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Ewoud de Groote vs David Arutinian
Vienna op 16th (2009), Vienna AUT, rd 2, Aug-16
Nimzowitsch Defense: Williams Variation (B00)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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sac: 20...Nfxd5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Beautiful combination! However, it works because White played 22.Qg1, and the Queen no longer defends f3. How does Black win after 22.Bg1,Bc6; 23.Nf3 (or Bf3)?
Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: <Kt going the wrong way> Our computers show both knight sacs as winning, with 20...Nfxd5 being slightly more accurate.
Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: <Penguincw: Ugh, a Sunday puzzle. Couple things I notice about a Sunday puzzle.

Firstly, (like today), there's hardly any comments (shouldn't come as a surprise). On Sundays, I've seen half an hour before the first comment....>

Perhaps Sunday doesn't arrive at the same hour for all participants of this site? Just a thought sent from Copenhagen.

Jul-03-16  Honey Blend: <An Englishman: Good Evening: Beautiful combination! However, it works because White played 22.Qg1, and the Queen no longer defends f3. How does Black win after 22.Bg1,Bc6; 23.Nf3 (or Bf3)?>

After 22. ♗g1 ♖f2+! looks decisive.


click for larger view

Leading to 23. ♗xf2 ♕xf2#

Jul-03-16  scormus: instructive puzzle. The instinct is to take the g-pawn but I found that leads nowhere, neither with N nor h-pawn.

W's weakness lies in the diagonals and the f-file, anf the K wont be able to hide when they are open. 20 ... Nxd5 is logical though I confess I was too fixated about taking the g-pawn to see it.

Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Now THAT was a nice little combination by Black from move 20.
Jul-03-16  diagonalley: join others in admiration of this beautiful combination and finish ... not perhaps "insane" although definitely extremely hard to visualise and calculate
Jul-03-16  morfishine: <al wazir: This game is labeled a Nimzowitsch Defense, but it isn't. It's a Pirc/Robatsch/Modern opening that transposes into a KID. That's the only thing I got right, but I want full credit anyway for pointing that out.>

I don't think anybody really cares

Jul-03-16  john barleycorn: nice game. the combination brought back some memories to this one

Letelier vs Fischer, 1960

Jul-03-16  Hans Kastorp: With a queen and a rock down the black finally had a sweet choice between Nf4# and Nc3#. Awesome!
Jul-03-16  mel gibson: This was super hard & an excellent game by black.

DR4 64 bit agrees with the text move but white fights a little better - yet still loses badly.

Jul-03-16  AlicesKnight: <john barleycorn> Excellent example. Also perhaps Baratz vs Menchik, 1928
Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Too much like hard work for a Sunday Morning. Rarely try a Saturday/Sunday puzzle. Far to lazy.

Slowly clicked through it nodding in agreement with every move like a typical C.G. Kibitzer marking a school report.

I was looking for the Monday puzzle.

Ahha! Black to play.


click for larger view

23...Qxf3+

Not going to miss that one. A few days ago in 3 minute blitz on Gameknot I had a spiritual experience that featured a Queen sac and mate with a Knight and two Bishops.

Here White to play:


click for larger view

(yes I am Rook down. That Bishop on F6 took it. I allowed it to escape back to f6 to build up this attack.

I tried to play 19.Qd5.

But the ghost of Marshall moved the Queen to d6 (OK it was a mouse slip.)

19.Qd6 Kg7


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20.Qxf6+ Kxf6 and mate with 22. Bb2


click for larger view

Jul-03-16  Razgriz: Nope. Never saw the white squared bishop move at all.
Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: my fastest growing Game Collection: 85#__How to get away with Checkmate otb
Jul-03-16  YouRang: Now that was an impressive mate!

I didn't get it, although I did at one point think that ...Nfxd5 was a likely opening move because it opens the Q+R battery on the f-file, and (after exd5 ...Nxd5) plants a strong N on d5.

But the fog was too thick to see how to proceed from there.

Jul-03-16  YouRang: One key point I overlooked was that removing Pd5 also opened c6 as a wonderful attacking square for the LSB.

With this, black's bishops really ruled the board, as the final position attests.

Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The material is identical.

White has the positional threat h-pawn 21.cxd6 cxd6 22.Nb6 Rd8 23.Nxd7 and the h-pawn is under attack.

The white king doesn't look very safe. This suggests 20... Nfxd5, to open the f-file and the a8-h1 diagonal and creating several threats (Nxe3+, Rf2+, Bxa4-Nc3, etc.):

A) 21.Bg1 Rf2+ 22.Bxf2 Qxf2#.

B) 21.Nf1 Nxe3+ 22.Nxe3 Rf2+ 23.Kg1 (23.Bxf2 Qxf2#) 23... Rg2+ 24.Nxg2 (24.Kxg2 Qf2#) 24... Qf2+ 25.Kh2 Bg3#.

C) 21.Nc4 Nxe3+ as in B.

D) 21.Qb3 Rf2+ 22.Kg1 Rxe2 23.Qxd5+ Kh8

D.1) 24.Qd3 Bb5

D.1.a) 25.Qc3 Bf2+ wins (26.Bxf2 Qxf2#; 26.Kg(h)2 Bxe3+ 27.Kg3 Qf2#).

D.1.b) 25.Nc4 Bxc4 26.Qxc4 Rxe3, with two extra pawns and the threats Qf2# and Rg3+, looks winning.

D.2) 24.Nc4 Rxe3 25.Nxe3 Qf2#.

D.3) 24.Qe4 Bf2+ wins decisive material.

D.4) 24.Qf3 Bc6 25.Qxf8+ Rxf8

D.4.a) 26.Nf1 Rg2#.

D.4.b) 26.Rh2 Rxe3 - + [2B+2P vs 2N].

Jul-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Wish I had seen that after 20...Nfxd5, below, black has a forced mate in 4 threat beginning with 21...Rf2+.


click for larger view

Jul-03-16  poachedeggs: Got the initial idea of activity the black pieces by exchanging knight for pawn. But getting the bishop to C6 for the later discovered check got me.
Jul-03-16  Virgil A: Amazing!
Jul-03-16  Patriot: <agb2002> In your line D) after 23.Qxd5+, why not 23...Nxd5?
Jul-03-16  BOSTER: Strategic important point like pawn d5 should be oberprotected. So, 19.c5 was simple blunder.
Jul-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> In your line D) after 23.Qxd5+, why not 23...Nxd5?>

I forgot to include 21.exd5 Nxd5, sorry.

I had a look at the puzzle early in the morning in Segovia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seg...) and posted my solution in Murcia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mur...) after driving five hours.

By the way, Isabel I, the queen who presumably inspired the current powerful piece of chess, was crowned in Segovia on Dec 13, 1474.

Jul-04-16  Patriot: <agb2002> Ah ok! Yeah I also wondered why you didn't include such a critical move as 21.exd5.

That's cool about Segovia.

Have a safe trip.

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