

37...g3, 38. Qf5, on other hand, would have won for white in the game line.

1) mate-in-7 (22 ply) 38.Rxe8+ Rxe8 39.Qxf5 Kg7 40.Qf7+ Kh6 41.Qxe8 g4 42.Qf8+ Kg5 43.f4+ Kg6 44.Be4#

Jun-06-18  sudoplatov: Both Karpov and Kasparov used the Petrov in the 1985, 1986, and 1990 matches.
Jun-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: The reason white didn't play 37...g3 though was 38. Qc1:


click for larger view

1) -3.04 (24 ply) 37...Qc1 38.Rxe8+ Rxe8 39.Be4 Qxb2+

Jun-07-18  CowChewCud: What about 47. Qb4 by white? Doesn't that get the Queen closer to the black king and threaten perpetual or mate?
Jun-07-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <Liquid Crystal Ruminator> I thought of 47. Qb4 but it seemed too dangerous to allow Qc1+, which according to SF just lets black force the trade of queens, which apparently is enough to win because the rook wins a few pawns afterwards.
Jun-07-18  anandrulez: I wonder if there is time for slow maneuvers like 22. Bc2. Similarly allowing 28. ..Ne3 is also not logical.
Jun-07-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: A triumph for carbon-based life forms vs. the silicon monsters? Stockfish doesn't like 13...cxd6, not at all. But it made Black's victory possible and in fact that doubled pawn played a critical role in the final combination (see my previous comment at the top of this page). Also interesting: SF keeps calling the position equal through Black's 24th, but if memory serves, the commenters here thought White had a cramped and uncomfortable position.

If Caruana out-thought Stockfish, we have to cherish this game, for such events will become rarer and rarer until they become nonexistent.

Jun-07-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: My reasoning why 47. Qxf4 is losing is that white's f3 pawn blocks the bishop's protection of the g2 pawn. The rook can capture the f2 pawn creating a passed pawn. The bishop also is screened from the h1 queening square. I have not worked it out in detail but I think the rook can defend from white queening (after capturing on f2). More detailed analysis is needed.
Jun-07-18  Ulhumbrus: In the position after 13...cxd6 if Black's advanced king side pawns are a target instead of a weapon it may be that in order to make this count Anand has to avoid two types of error: That of trying to attack too quickly and that of trying to attack too slowly.

14 c4 undermines the N on e4. If it is the right move it avoids the error of attacking too quickly by attacking the centre first and it avoids the error of attacking too slowly by taking action instead of doing nothing to answer the threat of 14...g4.

We can assume that Anand has considered this move, but he makes another choice and eventually goes on to lose.

One example of a guess as to why Anand loses is that in the position after 13...cxd6 he has overlooked that in the event of ...g4 followed by ...gxf3 and ...fxg2 Black's g pawn gets removed from the board as well as White's so that White's king is not exposed much more than Black's king is exposed if indeed White's king is exposed more than Black's king is exposed at all eg after 14 c4! g4 15 cxd5! gxf3 16 Bxe4 fxg2 17 Bxg2 and we can now see that although White's g pawn has been removed Black's g pawn also has been removed and it is open to question whether Black's king side is not more exposed than White's.

Jun-07-18  WorstPlayerEver: I don't watch post mortems but I wonder what Anand said about 21. Ne1

While 21. Rfe1 seems completely natural. Of course White wants their Bishop at b3, but although Bb5-a4-b3 costs 3 tempi the White pieces are at least placed well.

I guess Anand wanted to complicate the position, but instead he fell into his own trap.

Btw it also is noticable Anand underestimated Caruana's cleverness in comparison to his own cleverness. While I consider both equally clever ^^

Jun-07-18  WorstPlayerEver: SF does not like 14... f5 at all. It gives 15. Qb3 Nf6 16. Na3


click for larger view

Jun-07-18  CountryGirl: Jeez Louise, since when is Anand outplayed on the white side of a Petroff?!? Or even a 'French Exchange'as this game so quickly became? Talk about a bad day at the office...
Jun-07-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: For Vishy, every day's a bad hair day.
Jun-07-18  CowChewCud: I'm not running an engine but couldn't find a forced queen exchange after 47. Qb4 by white.

47. Qb4 Qc1+ 48. Kb5 Qf1+ 49. Bc4 Qxg2 50. Qxd6 Qxb2+ 51. Kc6

Jun-08-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <Rutilant ruminant> It's not too obvious how to force the trade but Uncle Fishstick he say (and I quote) 1) -2.05 (25 ply) 47...Qc1+ 48.Kd3 Qb1+ 49.Ke3 Qe1+ 50.Qxe1 Rxe1+

You might consider shelling out $35 or whatever for the premium membership, which gives you constant access to SF and even the analysis lab, unless you are really strapped for cash, in which case I apologize for bringing it up.

