chessgames.com
English (A10)
1 c4

Number of games in database: 4013
Years covered: 1851 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 34.6%
   Black wins 32.6%
   Draws 32.8%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Simon Kim Williams  32 games
Normunds Miezis  29 games
Jan Smejkal  29 games
Anthony Miles  53 games
Edvins Kengis  52 games
Jonathan Speelman  36 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Petrosian vs Botvinnik, 1963
Portisch vs I Radulov, 1969
Smyslov vs V Liberzon, 1969
E Nikolic vs Fischer, 1968
D Zagorskis vs Sadler, 1998
Psakhis vs Kasparov, 1990
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 page 1 of 161; games 1-25 of 4,013  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Horwitz vs Bird ½-½54 1851 LondonA10 English
2. Staunton vs Horwitz 0-194 1851 LondonA10 English
3. Staunton vs Horwitz ½-½35 1851 LondonA10 English
4. Wyvill vs Anderssen 0-127 1851 LondonA10 English
5. Wyvill vs Anderssen 1-049 1851 LondonA10 English
6. Loewenthal vs Harrwitz 0-141 1853 LondonA10 English
7. T Frere vs Paulsen 0-141 1857 New YorkA10 English
8. Owen vs Mongredien  1-063 1862 LondonA10 English
9. Owen vs Steinitz 1-061 1862 LondonA10 English
10. G MacDonnell vs Mackenzie ½-½37 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63A10 English
11. F Deacon vs Hannah  1-035 1862 LondonA10 English
12. S Solomons vs V Green 0-137 1862 LondonA10 English
13. S Solomons vs Mackenzie  0-133 1862 LondonA10 English
14. De Vere vs Steinitz  0-176 1867 ParisA10 English
15. Detroit vs New York Chess Club  ½-½43 1867 MatchA10 English
16. Stephenson vs E Schallopp  0-152 1868 Hamburg blindfold simulA10 English
17. R Hale vs A Burns 0-129 1868 Adelaide Chess Club v Melbourne Chess Club telegraph matchA10 English
18. S W Sedgefield vs A Burns  0-142 1868 MatchA10 English
19. A Johnston vs Mackenzie  0-131 1871 2nd American Chess CongressA10 English
20. Zukertort vs W Potter 1-027 1875 LondonA10 English
21. L Goldsmith vs C M Fisher 0-132 1875 Match-Game 12A10 English
22. H Davidson vs P Ware 0-149 1876 PhiladelphiaA10 English
23. M Judd vs H Davidson ½-½48 1876 PhiladelphiaA10 English
24. M Judd vs L D Barbour  1-028 1876 PhiladelphiaA10 English
25. J Bryning vs C E Ranken  1-026 1878 corr ttA10 English
 page 1 of 161; games 1-25 of 4,013  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-27-06  Albertan: TechN9ne: can anyone give a few modern day masters who regularly employ the english opening?

Hi TechN9ne. According to my chessbase program these modern day masters regularly employ the English Opening:

Evgeny Bareev,Vassily Ivanchuk,Boris Gelfand,Aleksey Bakutin,Klaus Bischoff, Normunds Miezis,Colin Anderson McNab,Anatoly Karpov, Mihai Suba, and Istvan Csom.

Sep-21-06  Kwesi: I started experimenting today with Tony Miles' 1.c4 b6!? on FICS and ended up with a nice win as black against a slightly higher rated opponent. <Any comments on the game would be very much appreciated>

[Event "FICS"]
[Site "FICS"]
[Date "2006.09.21"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "dragonneau"]
[Black "kwesiquest"]
[ECO "A10"]
[WhiteRating "1839"]
[BlackRating "1645"]

1. c4 b6
2. Nc3 e6
3. Nf3 Bb7
4. g3 Bxf3
5. exf3 Nf6
6. Bg2 c6
7. O-O Be7
8. d4 d5
9. cxd5 cxd5
10. Re1 O-O
11. Bg5 Nc6
12. Rc1 Ne8 <simplification provocation?>

13. Bxe7 Qxe7
14. Nxd5 Qd6
15. Rxc6 Qxd5
16. f4 Qxa2
17. Rcxe6 fxe6
18. Bxa8 Nc7
19. Bg2 Qxb2
20. Qc1 Qxc1
21. Rxc1 Nd5
22. Ra1 a5
23. Rb1 Rb8
24. Re1 Kf7
25. f5 Nc7
26. fxe6+ Nxe6
27. Bd5 Re8
28. Bc4 Kf6
29. Bb5 Rd8
30. Bd3 Rxd4
31. Bxh7 Ng5
32. Rb1 Nxh7
33. Rxb6+ Kf7
34. Rb7+ Kg6
35. Rb6+ Nf6
36. Ra6 Rd1+
37. Kg2 Ra1
38. h4 Kf5
39. Kh3 g5
40. hxg5 Kxg5
41. Ra7 Kf5
42. Rf7 Rh1+
43. Kg2 Rh7
44. Rf8 Ra7
45. g4+ Kg6
46. Kg3 a4
47. Rb8 a3
48. Rb1 a2
49. Ra1 Nd5
50. Kf3 Nb4
51. Ke4 Nc2
0-1

Sep-22-06  NateDawg: <Kwesi> Good game! According to analysis by Fritz 9 and Crafty 19.19, you played very well, with only the one main mistake (13...Qxe7?). However, you still had good counterplay, and played almost perfectly after that.

White might have tried 16. Qa4, holding on to the extra pawn. Also, 17. Rcxe6 was probably a mistake, trading Black's e-pawn for White's important b-pawn, which was needed to keep Black's queenside pawns at bay.

After trading queens, White still had a good chance for a draw. According to Fritz and Crafty, White's final major mistake was 29. Bb5??; better was 29. Re3, after which the position is even (-0.05). I don't really understand why, but endgames have never been my strongsuit =). After White's apparent blunder you efficiently reached a won position.

Sep-23-06  Kwesi: Thanks <NateDawg>! After 13...Qxe7 I thought I could get the pawn back but I missed 16.Qa4 :(
Jan-08-07  Silverstrike: Hello, this is a game I played almost a year ago in last april, I was black against the English and was looking for any thoughts on this game. Thanks in advance

White: Manojraja Natarajan (the same as Jamal M J Raja perhaps?) Black: Julius Schwartz
Event: Edinburgh Major (U-1700) 2006
Date: 2/4/'06
Round: 4
Board: 3
White ELO: 1627
Black ELO: -

1.c4 e5 2.g3 Nc6 3.Bg2 f5 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.d3 d6 6.e4 Be7 7.Nge2 0-0 8.0-0 Nh5 9.Nd5 g5 10.exf5 Bxf5 11.Nec3 Ng7 12.Ne4 h6 13.Be3 Ne6 14.h4 Kg7 15.Qd2 Kg6 16.Nxe7+ Qxe7 17.hxg5 hxg5 18.f3 Rh8 19.Nc3 Bh3 20.Ng5 Qg7 21.a3 Nd4 22.Qd1 Kf7 23.Kf2 Bxg2 24.Kxg2 Nf4+ 25.Nxf4 gxf4 26.Bf2 fxg3 27.Bxd4 Rh2+ 28.Kg1 g2 29.Kxh2 g1Q+ 30.Rxg1 Rh8#


click for larger view

An interesting feature is that both players have all of their pieces within their respective halves of the board!

I don't think that I played the opening particularly well, so I decided to go for broke with 8...Nh5 and 9...g5 etc. I think my opponent maybe could've exploited this better than he tried to. After that I attacked him and eventually won. All comments are welcome. I will post this game in the Kibitzer's Cafe aswell.

After winning this game I won the next against a 1688 rated player to take joint first place with 4.5/5.

