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Peter Leko vs Vladimir Kramnik
"Kramberry Sauce" (game of the day Nov-22-07)
Kramnik - Leko World Championship Match (2004)  ·  Russian Game: Classical Attack. Jaenisch Variation (C42)  ·  0-1
To move:
Last move:

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Given 30 times; par: 121 [what's this?]

Annotations by Raymond Keene.      [406 more games annotated by Keene]

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sac: 22...Qxe1+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 49 OF 49 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-22-07  xrt999: "the`ory"(n): the current habitual move order of modern masters.

Nov-22-07  JG27Pyth: I really enjoyed Keene's comments. Very instructive, and working within the rather constrained playing field of chess commentary, he has a nice straightforward style. Thanks RK.
Nov-22-07  D4n: A well played game.
Nov-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: Kramnik is clever. I wish I could handle endgames that way.
Nov-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Why can't White just draw with 50.Qe5+?
Black can't avoid the checks after this move that I can see.
Nov-22-07  zanshin: <ajile: Why can't White just draw with 50.Qe5+?>


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Analysis by Fritz 10 (21-ply):

1. (-2.42): 50...Rf6 51.Kh3 Raf4 52.Qa1 Rxf3+ 53.Kg2 R3f4 54.Kh3 Kg8 55.Qa8+ Kh7 56.Qb7 Kg7 57.Qc7 Re6 58.Qc3+ Kh7 59.Qd3+ Kg8 60.Qd8+ Kg7

Nov-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: You are right. I was hallucinating that Black couldn't block the check.
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: This was a really fine game-not a turkey. Funny how black played to capture the lone wolf f-pawn. The final win,of course,would be to capture the now-low man on the totem pole: the g-pawn.
Feb-14-08  aazqua: This may be my favorite game. Really nice work by Kramnik to convert a material imbalance into a meticulous win. This is pure thoughtful chess without the tactical nonsense that is often mistaken for greatness.
Oct-24-10  ethan stech: Having a history as a tactical player, I've dismissed the Kramnik-Leko match as boring until now. I didn't realize how interesting positional play really is.
Nov-13-10  Tigranny: Nice game by Kramnik.
Apr-13-11  PSC: Annotated this game here: http://patzerseescheck.blogspot.com...
May-27-11  Blunderdome: So, on move 62 (for example) is it not necessary to write 62...R1f2+ because the other rook is pinned? I didn't know that about algebraic.
May-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Blunderdome: So, on move 62 (for example) is it not necessary to write 62...R1f2+ because the other rook is pinned? I didn't know that about algebraic.>


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That's an interesting question, and probably one to ask <chessgames.com>.

I used to such see non-distinguished moves more often in the olden days when people had to record games by hand and it was easier to record as little informaiton as logically needed. Personally, I always preferred to include the extra information simply to avoid confusion, but in a strictly logical sense it is not needed.

These days, when computers generally do the physical labor of recording the games, supplying the extra information seems to be the general rule. I suspect it's easier to program a computer to simply record <62...R1f2+> rather than have it go through the extra steps of figuring out that <62...R6f2+> is illegal, so logically <62...Rf2+> is all that needs to be recorded.

If you look at the PGN for the game (click "VIEW" under the chessboard), you'll see that it gives <62...R1f2+>. For some reason, chessgames.com prefers to remove the "unnecessary" <1> from the notation.

You might try loading the game on your own computer, and seeing how it records the move. Mine gives <62...R1f2+>.

May-27-11  Blunderdome: You're right, Fritz 11 thinks the move is 62. R1f2+
May-27-11  DanielBryant: At least, personally, when I'm keeping score in a tournament game, out of habit I don't include the extra information if a pin would prevent it, but that's purely how my mind works.
May-27-11  Bob726: Where do Leko go wrong here? Surely he shouldn't have lost the position on move 23. It seemed he already had a pretty bad position before he sac'd the exchange, so where do he go wrong before that?
May-28-11  Helloween: <Bob726>White went wrong with preparation more than anything in this game. Kramnik's 17...Na5 novelty really shook things up, although after 44.hxg6 I believe White still has a draw.

A: not having a surprise ready against Kramnik should he play the Russian Defense, and B: missing 44.hxg6, which allowed Black to play g6-g5 and win.

Sep-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: ▼ White resigns. The pawn endgame is a trivial win, e.g. 66 Ke4 Ke6 67 Kd4 f5 68 gxf5+ Kxf5 69 Ke3 g4 70 Kf2 Kg5 71 Kg3 Kxh5 72 Kg2 Kg5 73 Kg3 h5 and the black pawns march down to promote. A marvellously dramatic encounter and a fine riposte to critics who thought the match would be dull. In the press conference after the game, Kramnik looked drained, Leko cheerful and phlegmatic. Kramnik insisted throughout that the position objectively is drawn, and pulled many sceptical faces when describing his win. The following day, both players remarked how hard it is to move on from such a battle, Kramnik musing "I tried to get the two rooks out of my mind, and to stop trying to coordinate them in different attacking patterns. I think it was four o'clock in the morning when I was able to sleep." Leko added, "I needed until five a.m. to get rid of those two black rooks."
Sep-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Game Collection: TRAPPED PIECES! TRAPPED PIECES! TRAPPED PIECES!
Dec-16-11  Penguincw: Endgame Statistics (move 43-59)

KQPPP vs. KRRPPP

The superior side (black) wins 34.4% of the time. This game is an example of that.

A draw occurs 52.6% of the time.

The inferior side (white) gets lucky 12.9% of the time.

Dec-29-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  cocker: Ending after 43 ... R4a5 is discussed in Nunn's book, UCE, p 207. Naturally his comments agree with Keene's annotations. With regard to previous comment, Nunn gives two examples where the queen wins and two where she loses.
Jul-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Leko vs Kramnik, 2004

<45. Qf6 h6

This is a very clever move from Kramnik, clearly overlooked by Leko, whose last move could have no other purpose than to threaten h6. <<<If now 46Qxh6, then ...R8a6 traps the white queen. >>>>

Game Collection: TRAPPED PIECES! TRAPPED PIECES! TRAPPED PIECES!

Jul-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Leko vs Kramnik, 2004

Game Collection: TRAPPED PIECE: ON THE EDGE OF THE BOARD If now 46Qxh6, then ...R8a6 traps the white queen.

Jul-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Leko vs Kramnik, 2004

45 Qf4-f6


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45 ... h7-h6!


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<45. Qf6 h6

This is a very clever move from Kramnik, clearly overlooked by Leko, whose last move could have no other purpose than to threaten h6. <<<If now 46Qxh6, then ...R8a6 traps the white queen.>>>>

(VARIATION)
45 Qf6xh6?? Ra8-a6! <trapped piece: h6-queen>


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