chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

There is a clue unsolved right now on the Holiday Contest Clues Page!   [Official Contest Rules]
Please see this announcement for some updates.
(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Garry Kasparov vs Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian
Moscow (1981), Moscow URS, rd 8, Apr-14
Queen's Indian Defense: Kasparov-Petrosian Variation. Petrosian Attack (E12)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 43 times; par: 69 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 4 more Kasparov/Petrosian games
sac: 39...Qxh6 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: To flip the board (so black is on the bottom) press the "I" key on your keyboard.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-21-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: As Kasparov said 35f6! wins. Showtime 35..Qf7 36.Qxe5 Re8 (36...Qg6 37.Rxb6! Qxh6 Qe7+!!) 37.Qg5 Qg6 38Rf5! to show some variations
Feb-21-03  ughaibu: Kasparov was a great admirer of Petrosian though he claimed his play was mainly influenced by Alekhine, Botvinnik, Tal and Fischer.
Feb-24-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: Ughaibu I can imagine Kasparov admire Petrosian. Above variations have a forcing nature by the way and that can go on for a few moves more.
Mar-22-03  skakmiv: Why not 36.Qxe7 Kxe7 37.Rxa4?
Mar-22-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: You mean < 37.Qxe7 >. Thats a good question. < 37.Qxe7 Kxe7 38. Rxa4 Rd6 > is not promising for white. At move 40 Kasparov missed the simple <40...Qc1+> because the board was too big.
Aug-15-03  tud: What about 35f6 Be8 and black changes the direction ?
Aug-15-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Even the greatest can look like a patzer. This is a prime example.
Aug-16-03  tud: Ok, after 35 ... Be8 36 f7 wins, I guess
Nov-16-04  Hidden Skillz: i was also thinkin about 36.Qxe7 Kxe7 etc..but that leaves black with a passed pawn..and white with a weak pawn on h6..and soon black rooks willc ome in play..dont really see anythin else..am i missin sumthin??
Aug-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  James Demery: I don`t see much similarity to Botvinnik or Fischer in Kasparov`s play ughaibu. Then again my rating is about 1500 pts below Kasparov at his peak. Since you posted this over 4 years ago I wouldn`t blame you if you didn`t respond until 2011.
Dec-06-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  InspiredByMorphy: Only Petrosian would play a move like 17. ...e5 against Kasparov and pull it off. Petrosian's defensive play is amazing. Hes defensive most the game and then attacks!
Dec-06-07  RookFile: Another interesting feature of this game is that Kasparov was really playing Petrosian's own system against him. In the 80's, Kasparov would become the great expert of this system with white.
Dec-06-07  micartouse: 17 ... e5 is one of those weird dangling pawn moves where a pawn attacks another pawn that isn't blocked. This allows 3 options: to support the pawn, exchange it, or push past it. All these options, but it's somehow unnerving. Petrosian would do this kind of stuff and get his favorite closed up positions.
May-08-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <Only Petrosian would play a move like 17. ...e5 against Kasparov and pull it off.> <17 ... e5 is one of those weird dangling pawn moves where a pawn attacks another pawn that isn't blocked. This allows 3 options: to support the pawn, exchange it, or push past it. All these options, but it's somehow unnerving.>

Kasparov spent 58 minutes on his reply, btw.

May-29-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  James Demery: Interesting they were playing the Kasparov - Petrosian variation , but the Petrosian attack won in the end.
May-29-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  JointheArmy: <James Demery> I'm assuming it wasn't called the Kasparov-Petrosian variation before this game was played.
Nov-25-09  muwatalli: wow after a search of kasparov vs petrosian i find that petrosian and kasparov were tied 2-2 with 1 draw, but kasparov had white every game!
Dec-06-10  Maatalkko: The other Petrosian win is more spectacular, but this performance is way more dominant. Petrosian had this on lockdown. He was completely ready to prove that Bxg5 was nothing. I also really like how Petrosian's pawn chains coordinate perfectly with his bishops.
Dec-07-10  percyblakeney: <this performance is way more dominant. Petrosian had this on lockdown. He was completely ready to prove that Bxg5 was nothing>

Maybe that is annotating by result a bit, after all Kasparov was winning after 35. f6. Mistakes happen in time trouble but hardly a dominant performance by Petrosian...

Dec-13-10  Maatalkko: Ah, whoops, should have read the top post. I wasn't impressed by Bxg5 and I just assumed that Kasparov played the most challenging follow up.
Mar-11-12  Everett:    <lostemperor: As Kasparov said 35f6! wins. Showtime 35..Qf7 36.Qxe5 Re8 (36...Qg6 37.Rxb6! Qxh6 Qe7+!!) 37.Qg5 Qg6 38Rf5! to show some variations>

Has anyone with a strong program tested out 35.f6? I sense that there are better moves than the ones suggested after <35..Qf7 36.Qxe5> namely <36..Be8> or <36..Ra7>, both of which make sense by bringing defenders to the vulnerable king.

Even the main-line given above does not seem like a clear win. Hope the answer is not so obvious....

Mar-11-12  Capabal: 33.Bxg5 is a a great idea to win a pawn because clearly the bishop cannot be captured, but it looks like Kasparov didn't know why this was so when he played it, so after all it was a bluff, and Petrosian got away with calling the bluff and taking the bishop. Neither of them saw 35.f6. Once Petrosian just took the bishop, Kasparov must have felt embarrased or angry, which may explain his bad play in the next few moves. Because after missing the win 35.f6, he could have still kept things okay or even slightly better for white with 36.Qh8+. Things got downhill from there. By the time he played that horrific 40.Rxa4 his head must have been a mess.
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Petrosian vs the World Champions Decisive Games
by visayanbraindoctor
21.5 29....bd7! 30 h5!
from Techniques of Positional Play Part 2 by Takchessbooks
21.5 29....bd7! 30 h5!
from Techniques of Positional Play Part 2 by isfsam
only bronx cheers for this blunder
from cheers to a champ-kasparov by kevin86
Game 109
from Python Strategy (Petrosian) by Qindarka
Albertan's favorite games
by Albertan
052
from Garry KASPAROV on Garry KASPAROV I 1973-1985 by beta
Kasparov vs World Champions Decisive Games
by visayanbraindoctor
21.5 29....bd7! 30 h5!
from Techniques of Positional Play Part 2 by takchess
Game 52
from Part 1: 1973-1985 (Kasparov) by Incremental
p10 QGA
from How to Defend in Chess by Colin Crouch game coll by tak gambit
Tigran Petrosian
by blues66
Game 45
from On My Great Predecessors 3 (Kasparov) by isfsam
Jausch46's favorite games
by Jausch46
Petrosian fends off young Kasparov's attack after it errs
from Petrosian favourite games by CaradhrasAiguo
QID Kasparov-Petrosian Variation. Petrosian Attack (E12) 0-1
from Qside Fianchettos; Zukertort, QID & Tartakower by fredthebear
Biggest Heritor of Nimzo
by Gottschalk
QID Kasparov-Petrosian Variation. Petrosian Attack (E12) 0-1
from Petrosian Games Only by fredthebear
4...Bb7 5.Nc3 d5 6.cxd5 Nxd5 7.e3
from Queen's Indian Defence, Petrosian Variation by Zugged
Great Defense!!!
from tucak's favorite games by tucak
plus 28 more collections (not shown)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC