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Hikaru Nakamura vs Viswanathan Anand
Tata Steel (2011)  ·  Nimzo-Indian Defense: Three Knights Variation (E21)  ·  1/2-1/2
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-25-11  Strongest Force: Driver's seat? And where is he going? Hoboken?
Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: After the exchange of pawns it's a tablebase/theoretical draw.
Jan-25-11  AdrianP: So Kramnik joins the leaders.
Jan-25-11  Open Defence: lets hear it for Jersey right here!
Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Second time that Nakamura draws an inferior endgame against Anand, but this time (compared with the recent Anand vs Nakamura, 2010) it was easier.
Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: If Anand had either taken the exchange by 22...Nd3+ or else played 20...Ba6 instead of 20...cxd5 he might have won. A reasonable guess is that Anand overlooked something, and saw it too late.
Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: Back in the critical position on move 20, maybe 20...Rh7 to defend c7 would give Black winning chances. He then threatens to proceed much as in the game without fear of a Naka counterstrike.

It'll be interesting to hear what they say about that point.

Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: Instead of 22..Rae8, on 22...Nd3+ 23 Kd2 Nxc1 24 Rxc1 Rh7 White seems to have little or no compensation for the exchange. It is worse still if he can't get his QB into play.
Jan-25-11  patzer2: Well played game by both sides! Nakamura is showing a lot of maturity and good judgment in his play against super GMs like Anand. I'm sure there are some improvements to be found, but on the surface there are no glaring mistakes by either side.

A well played draw between the tournament leaders is a good result.

Jan-25-11  DEEPERGRAY: i concur umbrus
Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Deffi> - < lets hear it for Jersey right here!> The Channel Islands? Sark is nice, this time of year.

Funny how *that* Jersey gets to play in olympiads.

Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: <patzer2: Well played game by both sides! Nakamura is showing a lot of maturity and good judgment in his play against super GMs like Anand. I'm sure there are some improvements to be found, but on the surface there are no glaring mistakes by either side. A well played draw between the tournament leaders is a good result. > I think that you missed what happened between moves 20 and moves 22. Anand will definitely not be very pleased to have let a win slip.
Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: <chessgames.com? Are you going to switch to another game?
Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Instead of 22..Rae8, on 22...Nd3+ 23 Kd2 Nxc1 24 Rxc1 Rh7 White seems to have little or no compensation for the exchange.>

Of course White plays 23.Rxd3 rather than Kd2 and then takes on c7, with Black having to switch to defence due to the threat to the d6-pawn. It might have been considered, but White certainly has plenty of compensation.

Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <chessgames.com> Thanks for the live broadcast. =)

As was pointed out during the game, 22 ... Nd3+ 23. Rxd3 Bxd3 24. Rxc7 gives White a Pawn and very active play for the exchange. 23. Kd2?! instead is senseless.

I won't believe any "Black missed a win" commentary until Anand says so.

Jan-25-11  BobCrisp: My verdict on the game: superior woodshifting.
Jan-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Kinghunt: < Eyal: <Instead of 22..Rae8, on 22...Nd3+ 23 Kd2 Nxc1 24 Rxc1 Rh7 White seems to have little or no compensation for the exchange.>

Of course White plays 23.Rxd3 rather than Kd2 and then takes on c7, with Black having to switch to defence due to the threat to the d6-pawn. It might have been considered, but White certainly has plenty of compensation.>

Exactly. Shipov said he didn't like that idea, despite it winning the exchange, because it ties black down completely to defense. He suggested 22...Rh7!?

Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: On 22...Nd3+ 23 Rxd3 Bxd3 24 Rxc7 Rhd8 25 Nd4 Be4 26 Ne6 Rdc8 offers White the d6 pawn in exchange for the d5 pawn. An alternative is 22..Rh7. It will be interesting to see what Anand has to say.
Jan-25-11  rapidcitychess: Is chessgames.com switching to another game?
Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: <chessgames.com> Perhaps you can switch to the first game to gain five votes.
Jan-25-11  Ulhumbrus: I am off for now. Interesting games, such as that of Kramnik, seem to have ended.
Jan-25-11  polarmis: Final version of Sergey Shipov's commentary on this game:

http://www.chessintranslation.com/2...

Jan-25-11  SufferingBruin: Whatever they're paying Shipov, it's not enough.
Jan-25-11  VaselineTopLove: Gee I expected Nakamura to test Anand psychologically by starting with 1.e4 to see if he'd respond with the Sicilian or avoid it fearing sharp play against Nakamura. Even last year Nakamura could have played the Sicilian but responded with 1...e5

It seems Naka's the one afraid of sharp play against Anand.

Jan-26-11  Jay60: I agree with Ulhumbrus. Anand's moves 20 to 22 didn't keep the pressure up. Moving the Bishop to a6 did not seem to add any new pressure on Nakamura while also at the same time offering Nakamura the counter-play of Rook to a3 threatening Anand's Bishop and "a" pawn.
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