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Lord Dunsany
  
Number of games in database: 1
Years covered: 1929


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LORD DUNSANY
(born Jul-24-1878, died Oct-25-1957, 79 years old) Ireland

[what is this?]
Wikipedia article: Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany

 page 1 of 1; one game  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Capablanca vs Lord Dunsany ½-½311929Simul, 21bC70 Ruy Lopez

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-12-13  David2009: Check out "The Three Sailor's Gambit" e.g. on
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/dun...
May-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Some more information about him

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward...

A few more games wouldn't go amiss either.

:)

Jul-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ron: Wow, I didn't know till now that the fantasy writer Lord Dunsany played chess. Happy Birthday!
Jul-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Bring me no more reports; let them fly all: Till Baruch Wood remove to Lord Dunsany, I cannot taint with fear.>
Jan-12-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Kapmigs: <The Sea and Chess> by Lord Dunsany

Silence. And silence still.
Then one long roller breaks,
And Hastings' houses fill
With the wild sound it makes.

Silence again. The sea,
Though it may seem to sleep,
Is still the vast and free
Inscrutable old deep.

Who shall entirely scan
All its mysteriousness?
Even the mind of man
Has deeps beyond our guess.

So, when a move has brought
Some strategy in sight,
We cannot plumb the thought
That brought that move to light.

And, small although it be,
And missed by careless eyes,
A chessboard, like the sea,
Has unplumbed mysteries.

Feb-13-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: He influenced Tolkien and others...
Feb-13-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  wtpy: Ms scarlett, isn't it Birnan wood?
Feb-13-18  Retireborn: <wtpy> Baruch Wood (usually referred to as BH Wood) was a well-known figure in British chess circles. Better-known than Lord Dunsany, I should have thought.
Feb-13-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  wtpy: RB, Thanks. Thought there might an inside joke or allusion and appreciate the enlightenment.
Feb-13-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Strange - Winter has a long article on the man, and doesn't mention Dunsey's chess:

(Black to move)


click for larger view

White's pawn can all only move one square at a time. White wins by checkmating Black, Black wins by ridding all White pieces from the board. Variant invented in 1942.

Feb-13-18  dumbgai: Is white allowed to promote pawns in this variant?
Feb-14-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: I am not wasting my money on 3 extra sets so I can have 4 rows of white pawns.

Thank you, very much.

Feb-14-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <dumbgai> I think so...

<Rules are the same as in regular chess, with the following exceptions:

Black moves first.

Only Black's pawns have the two-step option on their first move.

Black wins by capturing all 32 white pawns, while White wins by checkmating Black.

Other rules are the same as regular chess; for example, all pawns can be promoted on the final rank. Stalemate is the same as in regular chess; for example, if White's pawns run out of moves.>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunsa...

<WannaBe> You're no fun! ha!

Feb-16-18  Jean Defuse: ...

[Event "Dublin v Belfast"]
[Site "Dublin"]
[Date "1929.03.02"]
[White "Dunsany, Lord"]
[Black "Manderson, S E."]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B12"]
[PlyCount "68"]

1. d4 c6 2. e4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. f4 e6 5. Nf3 Nd7 6. Bd3 Bxd3 7. Qxd3 Ne7 8. O-O Nf5 9. c3 c5 10. Be3 Qb6 11. b3 Nxe3 12. Qxe3 cxd4 13. cxd4 Nc5 14. Nc3 Na6 15. Qe2 Nc7 16. Rac1 Be7 17. Qd3 O-O 18. Ne2 Qb5 19. Qxb5 Nxb5 20. a4 Na3 21. Rc7 Bd8 22. Rxb7 Bb6 23. b4 Nc4 24. a5 Bd8 25. Rc1 Re8 26. Nc3 Re7 27. Rxe7 Bxe7 28. Na2 Rb8 29. Ne1 Bxb4 30. Rb1 Bd6 31. Rxb8+ Bxb8 32. a6 Bc7 33. Nb4 Bb6 34. Nc6 Kf8 1/2-1/2

Source: http://www.irlchess.com/games-2/

...

Feb-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <WannaBe: I am not wasting my money on 3 extra sets so I can have 4 rows of white pawns.>

You would actually need 23 extra sets. at most.

Feb-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Presumably 2 extra sets, though I thought longer about 23 than I should have :-)
Feb-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Dionysius1: Presumably 2 extra sets, though I thought longer about 23 than I should have :-)>

There are 32 potential white queens on the board. That is more than 2 sets.

Feb-17-18  Retireborn: <offramp> Construct a legal game in which all 32 pawns queen. That'll teach you not to be a clever dick, won't it :)
Feb-17-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Retireborn: <offramp> Construct a legal game in which all 32 pawns queen. That'll teach you not to be a clever dick, won't it :)>

I <did> say <You would actually need <23> extra sets. at most>. 32 queens would be <un peu trop>. Too much queeniness. 23, I think, might be possible.

Feb-17-18  Retireborn: <offramp> Good point! Personally I think that even three queens would be un big trop.
Feb-17-18  Cibator: Thirty-two queens! One can't help picturing a kind of atomic explosion as the poor old board struggles unsuccessfully to contain that much power in such a confined space ...
Feb-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Nice one <offramp> and <Retireborn>. And when you're doing the calculations <offramp> don't forget a good standard set comes with 2 queens of each colour.
Feb-18-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: And like schoolboys do you can turn rooks on their heads. (And I know you said at most, but the minimum required in optimum circumstances would make a more satisfying solution :-) )
Mar-31-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Kapmigs:\
Who shall entirely scan
All its mysteriousness?
Even the mind of man
Has deeps beyond our guess.>

Dunsany uses the word <scan> in its correct sense:
"look at all parts of (something) <carefully> in order to detect some feature."

Jul-05-18  LonelyHaikuLady: He was a great poet
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