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Robert James Fischer vs Samuel Reshevsky
Fischer - Reshevsky (1961), Los Angeles, CA USA, rd 6, Jul-30
Sicilian Defense: Old Sicilian. Open (B32)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-18-05  JohnnyRambo: I believe that Reshevsky basically invented the ...Ng4 idea in this variation of the opening, and this weapon was one of the reasons why Fischer was not able to pull ahead of him during their match.
Mar-20-05  RookFile: I think this match shows how
dangerous Reshevsky would have
been in a match against Botvinnik.
( By the way, they actually played
a small match, and Reshevsky WON,
2.5 to 1.5 ). The opening was
Reshevsky's weak point. But when
he knew who his opponent was going
to be for the next 10 to 20 games,
Reshevsky was quite capable of booking
up on the likely openings, and coming
up with terrific ideas.... like the
...Ng4 idea he used with such success
in his match against Fischer.
Oct-10-10  Xeroxx: Fischer didn't play Nezhmetdinovs move.
Oct-10-10  Peter Nemenyi: This uneventful game isn't in MSMG, of course, but Fischer mentions it in his notes to the second game of the match, claiming that he had a "clear advantage" after both 10. Qh4 here and 10. Qd1 in the fourth game.

How he played the advantage into a sterile draw in fifteen moves, he doesn't say. MSMG contains quite a few comments in which RJF claims that he was better out of the opening in games he drew or lost. His total belief in his own opening choices was a great asset, but sometimes it warred with his objectivity.

Oct-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: If one side has a backward, isolated pawn, why not play on a few moves?
Oct-11-10  AnalyzeThis: At least one pair of rooks will come off on the c file (black would double there and own the file if white lets him). Fischer must have figured that black's powerful centralized queen and the fact that white still needs to waste a tempo at some point with with something like h3 (avoiding back rank mate ideas) gives Reshevsky full equality.
Oct-14-10  Peter Nemenyi: That's a good rationalization of why White accepted the draw, but still one imagines that the Fischer of ten years later would have chosen to grind on with his microscopic advantage, at least until the time control. It's particularly odd that RJF took the quick draw given that he'd won the previous game, and so had Reshevsky in a dangerous position in terms of match strategy and psychology, trailing by a point and needing to defend himself with Black after a loss. In the next game, by contrast, Fischer played a bad attacking move in the opening when something simpler would have given him "clear equality" (Mednis), and lost quickly, so that the aborted match ended in an informal tie. Apparently the teenage Bobby lacked the perfect instinct for when to go for the kill that he developed later.
Oct-15-10  Petrosianic: <If one side has a backward, isolated pawn, why not play on a few moves?>

In a heavy piece ending, that's not as big a disadvantage. There are no minors to probe, and no way for White to advance pawns to create further weaknesses.

Jul-13-12  Zugzwangovich: In the 1965 edition of "Profile of a Prodigy", Frank Brady says of White's 12th, "Most interesting at this point is the speculative sacrifice 12.QxB!? which gives White a very strong attack." Aside from the fact that such speculative moves were anethema to Fischer, is this a valid statement or one of Dr. Brady's "wholly unsubstantiated claims" to which Larry Evans referred?
Jul-13-12  Shams: <Zugzwangovich> After this game was played but before Brady wrote those words, a famous game was played in that line: Nezhmetdinov vs O Chernikov, 1962
Jul-13-12  unferth: <HeMateMe: If one side has a backward, isolated pawn, why not play on a few moves?>

<Petrosianic: In a heavy piece ending, that's not as big a disadvantage. There are no minors to probe, and no way for White to advance pawns to create further weaknesses.>

the technique I learned years ago for exploiting a backward isolani was for the attacker to trade OFF all the minors, pile up his pieces on the pawn's file, and then win it by advancing his own pawn to exploit the inevitable pin on a defensive heavy piece. could Fischer not have tried Re3/d3-f4-e5 etc.?

