chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Robert James Fischer vs Oscar Panno
Portoroz Interzonal (1958), Portoroz SLO, rd 10, Aug-20
Sicilian Defense: Old Sicilian. Open (B32)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

NOTE: You are using our new chess viewer, "Olga." For more info see the Olga Quickstart Guide. You can switch back to the old viewer (pgn4web) from the pulldown menu below. If you have questions or suggestions see our Olga chessforum.

explore this opening
find similar games 2 more Fischer/Panno games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some games have photographs. These are denoted in the game list with the icon.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
    [help]

Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-05-05  ArturoRivera: mmm, i wonder why Fischer would agree a draw so easily, any commenaries here?
Mar-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: With even material plus Bishops of opposite color, Fischer knew their game would Panno out into a draw ...

Such an early draw usually indicates their opponent stands better.

Mar-06-05  ArturoRivera: i mean agree the draw by playing Bxc5, cause the bishop pair is quiete and advantage in the endgame i think
Aug-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: I wouldn't be surprised if Bobby was somewhat low in time. Panno had actually outplayed him in the opening.
Aug-26-05  Runemaster: <Arturo> I'm very late in responding, but I've only just seen this game - <RookFile>'s post drew my attention to it. I think Fischer had to play 21.Bxc5, as the threat was 21...a4 trapping the bishop. If he plays 21.a3 or 21.a4 to give the bishop space to move, then it is unprotected and lost. If he moves the queen to free up the bishop, 21...Nxb3 wins a pawn.

After 21.Bxc5 Qxc5+ and perhaps 22.Qf2, the position does look drawish.

Fischer's plan, as he said, in the 1958 Interzonal, was to draw with the stronger players and beat the others, so he was probably happy enough with the result in this game.

There are some unusually (for him) short draws in that tournament, but then Fischer was only 15, playing in his first major international event - and his strategy worked well enough, as he qualified for the Candidates.

Aug-26-05  Shams: I've never liked to see 8...Qb6 in the dragon. Which is a better reply, 9.Bb3 or 9.Nf5?
Aug-26-05  Runemaster: <Shams> Don't know, sorry - you need to find a Dragon slayer to answer that one.
Aug-26-05  Dres1: Nf5 is bad and black just plays Qxb2
Aug-26-05  Shams: <Dres1> you're right, I was thinking of positions where black hadn't castled-- in that case white takes the dragon bishop with check and ends up down a pawn but with the bishop pair. Here it is simply bad. I need to spend a week and just learn every move-order trick in the dragon.
Sep-04-09  jerseybob: Shams: In lines where black plays d6(instead of 0-0) somewhere in his first 7 moves, 8..Qb6 is a known move and white can answer 9.Nf5 or Bb5. In this setting, 8.f3 is considered by some to be an error(Bb3 is recommended), and 8..Qb6! sets white some problems. Fischer does quite well to wiggle out. Did Panno miss a stronger line somewhere?
Sep-06-09  ToTheDeath: 9.Bb3 leads to equality with best play. Black does have ways to sharpen the play (14...Rfe8) but generally the line is drawish.
Sep-06-09  ToTheDeath: 9...Ng4!? is an interesting alternative.
Sep-09-09  jerseybob: Playing white I blundered into this line in a tournament game in 1970 before I'd ever seen Fischer-Panno. It went: 8.f3,Qb6 9.Bb5??!,Ne4?(Ng4!) 10.Nd5,Qc5 11.Nxc6,Qxb5 12.N6e7ch,Kh8 13.fxe4 and white won. In Fischer-Panno, your suggested 9..Ng4!? is the move I was thinking of too.
Feb-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: The way Soltis writes about this line (most recently in Chess Life, February 2012, p. 16), you get the impression that White is losing or very close to it after 8.f3 (his question mark) Qb6! Soltis likes 9...Ng4 better than Panno's 9...Nxe4. But if White knows what he's doing, he can draw after either move. Opening Explorer
Feb-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Donaldson and Silman in their 1998 book <Accelerated Dragons> give 9...Nxe4 an exclam, while Soltis gives it "?!" But in either event D & S say that 9.Bb3 gives White "a perfectly playable game!"
Dec-28-13  paulofx2071: why this game is in the notables games of Panno? why is special?

Now on DVD
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Interzonals 1958: Portoroz
by capybara
FISCHER VS PANNO
from ERPS's favorite games by ERPS
Accelerated Dragons
by Cannon Fodder


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC