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Alekhine-Euwe 1937 Euwe vs Alekhine 1937
The Netherlands

Alexander Alekhine challenged Max Euwe to a rematch, and Euwe agreed to the challenge and the conditions. From October to December in 1937 the match was conducted, again in the Netherlands. If Alekhine had made the mistake of underestimating Euwe in 1935, he certainly did not underestimate him this time. Euwe won the first game with the white pieces, but in the end Alekhine's resolve (perhaps fueled by the 1935 defeat) proved to be too much for the Dutch Champion. After 25 games, with a score of +10 -4 =11, Alekhine gained the title for the second time.

After the match, Euwe wrote of his opponent with great admiration:

Alekhine's perfect technique and combinative talent are so well known that it is unnecessary to talk about them. His conduct of the endgame was shining. Even so, I admire most how he finished the adjourned games. I had to analyze them, too, so I know them well. When I think of how my opponent created ingenious ideas and how he finished them in unexpected ways, I have only the greatest admiration for Alekhine's playing style.[1]
This was Alekhine's final title match. He held the title of World Chess Champion until his death in 1946.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920
Alekhine01½½0111½1½½01½½0½½½
Euwe10½½1000½0½½10½½1½½½

click on a game number to replay game 2122232425
Alekhine11½11
Euwe00½00

FINAL SCORE:  Alekhine 15½;  Euwe 9½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Euwe-Alekhine 1937]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #6     Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937     1-0
    · Game #22     Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937     1-0
    · Game #2     Alekhine vs Euwe, 1937     1-0

FOOTNOTES

  1. World Chess Championship Index by Mark Weeks

 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-0501937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0411937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
3. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½601937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD46 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
4. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½271937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
5. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-0411937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD28 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
6. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0231937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
7. Euwe vs Alekhine 0-1341937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
8. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0261937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
9. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½411937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
10. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0401937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
11. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½301937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
12. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½261937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
13. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-0681937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
14. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0521937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE00 Queen's Pawn Game
15. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½621937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
16. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½651937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE02 Catalan, Open, 5.Qa4
17. Euwe vs Alekhine 1-0411937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
18. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½511937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD41 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
19. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½491937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
20. Alekhine vs Euwe ½-½411937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
21. Euwe vs Alekhine 0-1321937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE16 Queen's Indian
22. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0621937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchA09 Reti Opening
23. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½501937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE17 Queen's Indian
24. Alekhine vs Euwe 1-0411937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchD40 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
25. Euwe vs Alekhine 0-1431937Euwe - Alekhine World Championship RematchE46 Nimzo-Indian
 page 1 of 1; games 1-25 of 25  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Stonehenge: A minor detail: Fischer, Capablanca and Alekhine were professional chess players when they became world champion. Euwe wasn't.
Jan-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Out of curiosity, and at the risk of going slightly off-topic, what exactly were those two Fischer-Euwe games in 1957? An exhibition match?
Jan-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Itís well known that Alekhine was an alcohol addict. He was found drunk in a field prior to his World CH match in 1935. He quit drinking, got serious and demolished Euwe in the return match. Confirmed.>

No, it's not. There are claims that his drinking was out of control, unsubtantiated stories like the one you mention above, and counterclaims that alcohol wasn't such a problem for him. Nobody seems to know for sure.

<After Alekhine died the mantle of WC should have been passed to Euwe (many believed, following the historical tradition) and Euwe should have met the #2 in a match for the title. However, at that time Botvinnik did not have a good record against Euwe and did NOT want to face him in a match. Euwe-Botvinik score pre-war games was +2=3.>

I'm sure Petrosianic knows way more about the 1948 championship than you do, since he's written a lot about it, citing contemporaneous sources, which you have not done. Since no one had ever died while holding the title, there was no "historical tradition" either way concerning Euwe's status.

I don't remember how much thought was given to a Botvinnik-Euwe match, but I suspect not much. Given Euwe's performance in the 1948 match-tournament, there's no reason to suppose he was of world championship caliber at the time.

