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David Bronstein vs Ernst Rojahn
"Rojahn, Gosh!" (game of the day Aug-11-2012)
Moscow ol (Men) qual-A (1956), Moscow URS, rd 5, Sep-05
Italian Game: Two Knights Defense. Polerio Defense Kieseritsky Variation (C58)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Aug-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: The GMs don't play Cochrane gambit against the Petroff. Of course, they aren't Bronstein....
Aug-11-12  triangulation: nice to see a pun referring to an Indian dish. put a smile on my face.
Aug-11-12  newzild: <HeMateMe: The GMs don't play Cochrane gambit against the Petroff. Of course, they aren't Bronstein....>

Topalov vs Kramnik, 1999

Aug-11-12  DanielBryant: Well, I've never heard of this Indian dish before, but I do like that this site doesn't shy away from some of the most obscure puns. I learned something new today as a result.
Aug-11-12  Abdel Irada: I had to smile at the timing: Just before I looked at this game, I'd cooked and eaten an Indian casserole — not Rogan Josh, but still....
Aug-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <FSR> Here's another wonderful light-squared bishop, buried by a brick wall of White pawns (Capablanca vs Bogoljubov, 1922).
Aug-11-12  Cemoblanca: After 28.e6! the board looks like "The Great Pyramid of Giza"! :D I haven't seen a pawn structure like this before! Amazing game & instincts by Mr. Bronstein! Bravo! :0)
Aug-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < Checkmate4327: John Emms....gives these variations: 8...Nxc4 9 Qe2 (9 Qd4 Nd6! 10 Nc3 c6 11 0-0 cxd5 12 e5 Nf5 13 Qd3 Ne4 14 Nxd5 Nc5 Bronstein-Ra.Gracia, Mar De Plata Z 1969.) 9...Nb6 10 c4 Bb4+ 11 Kf1 0-0 12 a3 Re8 13 e5 Bf8 14 h3 c6 15 Be3 Nxc4! 16 Qxc4 Nxd5 De Zeeuw-Timmerman, Dutch Cht 1992.>

Here are the games quoted (it's Luis Bronstein as White, not the GM).

http://www.365chess.com/view_game.p...

M De Zeeuw vs G Timmerman, 1992

Aug-11-12  backrank: <Cemoblanca: After 28.e6! the board looks like "The Great Pyramid of Giza"! :D I haven't seen a pawn structure like this before! Amazing game & instincts by Mr. Bronstein! Bravo! :0)>


click for larger view

Aug-11-12  Cemoblanca: <backrank> Aaahhhhhh... What a beautiful view! Looks like a postcard! ;0)
Aug-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: An astonishing game. When you see the fun that white had with his strong pawn centre, sacrificing a piece doesn't seem too high a price to pay.
Aug-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The pawns truly win this one...and win it big!
Aug-11-12  waustad: Perhaps we could call him Bruschetta - Italian toast. I'll admit that I always considered the Italian to include 3.) ... Bc5, but here they seem to include the 2 Ns.
Aug-11-12  waustad: I've heard of the Great Snake variation, but this is a boa constrictor.
Aug-11-12  howlwolf: I think if black plays 20..f6 he may have less of a problem keeping his white square bishop useful and in a few moves his game can become almost comfortable:Possible line 21f4 Qe7 22 e5 fe 23fe Rfl 24 Nf1 Re8 black has defensive resources because of his extra piece, he certainly doesn't mind exchanging pieces or opening lines and if he can blockake or disrupt the white center pawns or use the extra piece to attack whites' weakened kingside I think he can generate substantial drawing and possible winning chances. Thoughts, anyone?
Aug-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: The "pyramid" was completed in A Pokorny vs K Kullberg, 1930, after <27.e6>:


click for larger view

Same result, as you might expect. And Bird once got into a similar fix in Bird vs Gunsberg, 1889, after <58...f4+>:


click for larger view

He couldn't figure a way out, either. And if Bird couldn't figure a way out, there wasn't one.

Of course, you can't go too far into this theme without bringing up Judit Polgar vs Bacrot, 1999, after <50...d3>:


click for larger view

Perhaps the most amazing example of all.

Aug-11-12  backrank: N Birnboim vs Dzindzichashvili, 1977

after 27 f5


click for larger view

If <PhonyBenoni> hadn't provided a couple of even better examples, I would consider this one rather good :)

Aug-11-12  Cemoblanca: <Phony Benoni> Perfect! ;0)
Aug-12-12  jusmail: What is the idea behind 31.Kh1?
Aug-13-12  backrank: A bit late, but now I've discovered this one:

Petrosian vs Petrovsky, 1946

Position after 21 b4:


click for larger view

May-11-13  Poisonpawns: i had so much trouble finding this due to an alternate spelling of the black players last name. I had it as Bronstein-Roian Moscow 1956
May-11-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Poisonpawns> In the good old days, you'd have had a barrel of laughs with Informator's spelling of Korchnoi (Korcnoj), to name only one.
Feb-17-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: A brilliantly creative game!
Jul-22-17  Saniyat24: One of the funniest puns (if you know that Rogan Josh is a lamb dish), that I have come across, and an amazing game, especially the middle game after 24.f4, how Bronstein squeezed his opponent was something very special indeed...!
Feb-20-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Cemoblanca> After 28.e6! the board looks like "The Great Pyramid of Giza"!>

Too bad that Kasparov was not playing White. Then the game could have been titled "The Great Pyramid of Gazza".

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