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S Chaivichit 
Photograph copyright © 2006, courtesy of Rene Gralla.  
Suchart Chaivichit
Number of games in database: 13
Years covered: 1982 to 2003
Last FIDE rating: 2270
Overall record: +8 -4 =1 (65.4%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.

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E67 King's Indian, Fianchetto (2 games)
A45 Queen's Pawn Game (2 games)

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SUCHART CHAIVICHIT
(born Jul-08-1956) Thailand

[what is this?]
FIDE master Suchart Chaivichit is the most famous player of the game Makruk, the Thai form of chess which is played by millions in Thailand and Cambodia. Although he played Makruk first, he also excelled at chess and won a gold medal for his performance in the 1988 Chess Olympiad in Greece.

 page 1 of 1; 13 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. S Chaivichit vs Choong Yit Chuan  1-030 1982 25th Chess Olympiad Lucerne (Men)A15 English
2. S Chaivichit vs M C Lopez  1-034 1982 25th Chess Olympiad Lucerne (Men)E67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
3. R Rodriguez vs S Chaivichit  1-036 1982 Zone 10 ChE12 Queen's Indian
4. S Chaivichit vs F Briffel Sobrinho  1-033 1984 26th Chess Olympiad Thessaloniki (Men)D02 Queen's Pawn Game
5. S Mirza vs S Chaivichit  0-145 1984 26th Chess Olympiad Thessaloniki (Men)E73 King's Indian
6. Miles vs S Chaivichit 1-024 1984 Thessaloniki olm ;BIGA40 Queen's Pawn Game
7. S Chaivichit vs C Van Tilbury  ½-½62 1984 Thessaloniki ol (Men)E67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
8. F Takashima vs S Chaivichit  0-145 1988 28th Chess Olympiad Thessaloniki (Men)E71 King's Indian, Makagonov System (5.h3)
9. S Mirza vs S Chaivichit  1-043 1989 Asian Team Championship, Genting Highlands (MalE93 King's Indian, Petrosian System
10. H Ardiansyah vs S Chaivichit  1-036 1989 Asian Team Championship, Genting Highlands (MalE69 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Main line
11. S Zeidler vs S Chaivichit  0-131 1996 32nd Chess Olympiad Yerevan (Men)C01 French, Exchange
12. Yap Choow Tun vs S Chaivichit  0-146 2003 22nd Southeast Asian Games Hanoi & Ho Chi Minh CityA45 Queen's Pawn Game
13. S Chaivichit vs L Leong  1-070 2003 22nd Southeast Asian Games Hanoi & Ho Chi Minh CityA45 Queen's Pawn Game
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Chaivichit wins | Chaivichit loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: sawasdeekap khun Suchart!
Mar-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: Suchart Chaivichit - herewith a photo that depicts him at the board in his favourite club at Bangkok: http://shaolinchess.de/thailand/Web... - is not only one of Thailand's strongest players of International Chess, but he is also the leading master of "MAKRUK", that is to say: that regional variant of chess that is very popular in the Kingdom of Siam and in Cambodia (where MAKRUK is called "Ouk Chatrang").

Herewith some further information: http://www.anusha.com/makrook.htm

Since there are neither "Queens" nor "Bishops" in MAKRUK - the "Queen" of Makruk moves like the "Vizier" in Arab Chess SHATRANJ, the "Bishop" of MAKRUK moves like the "Silver General" in Japanese SHOGI - , the rhythm of MAKRUK is laid back.

Therefore MAKRUK is closer to Arab SHATRANJ than the modern version of chess that is governed by FIDE. Therefore one can state that Thailand's MAKRUK is that version of chess that is closer to the original version than modern International Chess.

Thailand's chess MAKRUK has preserved the spirit of SHATRANJ, therefore it is like an reenactment of chess history when people battle it out at the board of MAKRUK.

Herewith a feature that underlines the close relationship between Arab SHATRANJ and MAKRUK: http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skitt...

MAKRUK has a prominent supporter: Vladmir Kramnik has been briefed on MAKRUK, and the Former World Champion has concluded that "Makruk is more strategic than International Chess ... ". Kramnik assesses MAKRUK to be "an anticipated endgame of International Chess".

Therefore the performance by Master
Suchart Chaivichit - herewith one more photo that depicts him at his club at Bangkok: http://shaolinchess.de/thailand/Web... - is amazing: being both a Master of Makruk and a gifted player in International Chess.

Herewith a Thai-language TV-feature on Khun Suchart Chaivichit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbFe... !

Mar-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: Kramnik and MAKRUK: Herewith a feature on Kramnik's first encounter with MAKRUK, with the link as follows http://www.chessvariants.org/orient...
Mar-28-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: MAKRUK, the Thai version of chess - that is that version of chess that is closest to the original version of chess, the Arab Chess SHATRANJ with the ancient All-times-Champions like al-Adli (800 - 870 A.D.), please compare http://www.geocities.com/siliconval..., and as-Suli (880 - 946 A.D.), therefore MAKRUK is THE MOST AUTHENTIC VERSION of chess nowadays! - , that version of chess is by far more popular in Thailand than International Chess that is governed by FIDE.

Therefore International Chess is just a thing for the FARANG in Thailand - and for those (few) native Thai players who are dreaming of an international career. And therefore <Khun SUCHART CHAIVICHIT> is a phenomenon in Thailand - being both the leading player in MAKRUK and a competent player in International Chess as well.

Okay, the Bangkok Chess Club, herewith the website: http://bangkokchess.com , works hard for the ambitious goal to popularize International Chess in Thailand. But even the annual Bangkok Open - the next one will take place from April 13th to April 19th, 2012 at Bangkok - cannot camouflage the fact that this tournament is more or less (the usual exceptions notwithstanding) an event for FARANG-players without any effect on the parallel scene of players of MAKRUK. In fact most of the players of MAKRUK even do not pay any attention to the activities of the Bangkok Chess Club and to its tournaments of International Chess.

For those who would like to know more about the deep-rooted culture of MAKRUK in Thailand, herewith a German-language feature that has been published in two sequels by the Austrian magazine SPIELXPRESS: http://www.spielxpress.com/download... and http://www.spielxpress.com/download...

I think that the players of MAKRUK - who do not care about International Chess and the uphill battle of the activists at the Bangkok Chess Club to establish International Chess in Thailand - have a point: Since players of MAKRUK play that version of chess that is CLOSEST TO THE ORIGINAL VERSION of chess, namely closest to Arab SHATRANJ, so why should they switch to a version of chess that is just a modernized variant of chess ... namely International Chess that exists for only 500 years whereas SHATRANJ has existed for more than 800 years?!

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