Apr-27-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: hello all! what is the "GM" line in the English Defense (1.c4 b6). i'm curious in this line for both sides.

Thanks!

Jul-08-08  Cactus: <refutor> In my own experience at least, it tends to transpose into a Nimzo or Queen's Indian depending on white's play (e.g. 1.c4 b6 2.d4 e6 3.Nc3 or Nf3)
Feb-20-09  Pianoplayer: I love the english!
Feb-20-09  chessman95: I don't try this one very often: it looks a bit passive. This move dosn't help develop any peices and I find it annoying that often I can't pin black's knight on C6 because the pawn is in the way. Also, it immediatly tells black (unless the white player is crazy) that white will be castling on the king-side, so as black I usually start preparing an attack on that side of the board when my opponent uses the English. It dosen't encourage me to use it that the winning percentage for white and black is almost equal on this site.
Feb-26-09  ILikeFruits: i love...
the french...
Feb-26-09  I Like Fish: i love...
the birds...
the bees...
the flowers...
and...
the trees...
Feb-27-09  ILikeFruits: hello fish...
Feb-27-09  I Like Fish: La vie est vaine...
Un peu d'amour...
Un peu de haine...
Et puis bonjour...

La vie est brève...
Un peu d'espoir...
Un peu de rêve...
Et puis bonsoir...

Feb-27-09  ILikeFruits: are you...
french...
Feb-27-09  Open Defence: Oui...Oui....
Feb-28-09  ILikeFruits: wee...
wee...
Feb-28-09  I Like Fish: hello fruits...
I...
do not...
remember...
the exact...
words...

Ça promet...

Mar-09-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: <chessman95: I don't try this one very often: it looks a bit passive. This move dosn't help develop any peices and I find it annoying that often I can't pin black's knight on C6 because the pawn is in the way. Also, it immediatly tells black (unless the white player is crazy) that white will be castling on the king-side, so as black I usually start preparing an attack on that side of the board when my opponent uses the English. It dosen't encourage me to use it that the winning percentage for white and black is almost equal on this site.>

None of the hypermodern openings for White have fared too well at the top level the past few years. I suppose the English is the least 'hyper' of them.

Its a great opening if you have the positional touch - although its fun to compare how different players have worked it - Reti, Flohr, Botvinnik, Tal, Stein. Tal and Stein got some fairly lively games out of it...

Mar-10-09  chessman95: English Games are very active for such an 'anti-developmental' move, but I think the reason is more because black always gets crazy attacks on white than because white gets open peice play. Good for the defensive player!
Jun-02-09  ILikeFruits: i believe...
english is better...
than italian...
but french...
is better...
than sicilian...
which is...
also better...
than polish...
i like...
russian...
Jul-25-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Opening of the Day <Jaenisch Gambit <1.c4 b5>>

Opening Explorer

Mar-09-10  rapidcitychess: The English Bremen <1 c4 e5> is very good. I always play the Rossililomo reversed. My move order is <1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 e5 3 g3 Bb4!> Black takes a lot of drive out of the English without White's Queen Knight. If you remember, white can play 2 Bg5 in the dutch and do a lot of damage. If black tries the main line <1 c4 e5 2 Nc3 Bb4 3 Nd5! Be7 4 d4 d6 5 e4 Nf6! 6 Nxe7 Qxe7 7 f3>


click for larger view

/

May-12-10  Archswindler: <chessman95: English Games are very active for such an 'anti-developmental' move, but I think the reason is more because black always gets crazy attacks on white than because white gets open peice play. Good for the defensive player!>

I don't think you understand the English very well at all. If black is getting 'crazy attacks', it's because white is a patzer and is handling the opening wrong.

Mar-05-12  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Jaenisch Gambit
1.c4 b5


click for larger view

Sep-23-13  Kikoman:

<Opening of the Day>

Jaenisch Gambit

1. c4 b5


click for larger view

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