Jul-13-12  gezafan: Reshevsky was able to play this accelerated Dragon because Fischer was disinclined to play the Maroczy variation (c4), which gives white an advantage.

I think black, more or less, equalizes in the variations played by Reshevsky.

This game shows that Fischer was usually willing to accept a shattered pawn structure for the 2 bishops. The last game of his match with Spassky is another example.

Jul-13-12  Zugzwangovich: <shams> Thank you very much for that information!
Jan-18-13  RookFile: Nobody had more of a talent for grinding out small advantages than Fischer. If he took a draw, it's because there's nothing to see here and time to move it along.

Naturally everybody looks at the d pawn, but how do you make progress with white? Advance the kingside pawns? - That comes with risk in a major piece ending where often king safety trumps all other considerations.

I think Fischer did the right thing by taking the draw here.

Jan-18-13  RookFile: <unferth: then win it by advancing his own pawn to exploit the inevitable pin on a defensive heavy piece. could Fischer not have tried Re3/d3-f4-e5 etc.?>

Ok, let's give this the benefit of every doubt, and assume that somehow you win the d pawn. Being a pawn down is not the end of the world, which anybody who plays the Marshall Gambit can tell you. A probem with this as white is that as soon as you move that f pawn, you leave the 2nd rank vulnerable. It requires no great deal of imagination to see a rook coming to c2 and a queen lined up somewhere against g2 in order for black to generate dangerous threats.

I think Reshevsky would be happy to have the black pieces in such a situation.

Mar-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Here is a picture of this game, just after 10...Qa5:

http://www.worldchesshof.org/upload...

Mar-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <zanzibar: Here is a picture of this game, just after 10...Qa5: http://www.worldchesshof.org/upload...

Just a quibble, but it's after 12.Qg4, no? Sammy is on the clock.

Thanks for this picture. Somehow I pictured a slightly grander setting for this match.

This is an interesting and surprising (to me) game. Can Black really get away with 16....Bxc3? I'm sure Reshevsky knew what he was doing, though. I agree with those who say older Fischer would have played on in the final position.

Mar-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: <Keypusher> Ha, you may be right. I just blindly copied the original caption from where I found it.

Yes, the setting was somewhat dinky, stuck in a corner.

http://www.worldchesshof.org/upload...

The caption for this photo said just after 12.Qg4.

Mar-27-15  Everett: <Thanks for this picture. Somehow I pictured a slightly grander setting for this match.>

Perhaps there are diamond-filled chandeliers and fire-breathing Dragons just outside the frame...

Jun-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  berbanz: Sanguan-Sol Cruz in Manuel M Lopez Cup 2012 continued with 8 OO.
Jun-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <berbanz: Sanguan-Sol Cruz in Manuel M Lopez Cup 2012 continued with 8 OO.>

Nobody cares.

Jun-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <keypusher> The only surprise is that <rjsolcruz> is not posting--must be a shill of some sort.
Sep-17-18  Petrosianic: <unferth>: <the technique I learned years ago for exploiting a backward isolani was for the attacker to trade OFF all the minors, pile up his pieces on the pawn's file, and then win it by advancing his own pawn to exploit the inevitable pin on a defensive heavy piece. could Fischer not have tried Re3/d3-f4-e5 etc.?>

Sometimes that works. Take a look at Game 9 of the 1981 Championship Match for a good example of it working.

In this case, I think the problem is that White would have to expose his own King too much to make the advance. Also that Black doesn't really end up tied to the d pawn. White has to play f3, Re3, and Rd3 to build up on it, and on that time, Black plays Rfc8 threatening Rc2 with counterplay. He'd probably end up abandoning the d pawn and getting something else while White is grabbing it.

This might be a good ending to try playing out, though, just to see the nuances.

Sep-23-18  Howard: Game 9 of the 1981 match was certainly an exemplary example of Karpov's technique.

And his 7th move was rather profound I thought.

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