chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Vladimir Kramnik vs Viswanathan Anand
Tal Memorial (2016), Moscow RUS, rd 4, Sep-30
Italian Game: Classical Variation. Giuoco Pianissimo Main line (C53)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 4 times; par: 71 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 195 more Kramnik/Anand games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-30-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: A good win for Kramnik but very passively played by Anand from about moves 20-40.
Sep-30-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Kramnik's first classical win over Anand in nearly 8 years: Kramnik vs Anand, 2008

According to the DB, this is their 182nd game of all types, which must be a record for first class players.

Sep-30-16  Pulo y Gata: Great game by Kramnik!
Sep-30-16  ewan14: Very nice

G.P. to Spanish like

Kramnik controls q.r. file

Sep-30-16  RookFile: Pretty smooth looking win from Kramnik!
Sep-30-16  Fanques Fair: Kraminik´s recent results have improved since he started playing 1-e4 from time to time, as in the old days.
Sep-30-16  CountryGirl: Anand seemed to have no plan or counter-play.
Oct-01-16  dnp: I was watching the game live yesterday evening, and I still can't see why Vlada played 47. K-g2 and not R-c7. I mean he took quite a bit of time to make his 47th move. Any ideas out there?
Oct-01-16  Ulhumbrus: 13 exd5 ?! concedes an advantage in space to Black although Black's centre may become a target instead of a weapon.

The computer prefers 13...Nxd5 to 13...Bxd5. One justification for the former is that it frees Black's f pawn to advance.

14 Ng3 attacks the square f5 whose defender - Black's QB - has been displaced by going to d5.

The computer prefers 14...Qd6 to 14...Bc5 and gives a repetition after 15 Ne4 Qe6 16 Ng3 Qd6. One justification for 14...Qd6 is that it connects the rooks. The text may be a deep and creative idea on Anand's part: It prepares the move ...g6 keeping the N on g3 out of f5 by transferring the bishop to f8. However for this to work, Black has to play the move ...g6. It also costs time.

15 b4 ?! gains space but also creates a target on b4 for Black's bishop.

17...b5? gives White control of the a file and this is going to lead in fact to the loss of the game. This may be Anand's first main mistake. Instead of this 17...Nd7 defends the e5 pawn.

18...Rb8 concedes the a file to White. 18...Bg7 seems consistent and on 19 Nc5 Nd7 attacks the N on c5.

20...Bxb3 draws White's queen on to the a2-g8 diagonal. Instead of this 20...Nb6 defends the bishop and threatens White's a4 pawn.

Instead of 21...Re6, 21...Qe7 prepares ...Qe6 removing White's queen from the a2-g8 diagonal.

Instead of 23...Nf6,23...Qe7 gets ready for ...Kh7 followed by ..f5

24...Nxe4 relinquishes Black's advantage in space. Now Kramnik has a considerable positional advantage. Black seems unable to cover all of his weak spots.

It may be not obvious why 33...Rc8? is an error.

The reason is that after 34 Qa2 White's rook will be able to threaten both Ra8 and Ra7.

In that case Black will want to be ready to obstruct White's rook by ...Rc8 or ...Rc7.

However White can prevent ...Rc7 by Bb6 and that means that the c file is inadequate as a means of defence for Black's rook: Black's rook needs to use the b file instead for this purpose.

This suggests 33...Qc8! 34 Qa2 Rb7 using the b file for Black's rook instead of the a file and now on Ra8 or Ra7 Black has ...Rb8 or ...Rb7. White's bishop cannot keep Black's rook out of b8 so easily.

Perhaps the move 33...Rc8? is Anand's proverbial second main mistake, leading to loss of the game. Although the computer indicates that White's advantage is not that great with best play even after this, the computer may be not as reliable in such positions.

Oct-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <I still can't see why Vlada played 47. K-g2 and not R-c7. I mean he took quite a bit of time to make his 47th move. Any ideas out there?>

According to the chess24 report, he said in the post-mortem with Shipov (http://livestream.com/ChessCast/eve...) that he was afraid Black might manage to mount some kind of fortress in the resulting queen vs. rook and bishop position. Instead he went for a quiet move, leaving his opponent to puzzle out what to do in what was almost zugzwang.

Oct-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <MissScarlett: Kramnik's first classical win over Anand in nearly 8 years: Kramnik vs Anand, 2008 According to the DB, this is their 182nd game of all types, which must be a record for first class players.>

Sigh. How soon they forget. 170 classical games between Karpov and Kasparov, and the rapids and blitzes worked out to be 23 more, for a total of 193, in the cg db.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

Oct-01-16  latvalatvian: There are two main reasons for a mistake:
1. you don't think enough
2. you think too much
Perhaps in the second case, you worry too much. If you worry to much you might move too quickly. But if you don't worry enough you might not see something. That's why so many chess positions are a catch 22.
Oct-01-16  Ulhumbrus: <latvalatvian> A third possible reason for making a mistake is that you have still a lot to learn
Oct-01-16  sanju1996d: kramnik's games make me realize how little I know about chess. legend!
Oct-01-16  dnp: aha, yes Eyal, thanks.
Oct-02-16  Everett: <Oct-01-16 Ulhumbrus: <latvalatvian> A third possible reason for making a mistake is that you have still a lot to learn>

Like the nuances of pushing g-pawns and such.

Nov-06-16  positionalgenius: Really, really smooth win here from Kramnik. Hard to do that against a player of Anand's caliber.
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Vladimir, the Conqueror
by Gottschalk
98_C50_ff_Giuoco Pianissimo - Killing them softl
by whiteshark


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC