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Richard Teichmann vs Aron Nimzowitsch
Karlsbad (1911), Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) AUH, rd 8, Aug-31
Philidor Defense: General (C41)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Feb-03-10  Rama: Why not 51. ... Nf3+, 52. Kg5 Nxd4, 53. cxd4 Bc2. The ending looks playable even if the B must eventually sac itself to prevent a Queening, since white now has pawn weaknesses.
Apr-02-10  ozmikey: A cute story about this game in Edward Winter's latest column - http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...
Apr-02-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: 35...g6 and 36...h5 look pointless. I ran it through Fritz and he doesn't care for it, but that's not where Black lost the game.
Apr-02-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Whew, moving along, if I'd been a spectator, I'd have been yelling at Nimzo "Play h4 for crying out loud!" What an odd decision after moving the g and h Pawns from their starting squares.

Fritz doesn't fault Bc2 too much, bad as it looks. 44..Ne4 was a pointless provocation. Black certainly didn't have the advantage to pursue an attack. 55...Ke7 is an obvious blunder. I am going to let Fritz chew on 55...Kg8 for a while. Not sure Black can hold it anyway.

Apr-02-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <ozmikey: A cute story about this game in Edward Winter's latest column>

I cannot find Edward Winter in the player directory, only William Winter.

Apr-02-10  BobCrisp: There you go, kid: Edward Winter
Apr-02-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <BC> Danke Schoen! Now if only I could click on the player directory, and then the letter "W", and then scroll down to find him...
Nov-20-10  bystander: This is the second illustrative game in My System from Nimzowitsch. Between move 11 and 30 Nimzowitch uses this game as an example (from the black point of view) for the attack against white's pawn on e4 (restraint e4 after surrendering the centre with 10...ed4x) and blacks' outpost Ne5
Nov-20-10  bystander: I do not understand why white played 9) Bb3. After 9...ed4x 10) Nd4x Nc5 and if white don not want to exchange, then the bishop has to move again. Maybe 9) Ba2 (black cannot attack the bisshop there) or 9)Rd1.
Nov-22-10  bystander: Maybe 18)a5,Nd7 19)Na4,Be7 and 20) Rad1?
Nov-22-10  bystander: Maybe 19)Bg5, f6 20) Be3, Ne5 21)b3? Or 19)...Nf6x, 20)Bf6x, gf6x 20)Kh1; 19)..Be7 is not good; 20)Be7x, Re7x, 21) Nf5.
Nov-23-10  bystander: Nimzowitch comments on 20)..f6. "Look how the e-pawn is restricted more and more."

That might be very true, but the move also restricts the movement of Bf8 and does look a little passive to me.

What about 20)..Nc4, 21)Qc1, Qc5 (to prepare d5 or f5; according to Nimzowitch must black restrict and attack white's centrepawn on e4; this move als threats also QB6 or a kingside attack) 22) Nce2, d5 23) ed5x, Rd5x 24)b3 with better play for black?

Nov-25-10  bystander: Nimzowitch on 26... fe4x "Premature. The correct idea was first to play 26) ...Rde8 27) ef5x Bf5x 28) Nf5x Qf5x 29) Bg3 Te1x 30) Te1x Te1x 31) Qe1x Qc2x."

In this varation white is one pawn down and black has an advantage.

What about 26) ...Rde8 27) ef5x, Bf5x 28) Nf5x, Qf5x 29) Te7x Te7x 30) Bg3 d5 31) Qd2? But black still has an advantage.

Dec-11-11  fetonzio: damn nice ending
Apr-09-14  paramount: at the end of the game, i dont say that white wouldnt win.

But the simple mistake black did was 55...Ke7.

Had Nimzo did 55...Kg8, it would have been much harder to white to utilize his advantage, and probably it would have been a draw.

On My System, Nimzo annotates this game step by step but it just explain the tip of the iceberg, it is not comprehensive. And he didnt point out at all the mistake of 55...Ke7.

Again, I dont say that with Kg8 white wouldnt wouldnt, just much much much harder. And i dont see the winning line there.

Apr-07-15  abstract: Its always enjoyable to see nimzowitch losing
May-18-15  Oliveira: <paramount: Had Nimzo did 55...Kg8, it would have been much harder to white to utilize his advantage, and probably it would have been a draw.>

Not sure about the draw. It would appear that Teichmann had but to use the same winning manoeuvre. After 56.♗e5! (crippling restriction of Black's Knight!--I think Nimzo might have said something like that...), I don't really see how Black could prevent White from continuing with g7-♘g6-♘e7.

<bystander: I do not understand why white played 9) Bb3. After 9...ed4x 10) Nd4x Nc5 and if white don not want to exchange, then the bishop has to move again. Maybe 9) Ba2 (black cannot attack the bisshop there) or 9)Rd1.>

Well, I suppose it doesn't make that big a difference. I mean, at that point, both sides had finished the opening already, and the game had gotten into a quiet, slow positional battle with not many prospects for both sides. With that in mind, it does not really hurt to have to move the same Bishop again in case that Knight goes to c5, as it in fact did. Actually, it sort of makes the task of having to find a move somewhat easier, and that Knight on c5 is not particularly great. Besides, at the 9th move, the Bishop does seem a little better positioned at b3 than a2, having a bit more flexibility and not interfering with the Rook's support to the a-pawn.

May-18-15  Oliveira: This has gotten to be one of the most boring games ever played. However, it arouses quite some interest on knowing the circumstances involving the encounter. Apparently due to their previous quibble, Teichmann seems to have been decided not to lose, while Nimzo was smelling blood, or it so it would appear looking at how ridiculously he played that drawn endgame.

Thanks for User: ozmikey for calling attention to Edward Winter's Chess Note #6515. Nimzowitsch’s invention:

<International tournament play is not without its humorous side. The opening of the congress at Carlsbad witnessed a slight between Teichmann, who, though the best of sportsmen, invariably insists upon his rights to the last letter, and Niemzowitsch, who is classed as an eccentric. The latter, according to the London Field, provided himself with a novel contrivance, consisting of an implement shaped like a four-in-hand whip of spiral wire, adjusted to the table with thumbtacks. There was also a patent pencilholder, and the young Russian was proportionately proud of his invention. All of the masters examined the contraption with deep interest and not with little amusement. Teichmann was the exception. He declared with emphasis that the Russian’s scoring method was open to objection. For this the Field offers no particular reason. Teichmann was only placated by the concession that he would be entitled to score his moves on a typewriter machine the day he was paired with Niemzowitsch. Inasmuch as the pair met in the eighth round and Teichmann won the game, it would appear that the odds were with the typewriter.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 7 September 1911.>

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

May-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: I would have thought the date was April 1st.

Can that possibly be true?! If so, it's utterly hilarious.

May-19-15  Oliveira: Oh, you better believe it, my good <Zanzibari>. No anecdote can be too far-fetched when "the eccentric" Nimzowitsch was around. By the way, have you ever read Hans Kmoch reminiscences about Nimzo? It makes stuff like this sound just like another run-of-the-mill story.

Plus, chess players aren't exactly your average neighbour. I ran across this story the other day: Sultan Khan vs Marshall, 1930

May-19-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Another good one. I'd like to see your question answered.

Although I am a little skeptical about the Marshall story - since from all I've read Sultan Khan was utterly imperturbable at the board, handling every move with equal aplomb. But, let's keep an open mind.

(I do so utterly like the word, utterly!)

The story here reads like something out of a Monty Python skit - where a chess player lugs an old Remington manual typewriter to the board in order to keep his scoresheet.

But I researched it a little more, and apparently Nimzo's pen idea utterly failed to be adopted by chessplayers. However, it has found almost universal usage in banks:

http://www.newsbiscuit.com/images/2...

(Superglue was another of Nimzo's inventions - which he only used against the most scurrilous of opponents:

http://imgs.xkcd.com/chesscoaster/x...)

May-19-15  Oliveira: Now I'm utterly flabbergasted.
May-19-15  Oliveira: Aha! Nimzowitsch came up with his funny invention because he was constantly missing his pen.

Take a look at "Aron Nimzowitsch: On the Road to Chess Mastery, 1886-1924" by Per Skjoldager and Jørn Erik Nielsen.

<The Wiener Schachzeitung gave a very detailed report from the tournament, day by day, and round by round. One of the daily reports contained the following story involving Nimzowitsch as the main character:

TUESDAY 22 AUGUST

The interest from numerous local and foreign chess friends appeared to be mainly focusing on the masters whose sonorous names—like Schlechter, Marshall and Rubinstein — have enjoyed worldwide reputation for years. But the other players of the tournament were also indeed quietly honored and admired. One table in particular seemed to exercise a powerful force of attraction. A metal scaffold that looked like a small gallows leapt to the eye even from a distance, but when approaching it, one of those hanging devices emerged to which it is the newest fashion to fasten a pencil. This apparatus is refreshing for absent-minded people who never know whether they must look for their pencil in their bag, behind their left or their right ear or perhaps in their bushy hair. And master Nimzowitsch, the owner of the stand, is the ingenious Russian who needs it enthroned on this table most urgently because his absentmindedness is almost as great as his Genius. He always seems to have a faraway look into his eyes and when he returns, the pencil has disappeared without trace. Precious minutes are lost when looking for it and how easily could this not cause the loss of the game due to time trouble? Now this danger is eliminated. The awareness that the pencil is always within reach, gives our Maestro a peace and a confidence which must fill his opponents with misgiving. Rabinowitsch was the victim yesterday. This excellent expert from Vilnius had defended himself brilliantly and, although having Black, almost obtained a superior position. This position however, gradually evaporated and Nimzowitsch won the game after a most exciting and instructive fight that lasted for about six hours [Wiener Schachzeitung, 1911, page 269; author's translation].>

pp. 148-49: https://books.google.com.br/books?i...

Erratum: When transcribing the item from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, I skipped the word <clash>: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

<The opening of the congress at Carlsbad witnessed a slight clash between Teichmann, who, though the best of sportsmen, invariably insists upon his rights to the last letter, and Niemzowitsch, who is classed as an eccentric.>

Jul-12-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  SpaceRunner: bystander
Nimzowitch on 26... fe4x "Premature. The correct idea was first to play 26) ...Rde8 27) ef5x Bf5x 28) Nf5x Qf5x 29) Bg3 Te1x 30) Te1x Te1x 31) Qe1x Qc2x."

In this varation white is one pawn down and black has an advantage.

What about 26) ...Rde8 27) ef5x, Bf5x 28) Nf5x, Qf5x 29) Te7x Te7x 30) Bg3 d5 31) Qd2? But black still has an advantage.

..26...Queen f6 with idea of pushing g -pawn! Getting som space!?

Nov-09-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  dernier loup de T: Oliveira, about the position after 55...Kg8 56. Be5! The idea is brilliant; anyway, I obtained a wonderful endgame, still winned by White, when analyzing the possibilities after 56. Be5 Nd2 57. Kg5!....
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