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SirChrislov
Chess Game Collections
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  1. 100 Best Chess Games of the 20th Century, RANKED


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    A beauty pageant of chess games! Selected, judged, ranked and (lightly) annotated by the author of the classic "Soviet Chess 1917-1991".

    <How do you pick only 100?>

    I know right? Ok, here's how GM Soltis' choice of the best played games from the last 100 years came to be: Out of thousands of carefully selected games, only 300 proved worthy candidates for the book. Those "chosen few" were judged primarily for their moves, evaluated in 5 categories, and after final rankings... these were the 100 beauties that made the show.

    "No attempt was made to break ties and no particular significance should be attached to the order of games that received the same score. No attempt was made to balance the selection according to period, nationality of players, or opening. The aim was not to achieve mathematical exactitude. Chess is not that simple. The goal was to reduce, as much as possible, the subjective and personal predilections of the person doing the evaluation. Of course, there will be disagreements over the numbers. But I believe that a fair-minded judge would agree that in the main these evaluations are even-handed and unbiased." --The Author

    <Some interesting final "stats" (not found in book)>

    All classical world champions after Steinitz's death are represented here with at least one effort. Congrats to Mr. Kasparov who brought it the most times with 6 victories, more than any other player. Sadly, 2nd world champion Lasker made the list with one defeat, while the great Karpov got served 3 times(!)

    Kasparov 6
    Fischer 4[1/2]
    Botvinnik 4[1/2]
    Capablanca 4[1/2]
    Alekhine 4
    Tal 3[1/2]
    Spassky 3
    Smyslov 2
    Petrosian 2
    Euwe 1
    Lasker -1 (Lasker vs W Napier, 1904 and Lasker vs Capablanca, 1914 are overrated acc. to Soltis.) Karpov -3 Consolation prize for Karpov vs Kamsky, 1992 perhaps? Although none his wins made it into the author's 100 best list, this Karpov victory is somewhat praised (and awarded 5 exclams) by Soltis in the intro.

    <Who got the most games?> Capablanca and Rubinstein are the players with the most games. Each are seen in 7 encounters.

    <Games between same opponents>

    Karpov-Kasparov (2)
    Nimzovich-Rubinstein (2)
    Gligorich-Petrosian (2)

    <Game with the most !> A whopping 21 exclams is given by Soltis to <Johansson v Rey-Ardid 1933> (game #15).

    <Top Scorers> Games that received the 20-point maximum in any of the 5 criteria

    (1) <Aesthetics> Polugaevsky-Nezhmetdinov 1958
    Bogolyubov-Alekhine 1922
    Stoltz-Steiner 1952
    Rotlewi-Rubinstein 1907
    Geller-Smyslov 1965
    Larsen-Spassky 1970
    Chekhover-Kasparyan 1936
    Nezhmetdinov-Chernikov 1962

    (2) <Originality> Lilienthal-Ragozin 1935
    Gufeld-Kavalek 1962
    Johner-Nimzovich 1926
    Reti-Rubinstein 1923
    Capablanca-Nimzovich 1928
    Polugaevsky-E Torre 1981

    (3) <Opposition> Keres-Dyckhoff 1935

    (4) <Soundness> Capablanca-Marshall 1918
    Kasparov-Anand 1995

    (5) <Breadth/Depth> Estrin-Berliner 1965

    Total Wht wins 56
    Draws 7
    Total Blk wins 37

    by GM A. Soltis
    McFarland 2000, 2006 (reprint).

    <Soltis concludes with the following note...>

    Will the 21st century produce 100 games this good? The author of another best games collection was not optimistic about the future. He compiled 157 examples of brilliant play from previous decades but concluded that "there has been no first-class play during the past few years." Contemporary masters were too concerned with money, and "emulatory games, formerly so popular and so frequent, are now of rare occurrence." So wrote Henry Bird in 1875. The same might be said of 2000. But we shall see...

    101 games, 1902-1999

  2. Birth of Modern Chess & The Romantic Era
    <"The game is so ancient that, by that distinction alone,
    seems taken beyond the category
    of games altogether, and it has been said
    that it probably would have perished
    long ago, had it not been destined
    to live forever.">
    -Henry Edward Bird

    The God Euphron created the game of chess, and Ares presented it as a gift to the forest nymph Caissa in an attempt to win her affection, tells one greek-mythology inspired story. Centuries before that, Damiano believed and wrote in his book that the game was invented by King Xerxes I of Persia.

    Chess has a deeply rich history but truth is, its precise origins remain a mystery. It is impossible to say when the game was first brought into this world for none of these stories have any solid foundation for their support. It is a pastime of very remote antiquity. Most historians agree it first made its appearance in 6th Century India, a game then known as Chaturanga played between four individuals, moves decided by dice. Chaturanga was possibly inspired by an even older Indian dice-playing game called Ashtapada. For the Indians, the game was invented by a queen of Ceylon (Lanka). The game then spread to Persia (now Iran) where it was modified into a two player game called Shatranj; and southern Europe, where it evolved in 15th century Spain into the style we play it today. http://history.chess.free.fr/origin...

    <The Birth of Modern Chess, A brief history>

    Before chess was chess, it was this:
    http://www.chess-poster.com/english...

    1220- Chess is no longer played with dice to determine moves.

    1275- Option of pawn two-square advance first introduced in Italy.

    1422- Manuscript states that stalemate is a draw. Before this time, it was considered a loss for the side being stalemated.

    1455-1600(?)- Castling is played as two separate moves, later introduced as single-move by Ruy Lopez in his mid-16th century manuscript.

    1475- Beginning of modern chess takes place in southern Europe: Vizier replaced by Dama (Queen) and Elephant replaced by Alfil (Bishop). Bishop promoted to advance/retreat any number of diagonal cells & Queen obtains power of moving along all lengths of diagonals, ranks and files.

    1490- Special pawn capture "En Passant" is introduced.

    1497- Lucena publishes the modern rules in 'Repetición de Amores y Arte de Ajedrez con cl Iuegos de Partido' Salamanca, Spain.

    Early 1500(?)- Pawn promotion to higher power takes effect. Before this time, upon reaching the 8th rank, a pawn was only allowed promotion to bishop.

    <The Romantic Age>

    Although Ruy Lopez de Segura-born circa 1530-was the first analyst, it is said that the modern age began with Philidor, the first profound thinker.

    I leave you with what is perhaps Philidor's best known game followed by some historically interesting 19th century romantics-(In playing over these games, it is best not to ask too many questions about the defender's play, for defensive technique was in the dark ages and little understood even by the best players.)

    42 games, 1790-1899

  3. Chess Informant: 100 Golden Games + 10 Best
    Every game that received golden game status from the first publication in 1966-to present.

    *In 2008, Informant put out 'Best of the Best 1000' to celebrate their 100th issue and nominate the 10 best golden games. Those are at the top of this list.

    For the 10 best of vol. 1-24:
    Game Collection: Chess Informant: 640 Best Games - Part 1

    Game Collection: Chess Informant: 640 Best Games - Part 2

    Game Collection: Chess Informant: 640 Best Games - Part 3

    The 100 Golden:

    100 games, 1966-2007

  4. His absolute favorites: GK's Golden Chess Stock
    All the material with detailed analysis and hand-picked by the legend himself for the 2001 release "Virtual Kasparov" by Titus software. Part I (Garry's Library & Hall of Fame): GK analysis of his favorite W. Champion games from Steinitz to Karpov, Part II: Garry picks the 50 most significant works from his vast career, plus bonus tutorial content:

    bonus tutorial I: GK analysis of a study by Gio Greco, ca. 1625

    bonus tutorial II: Kasparov discusses 2 GM games

    bonus tutorial III: Kasparov reviews 3 brilliant q-sac games

    Study these games that have Kasparov's stamp of approval!

    Part I. World Champions...

    69 games, 1620-1999

  5. Mexicans vs. the Elite
    Mexicans defeat the best. Includes victories over world-class calibers Anand, Shirov, Alekhine, Tal, And of course, the immortal "Windmill" combination over Lasker.

    Victorias de jugadores Mexicanos sobre calibres mundiales de la talla de Anand, Shirov, Alekhine, Tal, etc. Y a huevo... la inmortal del Molino sobre Lasker.

    34 games, 1925-2010

  6. Repetición de amores E arte de axedres x Lucena
    <Repeticion de amores E arte de axedres con CL juegos de partido> "Discourse on love and art of chess with 150 positions" published in Salamanca, Spain in 1497 by Lucena... and the rest is history.

    This ancient book is the Pachamama of all texts on the modern game. It's like Caissa handing down the first holy chess literature to Lucena, as God did the 10 commandments to Moses. In the last quarter of the XV Century, the rules of modern play had already been in use but for the first time they were unified into one book.

    150 compositions. 75 in the old rules (Shatranj or "del viejo" in the author's words) and 75 in the modern rules ("de la dama" in the author's words). I will attempt to decode all 75 diagrams in the modern rules and show them here; and those meant to be solved with the old rules that can also work under modern rules as well.

    <Nota bene> I found that diagrams #1,2,3,5,9 (all mate in one) appear to be "delayed mates" for the words of the author are very clear: <Lucena: "The white have the hand and has said he will check and mate black in two shots. not more or less."> Also, in position #2, black's pawn appears to be moving up, so if you find yourself stuck on some, try solving with black at the bottom.

    juego de partido #1, pagina 100.
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #2, pg. 101
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #3, pg. 102
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #4, pg. 103
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #5, pg. 104
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #6, pg. 105
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #7, pg. 106
    mate en dos de blancas
    white mates in 2


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    juego de partido #8, pg. 107
    mate en dos de blancas
    wht mates in 2


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    juego de partido #9, pg. 108
    mate en dos de blancas
    wht mates in 2


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    juego de partido #10, pg. 109
    juegan negras, mate en dos de blancas
    blk to play, wht mates in 2


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    juego de partido #21, pg. 120
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #24, pg. 123
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3 (delayed mate)


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    juego de partido #25, pg. 124
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #27, pg. 126
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #28, pg. 127
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #29, pg. 128
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #32, pg. 131
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #39, pg. 138
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #44, pg. 143
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #45, pg. 144
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #46, pg. 145
    mate en 3 de blancas con peon
    wht checkmates with a pwn in 3


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    juego de partido #47, pg. 146
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #48, pg. 147
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #49, pg. 148
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #50, pg. 149
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #51, pg. 150
    mate en 3 de blancas
    w/m in 3


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    juego de partido #53, pg. 152
    mate en 3 de blancas
    w/m in 3(delayed mate)


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    juego de partido #54, pg. 153
    mate en 3 de blancas con peon del b6
    wht mates in 3 with b6 pawn


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    juego de partido #55, pg. 154
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    juego de partido #58, pg. 159
    mate en 3 de blancas con peon de b6
    wht mates in 3 with b6 pwn


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    juego de partido #59, pg. 160
    mate en 3 de blancas
    wht mates in 3


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    pg. 178
    mate en 4


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    pg. 179
    mate en 4 con peon d5
    mate in 4 with d5 pawn


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    wht mates in 5
    (The original smothered mate. First example ever.)


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    3 games, 1475-1515

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