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Robert James Fischer vs Viktor Korchnoi
Curacao Candidates (1962), Willemstad CUW, rd 19, Jun-08
Sicilian Defense: Fischer-Sozin Attack. Main Line Sherbakov Variation (B89)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-26-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Heavens, Korchnoi just completely wiped out Bobby's pawns.
Dec-23-05  setebos: Korchnoi was ready for Fischer in this pet variation of Bobbys
Dec-23-05  Boomie: Through 22 moves, white is doing well enough. His small advantage disappears after 23. Ba7. Better was Nc7.

The blunder 31. g4 gives black the advantage. After 31. c7 Bf5 32. Rc1 g5 33. c8=Q+ Bxc8 34. Rxc8+ Kg7, the game is materially equal.

Dec-23-05  HannibalSchlecter: I didn't like 29. c5. To me 29 Ra2 looks better, keeping the outside passed pawns intact.
Jan-01-06  Boomie: <HannibalSchlecter> Love the handle!

29. c5 appears to be white's best chance for equality. Although Herr Fritz is almost as endgame stupid as I, here are some lines.

29. c5

(29. Ra2 Be4 30. Bc5 h5 31. b4

(31. Kf2 f6 32. b4 Kf7 33. Bd6 Ke6 (-0.71/15))

31...f6 32. Bd6 Kf7 33. b5 Ke6 34. Bb4 g5 35. Ra6+ Kf5 36. Rd6 Ra7 (-0.56/14))

29...Bxc2 30. c6 Rxb3 31. c7 Bf5 32. Rc1 h5 33. c8=Q+ Bxc8 34. Rxc8+ Kh7= (0.00/14)

Apr-30-06  bardolotrist: 31. g4 was an inexplicable blunder. In the commerative tournament book, Tinman says that correct is 31. c7, after which 31..Rc3? runs into 32. Bc5! But then Tinman goes onto say that Black parries with 32...Bf5. Can't White just mate after this with Ra8+ ? (This whole question is about an analysis line)
Apr-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: <bardolotrist> I believe you are incorrectly interpreting Timman's note. Timman meant that if White played the correct 31.c7, then Black is forced to play 31...Bf5.

After 31...Bf5, he then indicated that Konstantinopolsky assessed the endgame after 32.Rd1 f6 33.Rd8+ Kf7 34.c8(Q) Bxc8 35. Rxc8 as equal.

Nov-17-07  HOTDOG: after 30...Rxb3,Boleslavsky and Bisguier were analyzing the game for the spectators,and they were agree that after 31...Bf5 White would have been in trouble.The president of the Canadian Chess Federation suggested 31.g4,to avoid 31...Bf5,but Boleslavsky explained him that it was a losing move after 31...Rxg3.after that with great surprise Fischer played 31.g4!!!!!
Sep-06-08  myschkin: . . .

Photo:

http://sachovespravy.szm.sk/fiskort...

Dec-23-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: According to Mednis' "How to Beat Bobby Fischer", Fischer was following here analysis published by the Polish master Kostro in a Polish chess magazine in January 1958, presumably of the game J Kostro vs Doda, 1957. In that game Black gave up the b pawn with 17...Nf6, and in case of 17...Rb8 Kostro suggested in his notes 18.Ra6 Bc7(?) 19.Ncb5 with clear advantage to White (19.Nc6 Rb7 20.Na4 might be even stronger).

However, Korchnoi's 18...Nf6! turns out to be a significant improvement, since by (temporarily) giving up the pawn Black is able to take advantage of the misplacement of White's pieces and equalize. With the rook on b8, 19.Bxb6?? would lose to 19...Rxb6! 20.Rxb6 Bc5+; and later, in case of 23.h3 Nxf2 24.Kxf2 Bd7/f5 Black's strong bishop pair completely paralyzes any hopes White may have on the Q-side. So instead of following Kostro's analysis, it might have been better to try 18.Ne4 (with the threat 19.Nxd6 Nxd6 20.Nc6 winning a pawn), which keeps more pressure on Black's position; there's also the possibility of playing earlier 17.Bxb6 instead of Nxa7, as in A Hennings vs R Ortega, 1968.

It seems that in most of Fischer's (seven) losses in Curacao he had some problems with his opening preparation - either his own wasn't thorough enough, or he underestimated the thoroughness of his opponent's. In this game he followed uncritically published analysis (though that led only to Black equalizing - the losing mistake came later, when Fischer was apparently trying too hard to win); in his other loss to Korchnoi, where incidentally the critical losing move is also g4, he was blindsided by the Pirc; in his loss to Petrosian he tried a very dubious and anti-positional idea against the McCutcheon (8.Ba5), which was refuted immediately; and in his two losses to Geller he followed lines that he already played in the Interzonal a few months earlier, and in both cases Geller came up with some significant improvement.

Dec-23-08  missing kasparov: I know to beat fischer three letters I.R.S
Dec-23-08  RookFile: Did they ever get a dime from Fischer?
Dec-23-08  Riverbeast: <Eyal> Thanks for the great background and analysis on this game
Dec-23-09  M.D. Wilson: Korchnoi played well against Fischer in general. Korchnoi was certainly someone who wouldn't collapse at the sight of Fischer, he just did things his own way. In their nine or so games together, I think Korchnoi held an edge (just an impression of the general character of these encounters), although they broke even with three wins each. A match between these two would have been really interesting. Fischer once said of Korchnoi, "I don't know what to play against him!"
Jan-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <RookFile: Did they ever get a dime from Fischer?>

Bet they didn't.

Jan-03-14  Petrosianic: <although they broke even with three wins each>

Two wins each. You're counting Blitz games. If we count those, there's no telling how they scored, since most of those aren't in any database.

Mar-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Travis Bickle: In my 2 DVD 'Victor Korchnoi My Life For Chess', Victor makes the comment about Fischer, "we had an equal score but I always felt Fischer was better." He also went on to say, "I've had a good record against many WCC's."
Mar-23-15  Olavi: <Victor makes the comment about Fischer, "we had an equal score but I always felt Fischer was better.">

A remarkable comment, considering that in their eight serious games he clearly had the upper hand (losing one game in Curacao by blundering in a winning position, letting Fischer off the hook in Rovinj-Zagreb). But his opinion need not be based on their mutual games.

Mar-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Fischer vs Korchnoi, 1962 (kibitz #13)

Chrome reports that <myschkin> the site with the photo link contains malware.

Can a sys admin breakup the link (i.e. make it readable, but unlink it), and add a warning?

Jun-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Fischer had recently defeated Korchnoi in the Stockholm IZT in this game:

Fischer vs Korchnoi, 1962

When asked for his most interesting game of the Stockholm IZT, Korchnoi mentioned that loss to Fischer!

But at Curacao Korchnoi got his rematch opportunity and prevailed, 2.5 - 1.5. Here are their games for that year:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

Now they can have a "Rematch Made in Heaven", and I have submitted this for GOTD with that very pun.

Jun-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Obituary for Korchnoi, by Barden:

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2...

Dec-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: REQUEST ANALYSIS


click for larger view

White to move

1) +0.61 (30 ply) 18.Ncb5 h6 19.Bf2 Rb7 20.Nc6 Bc7 21.Ra8 Bd7 22.Ne7+ Kh7 23.Nxc7 Rxc7 24.c3 Rb7 25.Nd5 b5 26.Bc5 Rg8 27.Ne7 Rh8 28.Rxf7 Be6 29.Rf2 Bxb3 30.Re2 Rd7 31.h3 Bc4 32.Rxe5 Rd1+ 33.Kh2 Nf6 34.Rxh8+ Kxh8 35.Ng6+ Kh7 36.Nf8+ Kg8 37.Ne6

2) +0.45 (30 ply) 18.Ra6 Nc7 19.Rxb6 Rxb6 20.Bxb6 Rb8 21.Bxc7 Bxc7 22.Nc6 Rb7 23.Nd5 Kf8 24.Rd1 Bd7 25.Nxc7 Bxc6 26.Nd5 f6 27.Kf2 Kf7 28.Nc3 Ke7 29.Ra1 f5 30.Ra6 Kd6 31.g3 Kc5 32.h4 g6 33.Ke3 Rb4 34.Ra7 f4+ 35.gxf4 exf4+ 36.Kf2

3) +0.45 (30 ply) 18.Rfd1 Rb7 19.Nab5 Bb4 20.Ra4 Bxc3 21.bxc3 Nf6 22.c4 Nd7 23.Ra6 Rfb8 24.h3 f6 25.Rd2 h6 26.Bf2 Bf7 27.Nd6 Rc7 28.Ra1 Nf8 29.Nxf7 Kxf7 30.Rad1 b5 31.c5 Ne6 32.Rd7+ Kg6 33.Rxc7 Nxc7 34.Rd6

6.0 minute analysis by Stockfish 8 v270317

Dec-25-17  WorstPlayerEver: <whiteshark>

The 1) 18. Ncb5 looks drawish, in the line 2) 18. Ra6 (played by Fischer) 31. Nb1 looks strong.

Dec-25-17  WorstPlayerEver: 18. Ra6 Nc7 19. Rxb6 Rxb6 20. Bxb6 Rb8 21. Bxc7 Bxc7 22. Nc6 Rb7 23. Nd5 Kf8 24. Rd1 Bd7 25. Nxc7 Bxc6 26. Nd5 f6 27. Kf2 Kf7 28. Nc3 Ke7 29. Ra1 f5 30. Ra6 Kd6 31. Nb1


click for larger view

31... Kc5 32. g3 Be4 33. Na3 Bd5 34. Ra5+ Kc6 35. Ra4 Kd7 36. Nc4 Bxc4 37. Rxc4


click for larger view

I don't know if this Rook end is won for White, but the position seems promising IMHO.

Sep-13-18  NeverAgain: <whiteshark sez: <6.0 minute analysis by Stockfish 8 v270317>

Stockfish 290818 64 POPCNT (8GB hash, 5-men Syzygy):

1. ± (1.05): 18.Ra6 Nc7 19.Rxb6 Rxb6 20.Bxb6 Rb8 21.Bxc7 Bxc7 22.Nc6 Rb7 23.Rd1 Bd7 24.Nd5 Kf8 25.Nxc7 Bxc6 26.Na6 Rb5 27.Rd6 Be4 28.c4 Ra5

2. ± (1.02): 18.Ncb5 Rb7 19.Nc6 Bd5 20.Nxd6 Nxd6 21.Nxe5 Be4 22.Rf2 f6 23.Nc4 Nxc4 24.bxc4 Rc8 25.b3 b5 26.c5 Rd7 27.Re2 Ra8 28.Rxa8+ Bxa8

3. ± (0.81): 18.Nc6 Rc8 19.Na7 Bc5 20.Bxc5 Rxc5 21.Ra6 Rc7 22.Re1 Bf5 23.Nab5 Rb7 24.Re2 f6 25.Nd5 Rff7 26.Ra8 Rf8 27.Rd2 Rd7 28.c4 Be6

d=42/63 15202MN

@<WorstPlayerEver> Your final position is won for White (SF gives +2.xx at d=40+) but Black must have improvements earlier as both 18...Nf6 and 18...Nc7 are between ± and ⩲ .

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