chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian vs Viktor Korchnoi
Petrosian - Korchnoi Candidates Semifinal (1971), Moscow URS, rd 9, Jul-22
English Opening: King's English Variation. General (A20)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 22 times; par: 62 [what's this?]

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 69 more Petrosian/Korchnoi games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can learn a lot about this site (and chess in general) by reading the Chessgames Help Page. If you need help with premium features, please see the Premium Membership Help Page.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-24-08  slomarko: the Danish master?
Nov-24-08  Jim Bartle: If I were afraid of an opponent, I'd get him his tea, arrange his chair, ask him if he slept well...
Dec-01-08  Sem: Nice try, slomarko. Keep it up!
Dec-01-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Zenchess: <Petrosianic> Link doesn't work.
Jan-09-09  hoppelstoppler: I agree to Sanyas who wrote:
"Korchnoi should instead have played 21...Bc3."
Possibly 21. b4!? was more accurate than 21. Re1...(?!)
Jan-11-09  talfan: Jim Bartle: If I were afraid of an opponent, I'd get him his tea, arrange his chair, ask him if he slept well...

That was funny.

Aug-09-09  totololo: Is it not this match that was arranged by the Russian government to let Petrosian to face Fischer? Do I miss something? Kortchnoi could play better then that.....
Aug-09-09  Lt.Surena: Pre-arranged? Do we sense Fischer's paranoid schizo syndrome in here? Bobby thought that Gary's games were also pre-arranged. Does Viktor still play with Marcozy thru a medium?

The fact is Tigran won more World Championships than Bobby and Vikor COMBINED. Get over it dude.

Nov-13-09  M.D. Wilson: Petrosian, Korchnoi and Fischer were all champions. Petrosian was the first player to defend the title by winning a match since Alekhine. Korchnoi is probably the strongest player, second perhaps only to Keres, never to become World Champion. Fischer, the greatest Challenger the game has seen, was head and shoulders above the rest of the world, but, for what ever reason, stopped playing. Could he have kept on playing great games and beating almost everyone? Probably. Would he have retained his aura of invincibility against the new super stars on the block, Karpov and Kasparov? Probably not; but hell, we missed some pretty interesting games, that's for sure.
Aug-13-11  Ulhumbrus: The move 22 b4! is the first of a group of moves, the third being the exchange 23 Bxc6!!
Nov-12-11  Ulhumbrus: The move 22 b4! is the first of a group of moves, the third being the exchange 24 Bxc6!!
Mar-01-12  ewan14: I believe it was Karpov who suggested the 1971 Korchnoi - Petrosian was pre - arranged ( per Kasparov )
Mar-01-12  ewan14: I have read one of Korchnoi's books and he does seem to be fair about most of his opponents

He admits it was a mistake to play the King's Indian Defence against Spassky in 1968 after he ( Korchnoi ) had brought the match back to 2 - 1

Mar-01-12  King Death: <ewan14> The KID was definitely not in Korchnoi's style and he made what I think of as a psychological miscalculation. He was very lucky (as he knew) to win the game against Spassky that brought him back to 1-2 in decisive games in the 1968 match.
Mar-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Knight is going to be trapped.

42.♕e6 and it's cooked or else white checks on h6 followed by mate.

Apr-25-12  LoveThatJoker: What a great game!

LTJ

Aug-08-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  DrNyet: Some games from this match, including this one were annotated by Spassky in Chess Life & Review, Nov 1971, p 625. His notes for this game are not extensive, but seem to indicate lackluster play by Korchnoi.

After 8... Nec6 he writes (using the descriptive notation of the day instead of the algebraic text shown here): "Is Korchnoi thinking of developing the Queen Knight to f6? In that case the Knights reach the squares c6 and f6 in four moves instead of the possible two." After 15.Bc1: "While Korchnoi has no plan, Petrosian steadfastly improves the position of his pieces." 19...Rad8: "One gets the impression that Black is not coordinating his moves as a single entity."

It would be amusing if Spassky knew that the situation alleged by Karpov was true and was being a little sarcastic on the sly.

Apr-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <DrNyet: Some games from this match, including this one were annotated by Spassky in Chess Life & Review, Nov 1971, p 625. His notes for this game are not extensive, but seem to indicate lackluster play by Korchnoi. After 8... Nec6 he writes (using the descriptive notation of the day instead of the algebraic text shown here): "Is Korchnoi thinking of developing the Queen Knight to f6? In that case the Knights reach the squares c6 and f6 in four moves instead of the possible two." >

Fischer played ....Nec6 in a similar position later that year against Petrosian. Do you think he was trying to throw the game?


click for larger view

Petrosian vs Fischer, 1971

Petrosian here took two moves to play e4, developed his QB to b2 then played it back to c1, and played Bf1-g2-f3-g4 and then moved it back to g2. That was all in the first 20 moves. Do you think <he> was trying to throw the game?

I'm with <Petrosianic> -- I think Korchnoi was trying to win, overextended himself and lost. Petrosian tried to get Fischer to do the same, but it didn't work.

Jun-08-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < Penguincw: Knight is going to be trapped. 42.♕e6 and it's cooked or else white checks on h6 followed by mate. >

exactly. I saw this almost instantly, so i'm surprised Korch had time to resign before Petro pounced in it, kinda like Fischer did to Spassky with ..Bxa4! in game 5 (1972)

Aug-24-20  Ulhumbrus: <Penguincw: Knight is going to be trapped.

42.♕e6 and it's cooked or else white checks on h6 followed by mate.> To be a little more specific, 42 Qe6 threatens, in addition to 43 Qxd7, 43 Qh6+ and in reply to either 42...Kf7 or 42...Kg8, 43 Qg7 mate.

This suggests that the purpose of the thrust Qe6 is that it is the first move of the three move manoeuvre Qe2-e6-h6-g7

Aug-24-20  SChesshevsky: < DrNyet: Some games from this match, including this one were annotated by Spassky in Chess Life & Review, Nov 1971, p 625. His notes for this game are not extensive, but seem to indicate lackluster play by Korchnoi... After 15.Bc1: "While Korchnoi has no plan, Petrosian steadfastly improves the position of his pieces." 19...Rad8: "One gets the impression that Black is not coordinating his moves as a single entity.">

Not sure I totally agree with Spassky here. Appears Korchnoi did have some plan. A weak plan maybe but something.

Seems pretty clear from 15.Bc1 Qe7 16.Bg4 f5 17.exf5 gxf5 18.Bf3 Nf6 19.Bg2 Rad8 20.Ra2 Bc8 black is going for some sort of break up the middle. But the setup took three tempo if counting 21...Kh8. That seems a lot of time to set up a break. Yeah, it's from a decently good position. But not one without own weaknesses.

Think Korchnoi might've missed 23. Nb3. Now this results in two more lost tempo and a couple of pieces that might've been useful in the center break aren't in a position to participate. Apparently, Korchnoi tries to force the break anyway and things just get bad.

Does seem a strange game by Korchnoi, taking all that time from 15. for his center break plan. Maybe he just figured Petrosian had nothing and just expected 23. axb4 and being better from there?

Sep-05-20  Ulhumbrus: <SChesshevsky: < DrNyet: Some games from this match, including this one were annotated by Spassky in Chess Life & Review, Nov 1971, p 625. His notes for this game are not extensive, but seem to indicate lackluster play by Korchnoi... After 15.Bc1: "While Korchnoi has no plan, Petrosian steadfastly improves the position of his pieces." 19...Rad8: "One gets the impression that Black is not coordinating his moves as a single entity.">

Not sure I totally agree with Spassky here. Appears Korchnoi did have some plan. A weak plan maybe but something.

Seems pretty clear from 15.Bc1 Qe7 16.Bg4 f5 17.exf5 gxf5 18.Bf3 Nf6 19.Bg2 Rad8 20.Ra2 Bc8 black is going for some sort of break up the middle. But the setup took three tempo if counting 21...Kh8. That seems a lot of time to set up a break. Yeah, it's from a decently good position. But not one without own weaknesses.

Think Korchnoi might've missed 23. Nb3. Now this results in two more lost tempo and a couple of pieces that might've been useful in the center break aren't in a position to participate. Apparently, Korchnoi tries to force the break anyway and things just get bad.

Does seem a strange game by Korchnoi, taking all that time from 15. for his center break plan. Maybe he just figured Petrosian had nothing and just expected 23. axb4 and being better from there?>

This suggests an interesting question.

Black can choose more than one possible aim for his moves. Moreover Black can choose which aims to concentrate on. The question is: Which choices enable one to say that Black is <coordinating his moves as a single entity>?

One example of a possible answer is as follows.

The sequel to Petrosian’s breakthrough 22 b4! helps to suggest that if Black keeps his king’s bishop on a5 his queen’s rook is not placed best on d8; whereas if Black chooses to play his queen’s rook to d8 his king’s bishop is not placed best on a5.

This suggests that Black’s “investment choice” of the square a5 for Black’s king bishop does not assist the most Black’s “investment choice” of the square d8 for Black’s queen’s rook, while Black’s “investment choice” of the square d8 for Black’s queen’s rook does not assist the most Black’s “investment choice of the square a5 for Black’s king bishop.

This suggests that in order for Black to <coordinate his moves as a single entity> the various “investment choices” he makes for his choices of piece emplacements have be such that they assist each other the most.

Perhaps this is what Spassky means by <coordinating his moves as a single entity> or what Capablanca means by <coordinating the actions of one’s pieces>.

To make the thing more complete, this is only one example of a possible answer. It does not have to be the final answer or the right answer.

Sep-06-20  SChesshevsky: <Ulhumbrus:... Perhaps this is what Spassky means by coordinating his moves as a single entity...> Again not 100% behind Spassky's take on Korchnoi's move choices. Think it's a bit biased on the result from Petrosian's preemptive 22. b4 and the real star 23. Nb3. Yeah, in that circumstance, the Ba5 is badly placed and the slow build-up probably too lackadaisical.

But have a feeling Korchnoi took so slow because he believed Petrosian would linger and maneuver a bit longer. Maybe expecting something like 22. Re2, getting out of the pin, ...Rfe8 then 23. b4 cxb4 24. axb4 Bxb4 25. Nb3, then he can break up the center ...e4 with 26. dxe4 fxe4.

A position where Korchnoi looks pretty well coordinated and one he probably would be comfortable with.

But it appears Petrosian beating him to the punch and the, I believe, missed attacking Nb3, ended up revealing the weakness in Korchnoi's piece placement.

Sep-06-20  Petrosianic: <keypusher>: <Fischer played ....Nec6 in a similar position later that year against Petrosian. Do you think he was trying to throw the game?>

No, but we're not trying to explain away the result of that game.

Sep-08-20  Ulhumbrus: < SChesshevsky>

In my last message <This suggests that in order for Black to <coordinate his moves as a single entity> the various “investment choices” he makes for his choices of piece emplacements have be such that they assist each other the most.> should read <This suggests that in order for Black to <coordinate his moves as a single entity> the various “investment choices” he makes for his choices of piece emplacements have <to> be such that they assist each other the most.>

Raymond Keene has said of the move 24 Bxc6!! <A remarkable move but without it White would have nothing> This move is only one of an entire group of moves including 22 b4 and 23 Nb3.

One example of a reason why Korchnoi may have not seen it is that White concedes his white squared bishop. Another example of a reason why Korchnoi may have not seen it is that he was not looking for it whereas Petrosian was looking for a group of moves that would serve to attack Black's centre. To quote Anand < You see what you are looking for>

However can White in fact get away with it? One alternative to 25...a6 is 25...f4 opening lines for Black's queen's bishop even if it costs one or two pawns.

search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Game 96
from Python Strategy (Petrosian) by Qindarka
"aesthetic aggregation of force in the centre" -- Keene
from Petrosian teaches you how to play chess by notyetagm
A sign of the future...
from INSTANT REPERTOIRE 15 by KLN1973
English Opening
by mneuwirth
Korchnoi vs World Champions Decisive Games Petrosian
from Korchnoi vs World Champions Decisive Games by visayanbraindoctor
annotated by Spassky in Chess Life & Review, Nov 1971, p 625
from Published Games by Year and Unconfirmed Source 5 by fredthebear
Power Chess - Petrosian
by Anatoly21
Game 103 in Chess Informant Best Games 101-200
from yDble Fio mostly White, Reti/Zukertort & GB Game by fredthebear
Engels
by mdijkstra
Petrosian v. the Elite
by rbaglini
to Modern Defence Reversed
from Nimzowitsch/Larsen Attack by Raymond Keene by iamlam
Game 168
from Guinness Book - Chess Grandmasters (Hartston) by maple227
white HS
from 98_A56_Hromadka System by whiteshark
22. b4!
from Petrosian's Beautiful Pawn Pushes by Caissanist
Game 82
from Veliki majstori saha 27 PETROSJAN (Marovic) by Chessdreamer
Admirable Korchnoi, even when he loses
from Keyword: imagination by Sem
Game 41
from Move by Move - Petrosian (Engqvist) by Qindarka

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2020, Chessgames Services LLC