Jun-08-18  JPi: Anand has played too sophistically the opening and gave consistency to the weak double center pawns d6-d5. 15.Qb3 questions the weakness d5. 15...Ne7? 16.NxN fxN 17.Be4 Or 15...Be6?! 16.Qxb7 Na5 17.Qa6 Else 15...Nf6 16.Re1 looks pretty good for White.
Jun-08-18  varishnakov: 1...e5 is my favorite transposition to the French.
Jun-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: Analysis by Houdini 4: d 22 dpa

<1. + / = (0.47): 15.Qb3> Nf6 16.Na3 Rb8 17.f4 g4 18.Nc2 Be6 19.Ne3 Qd7 20.Rae1 Rbe8 21.Re2 Kg7 22.g3 a6 23.Rfe1 Ne4 24.Bxe4 fxe4 25.Kg2 Qf7 26.Qb6

2. + / = (0.39): 15.Qc2 Kg7 16.f3 Nf6 17.Bxf5 Bxf5 18.Qxf5 Qb6 19.Qc2 Rae8 20.Nb3 Re7 21.N1d2 Rfe8 22.a4 Qc7 23.f4 g4 24.Rf2 Nb4 25.Qf5 Nc6 26.h3 Re3 27.hxg4 Ne7 28.Qc2 Nxg4

Jun-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: Analysis by Houdini 4: d 25 dpa done

<1. = (0.18): 13...Qxd6> 14.Nfd2 Nf6 15.Re1 Bg4 16.Qb3 Rfe8 17.Na3 Bd7 18.Nf1 Na5 19.Qc2 Rxe1 20.Rxe1 Re8 21.Rxe8+ Nxe8 22.Qd1 Nf6 23.Nc2 Nc6 24.Nce3 Ne7 25.h3 Bc8 26.Qf3 Kg7 27.Ng3 Bd7 28.b3

2. + / = (0.31): 13...Nxd6 14.Na3 Bg4 15.Nc2 Qf6 16.Be2 Be6 17.Re1 Ne7 18.Ne5 Ng6 19.Bd3 Nf4 20.Ne3 Rfe8 21.Bb1 a5 22.a4 c6 23.h3 Qe7 24.Qf3 Kg7 25.Bc2 Qf6 26.Rad1 Rad8 27.Rd2

3. + / = (0.47): 13...cxd6 14.Nfd2 Re8 15.Bxe4 dxe4 16.d5 Nb8 17.Na3 Nd7 18.Nb5 Nb6 19.Qb3 a6 20.Nd4 Re5 21.c4 Qc7 22.Rfe1 Qc5 23.Nc2 f5 24.Qh3 Kg7 25.b4 Qc7 26.Qb3 Bd7 27.Nd4 Rc8 28.Rac1 f4

Jun-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: Analysis by Houdini 4: d 25 dpa done

1. = (0.20): 12...Re8 13.Qb3 Nh5 14.Qxd5 Bxg3 15.Qxd8 Bxh2+ 16.Kxh2 Rxd8 17.Nbd2 Kg7 18.Rfe1 Nf6 19.g3 Be6 20.Ne4 Nd7 21.Nfd2 Re8 22.f3 Ne7 23.Kg2 Nd5 24.Bc2 b5 25.a4 a6 26.a5 f5

2. = (0.24): 12...Bxg3 13.hxg3 Qd6 14.Re1 Bd7 15.Na3 a6 16.Nc2 Rfe8 17.Ne3 Ng4 18.Nxg4 Bxg4 19.Qb3 Na5 20.Qa4 Nc6 21.Nd2 Bd7 22.Qc2 Kg7 23.Nb3 b6 24.Nd2 a5 25.Nf1 Ne7 26.Ne3 c5 27.b3 cxd4 28.cxd4

Jun-10-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: Analysis by Houdini 4:

d 26 dpa 1. = (0.17): 11...Re8 12.Nbd2 Bf4 13.Re1 Rxe1+ 14.Nxe1 g5 15.Bg3 Bxg3 16.hxg3 Qd6 17.Nc2 Bg4 18.Qb1 Re8 19.Ne3 Bd7 20.Qc2 a6 21.Re1 Ng4 22.Ndf1 h5 23.Bh7+ Kg7 24.Bf5 Nxe3 25.Nxe3 Ne7 26.Bxd7 Qxd7 27.Qe2 g4

d 25 dpa 2. = (0.20): 11...g5 12.Bg3 Ne4 13.Bxd6 Qxd6 14.Nfd2 Nf6 15.Na3 a6 16.Re1 Bg4 17.Qb3 Na5 18.Qa4 b6 19.b4 Bd7 20.Qc2 Nb7 21.Qb2 a5 22.b5 Rfe8 23.Nc2 Ng4 24.g3 Be6 25.Ne3 Nxe3 26.Rxe3 Qe7

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