Jan-09-18  Petrosianic: <beatgiant> <What exactly were those two Fischer-Euwe games in 1957? An exhibition match?>

Yeah, basically an exhibition. Euwe was in town and Fischer was a promising young prodigy, so someone got them together. Euwe won the first game and gave a draw in a superior position in the second one.

It was funny. The first game was published and annotated, but not the second. You'd think it would be huge news that this 13 year old prodigy had drawn a game with an ex-world champion, but the moves were never published, in either Chess Life or Chess Review, only the result, and the game was considered lost for years. It turned up a couple of years ago, and it's not that bad. Fischer isn't blatantly crushed or busted, or anything, but I guess they didn't want people analyzing it and concluding that he should have lost.

Jan-09-18  Petrosianic: <I don't remember how much thought was given to a Botvinnik-Euwe match, but I suspect not much.>

Not much, although the idea was floated of naming him as interim World Champion until an actual event could be held. I believe that he may even have been named World Champion for about a half hour or so before they reversed it. (Not positive about that, however).

Jan-09-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Winter's article on the road to the match-tournament. As far as the subject under discussion is concerned, Znosko-Borovsky wrote an article arguing that Euwe should be restored to the title and he should then play a match with Botvinnik, but FIDE seems to have never seriously considered the idea.

Jan-09-18  Petrosianic: There's a certain logic (and precedent) for giving Euwe the title. Not so much for giving Botvinnik the title <shot>. Yes, he had an arrangement with Alekhine to play a title match, but that was between Botvinnik and Alekhine, not Botvinnik and FIDE. There were lots of other credible challengers, and simply handing the title shot to one of them because that's what Alekhine did doesn't make much sense. (Especially considering how badly out of favor Alekhine was at the time over his wartime activities).
Jan-09-18  Petrosianic: I wonder how long Salo Flohr remained FIDE's "Official Challenger"? They must have rescinded it at some point, unless they just forgot about it.
Jan-10-18  Lambda: <That may possibly have shaved several years off Capablanca's reign as well. Or who knows? Without WWI, Lasker might have played Capa earlier and beat him.>

Yes. Without WWI, Capablanca might have had five odd years more as champion, or alternatively, might never have become champion (since you can easily imagine Lasker going into semi-retirement for several years after winning a match). I have absolutely no idea who would have won a match taking place in around 1916, but I really wish it had happened.

Jan-10-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < Lambda: <That may possibly have shaved several years off Capablanca's reign as well. Or who knows? Without WWI, Lasker might have played Capa earlier and beat him.> Yes. Without WWI, Capablanca might have had five odd years more as champion, or alternatively, might never have become champion (since you can easily imagine Lasker going into semi-retirement for several years after winning a match). I have absolutely no idea who would have won a match taking place in around 1916, but I really wish it had happened.>

Me too, especially if it occurred as a corollary of World War I not taking place. Now that's a two-fer!

Jan-10-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: They don't make history like that no more ;)
Jan-11-18  Howard: As far as any allegations of Flohr being an "official challenger" for the WC, his dead-last finish at AVRO probably torpedoed that notion for good.
Jan-11-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: FIDE, not Flohr, was the official challenger for the WC, but Alekhine's victory in 1937 match torpedoed that notion for good, well, 9 years.
Jan-11-18  Petrosianic: No, Flohr was still "Official Challenger" after AVRO. Not sure for how long, though. You're confusing who FIDE considered the Official Challenger with who Alekhine considered.
Jan-15-18  GT3RS: <keypusher>

<I'm sure Petrosianic knows way more about the 1948 championship than you do, since he's written a lot about it, citing contemporaneous sources, which you have not done. >

Oh snap. I see citing obvious stuff (on internet) makes you more credible. Sorry breh. Still learning.

<Since no one had ever died while holding the title, there was no "historical tradition" either way concerning Euwe's status.>

After Alekhine's death, many were of the quite reasonable opinion that, following "historical tradition", Euwe, as the only living ex-champion, should be proclaimed champion; then a challenger should be identified (the Americans suggested Reshevsky) and a match held between them. Makes perfect sense to me.

FIDE, which for the first time had the opportunity to take charge of the world championship, even managed to take this decision at its congress in The Hague (1947).

But Euwe remained world champion for only two hours, until the Soviet delegation appeared in the hall, led by grandmaster Ragozin, "Botvinnik's close friend" and trainer, soon to become FIDE VicePresident. And that's how they suggested the five cycle tournament.

~ From Kasparov's book (my great predecessors)

And as I have said earlier match play and tournament play are different.

Of course it doesn't matter now does it. Everyone who knows a thing about chess history knows Botvinnik/ Euwe etc are arguably the weakest champions and will always be beneath the other greats.

Jan-15-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <GT3RS....I see youíve ignored most of my points and gone off track spewing unnecessary drivel....>

The drivel here emanates from you.

<....Absolute last post as I canít stand your stupidity.>

On top of your utter inability to argue your case in any sort of cogent fashion, you have proven yourself a liar.

Jan-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <GT3RS: ...Everyone who knows a thing about chess history knows Botvinnik/ Euwe etc are arguably the weakest champions ...>

<Arguably> is the important word. It's an opinion.

BTW, who are the <etc>?

Jan-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Retireborn: <Offramp> etc = Karpov and Anand, judging by his earlier list.
Jan-16-18  PhilFeeley: Botvinnik a weak champion? That's why they named a chess school tradition after him, right?

As for "everyone", well, not me.

Jan-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: So <GT3RS> is saying, "It is possible to argue that Botvinnik, Euwe, Anand & Karpov were among the weakest of the 16 World Chess Champions".

It is a bit of a bland statement.

Jan-16-18  Howard: Karpov?! One of "the weakest of the 16 WC"s" ?!

If that's not totally ludicrous, then I dunno what is!

Jan-16-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <GT3RS>

<Oh snap. I see citing obvious stuff (on internet) makes you more credible. Sorry breh. Still learning.

<Since no one had ever died while holding the title, there was no "historical tradition" either way concerning Euwe's status.>

After Alekhine's death, many were of the quite reasonable opinion that, following "historical tradition", Euwe, as the only living ex-champion, should be proclaimed champion; then a challenger should be identified (the Americans suggested Reshevsky) and a match held between them. Makes perfect sense to me.

FIDE, which for the first time had the opportunity to take charge of the world championship, even managed to take this decision at its congress in The Hague (1947).

But Euwe remained world champion for only two hours, until the Soviet delegation appeared in the hall, led by grandmaster Ragozin, "Botvinnik's close friend" and trainer, soon to become FIDE VicePresident. And that's how they suggested the five cycle tournament.>

If youíre genuinely curious about what happened back then, you should read the Winter link I posted.

If you want no one to take you seriously, cite OMGP as a reliable historical source.

Sep-15-19  Chesgambit: 1939-1945 WWII starts delayed world championship matches
Jun-17-20  Poulsen: <Howard>< Karpov?! One of "the weakest of the 16 WC"s" ?! If that's not totally ludicrous, then I dunno what is!>

Agreed. Karpov was actually one of the strongest players of all time - possibly only surpassed by Kasparov.

List of top performances +2800, pre year 2005 (Jeff Sonas):

1. Kasparov 34
2. Karpov 21
3. Lasker 12
4. Botvinnik 7
5. Alekhine, Fischer 6
7. Capablanca, Tal 4
9. Spassky 3
10. Steinitz, Smyslov, Petrosian 2
11. Euwe 0

Kasparov and Karpov stands heads and shoulders above the rest. Of course some of the pre-ww2 guys were hampered by fewer tournaments.

By 2005 Anand already had 7 +2800 performances, and including his later results we are bound to find him among the very best ever. Kramnik had 3 +2800 performances by 2005.

Strenght can be measured in many ways. Euwe may be considered the weakest of all WCh, but he was certainly among the very best in the 20'es and 30'es.

Jun-17-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Petrosianic....We seem to have established that GT3RS has no grasp of time, and so seems to have chopped the facts to make Botvinnik look <weaker> by virtue of holding the title longer, which is hilariously counter-intuitive....>

This reasoning would also, therefore, render Steinitz, Lasker and Kasparov the 'weakest' players to hold the supreme title and make Tal, Smyslov and Euwe the greatest.

Classic.

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