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Genrikh Chepukaitis
  
Number of games in database: 84
Years covered: 1952 to 2004
Highest rating achieved in database: 2417

Overall record: +21 -41 =20 (37.8%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 2 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Queen's Pawn Game (24) 
    A45 D00 A40 A41 D02
With the Black pieces:
 Uncommon Opening (10) 
    A00
 Queen's Pawn Game (6) 
    A40 E10 A46
 Nimzo Indian (6) 
    E41 E32 E42
 Robatsch (5) 
    B06
 Modern Defense (4) 
    A42
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   S Yuferov vs G Chepukaitis, 1996 0-1
   G Chepukaitis vs S Klimov, 2004 1/2-1/2
   O Otkidach vs G Chepukaitis, 2003 0-1
   G Chepukaitis vs S Volkov, 2000 1/2-1/2
   V Yemelin vs G Chepukaitis, 2001 0-1
   G Chepukaitis vs Neverov, 2000 1/2-1/2
   G Chepukaitis vs Brodsky, 1996 1/2-1/2

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Chigorin mem op (1997)
   St. Petersburg Open (2003)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Genrikh Chepukaitis plays the Hippopotamus by Cooleyhigh


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GENRIKH CHEPUKAITIS
(born Sep-14-1935, died Sep-05-2004, 68 years old) Russia

[what is this?]

Genrikh Mikhailovich Chepukaitis was born in 1935 in Leningrad, USSR. In 1957 he was inducted into the Soviet Army, where he spent two years studying with Vladimir Andreevich Makogonov. In classical play he had some good results but never gained an international title; his highest FIDE rating was 2420. However, he was much stronger at blitz chess, becoming one of the strongest blitz players in the Soviet Union. He was Leningrad/St. Petersburg blitz champion in 1965, 1967, 1976, 1978, 1982 and 2002.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/...

Last updated: 2017-07-29 03:25:02

 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 84  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. G Chepukaitis vs Spassky 0-1351952URS-ch sfC31 King's Gambit Declined, Falkbeer Counter Gambit
2. K Klaman vs G Chepukaitis  1-0571967LeningradD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
3. G Chepukaitis vs A Reshko  1-0461967Leningrad SpartakiadE47 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 O-O 5.Bd3
4. G Chepukaitis vs Korchnoi 0-1461967LeningradA49 King's Indian, Fianchetto without c4
5. G Chepukaitis vs Tseitlin 0-1271967LeningradE71 King's Indian, Makagonov System (5.h3)
6. G Chepukaitis vs Y Nikolaevsky  0-1441967USSR ChampionshipA41 Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6)
7. Y Gusev vs G Chepukaitis  1-0391967USSR ChampionshipB07 Pirc
8. G Chepukaitis vs V Zhuravliov  0-1601967USSR ChampionshipA06 Reti Opening
9. G Chepukaitis vs Korchnoi  ½-½291969LeningradD94 Grunfeld
10. Y Rizhkov vs G Chepukaitis  1-0481971USSRE41 Nimzo-Indian
11. Tal vs G Chepukaitis  1-0501971LeningradA00 Uncommon Opening
12. Gleizerov vs G Chepukaitis  1-0481995St. Petersburg OpenE01 Catalan, Closed
13. G Chepukaitis vs B Vager  1-0451995St. Petersburg OpenA84 Dutch
14. S Yuferov vs G Chepukaitis 0-1351996Chigorin Memorial tournamentA00 Uncommon Opening
15. Timoshenko vs G Chepukaitis  0-1611996RUS-Cup1 Chigorin memE11 Bogo-Indian Defense
16. G Chepukaitis vs Brodsky  ½-½431996RUS-Cup1 Chigorin memA45 Queen's Pawn Game
17. Timoshenko vs G Chepukaitis  1-0391996Petrov MemorialC10 French
18. Savon vs G Chepukaitis  ½-½421997White Nights opE10 Queen's Pawn Game
19. G Chepukaitis vs Brodsky  1-0521997RUS-Cup01 Chigorin memA43 Old Benoni
20. G Chepukaitis vs Taimanov  0-1601998Petrov MemorialA45 Queen's Pawn Game
21. S Voitsekhovsky vs G Chepukaitis  1-0311999Geller MemorialA00 Uncommon Opening
22. Vaulin vs G Chepukaitis  1-0291999Geller Memorial (Cup Russia)A40 Queen's Pawn Game
23. G Chepukaitis vs A Poluljahov  0-1261999Geller Memorial (Cup Russia)A40 Queen's Pawn Game
24. Kharlov vs G Chepukaitis  1-0261999Novgorod opA00 Uncommon Opening
25. G Chepukaitis vs E Shaposhnikov 0-1362000St Petersburg-ch 73rdD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 84  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Chepukaitis wins | Chepukaitis loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-14-09  karik: <I don't get it, can someone explain??>

Sorry, we can't. You know, we obey those guidelines, chapter 1. "No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language."

Jun-06-09  returnoftheking: Apparently there is an opening system named after this man: Khalifman names e4 g6 d4 Bg7 Nc3 a6 f4 with a future b5, Nd7 and c5 the Ujtelky -Chepukaitis system.
Aug-23-09  returnoftheking: http://www.gmchess.com/gmschool/lec...

By changing the numbers from 1 to 4 in the url you can see 4 lectures of the late master Chepukaitis.

It seems to me that Sosonko copied quite a lot of it in NIC and his book "smart chip from St Petersburg"

Feb-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <karik> Doesn't it apply for the usage of the word <bishop> alone?

Could be an expanding problem for a chesssite...

Sep-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: Genrikh Chepukaitis was a 2200 player but a really good blitz player from the Soviet Union. He had a rivalry with Korchnoi. He won the St. Petersburg Blitz Championship 5 times and Korchnoi 7 times. He regularly beat Tal at Blitz; that's how good he was. One day, Tal invited Chepukaitis to his room for some blitz matches and Genrikh obliged. When he got there, he met an older man who told him Tal was out but he could warm him up until Tal got back. Chepukaitis thought this was Tal's uncle. Then the older man proceeded to wipe out Genrikh in one game after another. Turns out the older man was Rashid Nezhmitzinov.

(sorry guys, i forgot where i lifted this piece of trivia)

Sep-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: "I love knights, without knights chess would just be boring."

- Genrikh Chepukaitis

Sep-19-10  rapidcitychess: Today's quote is not exactly the best idea ever, unless you are Mischa Tal, but that is different.

I wish I could sac, sac, mate like Tal..

Sep-19-10  rapidcitychess: Quote of the Day
< You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly. >

-- Genrikh Chepukaitis

That being the quote.

Mar-26-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Quote of the Day:

< "You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly." >

Cool.I never knew that.Next time I'm playing chess,I'll tell my opponent to move their queen to a square where she'll be taken by a pawn (or knight or bishop or rook or king).

Jun-22-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <blacksburg: "The problem with the French is that they don't have a word for entrepreneur." - george w. bush>

We always knew George the Genius got by on Daddy and Grandpa's coattails.

An obvious case of education gone to waste.

<keypusher: The future Mrs. Keypusher, upon seeing a copy of George Botterill's <Open Gambits>: "Uh, is that a book of pick-up lines?">

ROFL

That's an excellent book-wish I could find my copy!

Aug-16-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <wordfunph>

<wordfunph: Genrikh Chepukaitis was a 2200 player but a really good blitz player from the Soviet Union. He had a rivalry with Korchnoi. He won the St. Petersburg Blitz Championship 5 times and Korchnoi 7 times. He regularly beat Tal at Blitz; that's how good he was. One day, Tal invited Chepukaitis to his room for some blitz matches and Genrikh obliged. When he got there, he met an older man who told him Tal was out but he could warm him up until Tal got back. Chepukaitis thought this was Tal's uncle. Then the older man proceeded to wipe out Genrikh in one game after another. Turns out the older man was Rashid Nezhmitzinov.>

This anecdote appears in Sosonko's "Smart Chip from St. Petersburg."

However, it also appears- with different details- in chess cafe here

http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skitt...

And yet another version, with a new set of details, here

http://lanternascacchi.wordpress.co...

The basic story remains stable, but <Chepukaitis> was a notorious story teller who tended not to repeat the same version of any anecdote about his life.

Jan-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Quote of the Day

< "You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly." >

Jan-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: Six times Leningrad/St.Petersburg blitz champion... Who else famous won this tournament? Did Korchnoi, for example? Blitz tournaments at the highest levels seem to be a lot more popular now at any time during the 20th century, so I wonder if someone like Korchnoi ever played in them.
Sep-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Quote of the Day

<You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly.>

-- Genrikh Chepukaitis

Yes, but how? ;)

Sep-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <whiteshark> As the poker great Amarillo Slim wrote long ago, give your opponent a chance to do something that isn't good for him. Another outstanding poker player who's a decent chess player (Robert Ciaffone) once wrote, 'If you want to let a man hang himself, leave some slack in the rope'.
Sep-18-12  rapidcitychess:
<You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly.>

--- Genrikh Chepukaitis

Somehow, I'm not surprised he wasn't the World Champion.

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: ♔ Quote of the Day ♔

< "You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly." >

-Genrikh Chepukaitis

So I guess he means set up traps and all. This quote seems like it's easier said than done.

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: One wonders whether this result is possible in the absence of the understanding.
Apr-25-15  zanzibar: I found a picture of him as a young man from <64 N31 Aug 6, 1970 p9>. Submitted to <CG>.
May-29-15  TheFocus: <You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly> - Genrikh Chepukaitis.
Jun-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <whiteshark: One wonders whether this result is possible in the absence of the understanding.>

Such things are easier to arrange with knowledge and understanding, come to one's opponent and oneself.

Jun-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Genrikh Chepukaitis>: in an adult male human, a very painful inflammation of the chepukas.
Jun-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: For ten points, how often does the phrase <You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly> appear on this page?
Jun-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Don't axe me. Ah caint count that high!
Oct-08-20  login:

The aformentioned "Smart chip" contains a few passages about his/others inner workings (as seen from a spectator's point), e.g.

'.. He had numerous acquaintances, chess and card players, blitz partners, drinking buddies, those who knew him simply as Chip, but he didn't have any close friends. In company he told his funny stories incessantly and for the better part of his life he had his favourite, well-worn records. Even as a young man he had had a tendency towards long monologues, and as the years passed he became even more verbose. An endless stream of words flowed out of him, and socialising with him wasn't easy; actually, he needed a listener more than he needed a conversation partner. There was chess in his flood of words, but mainly there was him, he himself, the untitled and unrecognized, who in fact was great and legendary. The reaction came later. His wife Tanya recalls that their home life was already suffering. He was immersed in his own world, in his thoughts, and he was often withdrawn and taciturn. With him - so unpretentious in his food and clothes - domestic life wasn't easy: he demanded constant attention, because he was genuinely focused only on himself. He read everything he could get his hands on, mainly contenting himself with light stuff - newspapers and glossy magazines, the flow of information that catches the eye but doesn't detain you, draining away without any consequences for the soul. But if he happened on them, he would also read history books, literary fiction and thrillers. He never owned any chess books himself, but after his wife moved to Petersburg he read her chess books with interest.

..

To a psychologist, this need for self-affirmation and for proving his own superiority would probably be clear evidence of compensation for non-recognition of his contributions as an individual, real or imagined. After all, central to the game is the hunger to surpass others, to become the winner and in that role to receive honours. ..'


from
'Smart Chip from St.Petersburg and other tales of a bygone chess era', Gennadi Sosonko, New In Chess Alkmaar, 2006

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