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TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
Karlsbad Tournament

Richard Teichmann18/25(+13 -2 =10)[games]
Akiba Rubinstein17/25(+12 -3 =10)[games]
Carl Schlechter17/25(+13 -4 =8)[games]
Georg Rotlewi16/25(+15 -8 =2)[games]
Frank James Marshall15.5/25(+10 -4 =11)[games]
Aron Nimzowitsch15.5/25(+11 -5 =9)[games]
Milan Vidmar15/25(+10 -5 =10)[games]
Paul Saladin Leonhardt13.5/25(+10 -8 =7)[games]
Savielly Tartakower13.5/25(+9 -7 =9)[games]
Oldrich Duras13.5/25(+10 -8 =7)[games]
Alexander Alekhine13.5/25(+11 -9 =5)[games]
Rudolf Spielmann13/25(+8 -7 =10)[games]
Julius Perlis12/25(+7 -8 =10)[games]
Erich Cohn11.5/25(+8 -10 =7)[games]
Grigory Levenfish11.5/25(+8 -10 =7)[games]
Hugo Suechting11.5/25(+7 -9 =9)[games]
Amos Burn11/25(+8 -11 =6)[games]
Georg Salwe11/25(+6 -9 =10)[games]
Paul F Johner10.5/25(+8 -12 =5)[games]
Abram Isaakovich Rabinovich10.5/25(+5 -9 =11)[games]
Borislav Kostic10.5/25(+5 -9 =11)[games]
Fyodor Ivanovich Dus Chotimirsky10/25(+9 -14 =2)[games]
Semion Alapin8.5/25(+4 -12 =9)[games]
Oscar Chajes8.5/25(+7 -15 =3)[games]
Hans Fahrni8.5/25(+7 -15 =3)[games]
Charles Jaffe8.5/25(+8 -16 =1)[games]
*

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Karlsbad (1911)

The second (1) international chess master tournament (Karlsbad (1907) preceeded it and Karlsbad (1923) was the 3rd in this series) held in the health resort of Karlsbad (located in present day Czech Republic) was conducted from August 20th to September 24th, 1911. The opening ceremony was held in the Kurhaus. Twenty-six chess masters were invited to particpate in the enormous round robin tournament. Among the players were established masters such as Akiba Rubinstein, Carl Schlechter, and Frank James Marshall, as well as younger stars such as Alexander Alekhine, Aron Nimzowitsch, and George Rotlewi. As the tournament went on and the grueling schedule of games took its toll on the players, the expected names emerged as leaders with one noticeable addition: Richard Teichmann! From Teichmann's return to international play in 1902 (after having lost the use of his right eye to an infection) to 1910 he had drawn many games due to poor health, which earned him so many 5th place prizes that he was known as "Richard the Fifth." In 1911, however, Teichmann received a small inheritance from his mother that provided him more leisure time to focus during ongoing tournaments without having to work at the same time. This tournament proved to be Teichmann's greatest international achievement. He earned clear first against the massive field, including victories against shared seconds Rubinstein and Schlechter and fourth place Rotlewi.

The final standings and crosstable:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pts 1 Teichmann * 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 18 =2 Rubinstein 0 * ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 17 =2 Schlechter 0 ½ * 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 17 4 Rotlewi 0 ½ 1 * 1 1 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 16 =5 Marshall ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 1 1 1 15½ =5 Nimzowitsch 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 15½ 7 Vidmar ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ * 0 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 15 =8 Leonhardt ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 13½ =8 Tartakower 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ * 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 13½ =8 Duras 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 * 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 13½ =8 Alekhine 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 13½ 12 Spielmann 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 * 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 0 13 13 Perlis ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 * ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 1 12 =14 Cohn ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 0 11½ =14 Levenfish ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 ½ * 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 1 0 11½ =14 Süchting 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 11½ =17 Burn 1 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 * 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 0 11 =17 Salwe ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 0 1 * 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 11 =19 Johner ½ 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ 1 0 1 1 0 0 10½ =19 Rabinovich ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 10½ =19 Kostic 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 0 1 10½ 22 Dus Chotimirsky 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 ½ * 1 0 0 1 10 =23 Alapin ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ 0 8½ =23 Chajes 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ * 0 1 8½ =23 Fahrni 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 * 0 8½ =23 Jaffe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 * 8½

(1) Wikipedia article: Carlsbad 1911 chess tournament.

Original collection:Game Collection: Karlsbad 1911, by User: suenteus po 147.

 page 1 of 13; games 1-25 of 325  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Alekhine vs Vidmar 1-0381911KarlsbadC49 Four Knights
2. Spielmann vs Alapin 0-1531911KarlsbadC14 French, Classical
3. Rotlewi vs Rubinstein ½-½431911KarlsbadD33 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
4. A Rabinovich vs E Cohn 0-1501911KarlsbadC36 King's Gambit Accepted, Abbazia Defense
5. J Perlis vs Burn 1-0351911KarlsbadC25 Vienna
6. Levenfish vs Salwe  ½-½521911KarlsbadC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
7. B Kostic vs Marshall  ½-½311911KarlsbadD34 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
8. P F Johner vs Teichmann  ½-½481911KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
9. C Jaffe vs H Suechting 0-1481911KarlsbadD02 Queen's Pawn Game
10. Fahrni vs Nimzowitsch 0-1431911KarlsbadB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
11. Dus Chotimirsky vs Tartakower 1-0461911KarlsbadD08 Queen's Gambit Declined, Albin Counter Gambit
12. Duras vs Leonhardt 1-0701911KarlsbadC77 Ruy Lopez
13. O Chajes vs Schlechter  0-1621911KarlsbadD15 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
14. Schlechter vs J Perlis 1-0451911KarlsbadD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
15. H Suechting vs O Chajes 1-0411911KarlsbadB73 Sicilian, Dragon, Classical
16. Tartakower vs B Kostic 1-0631911KarlsbadA00 Uncommon Opening
17. Teichmann vs Leonhardt ½-½641911KarlsbadC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
18. Vidmar vs Fahrni 1-0431911KarlsbadD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
19. Salwe vs C Jaffe  ½-½471911KarlsbadD04 Queen's Pawn Game
20. Rubinstein vs Duras 1-0521911KarlsbadA22 English
21. Nimzowitsch vs A Rabinovich 1-0461911KarlsbadC46 Three Knights
22. Marshall vs Alekhine ½-½451911KarlsbadA40 Queen's Pawn Game
23. P F Johner vs Spielmann 0-1281911KarlsbadA84 Dutch
24. E Cohn vs Rotlewi  1-0531911KarlsbadC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
25. Burn vs Dus Chotimirsky  1-0431911KarlsbadC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
 page 1 of 13; games 1-25 of 325  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-30-17  zanzibar: Earlier there was mention of some comments from Nunn comparing players from this tournament. One poster lamented stale links, so I did a quick search, and offer this link as a potential substitute:

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/ch...

Nunn is always worth reading, imo.

.

May-30-17  zanzibar: And this might have been the original link:

https://web.archive.org/web/2008070...

.

Jul-11-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <zanzibar: And this might have been the original link: >

Wow, thanks!

<zanzibar: <offramp> is a very capable, and flexible, fellow.>

You too.

Jul-21-17  sudoplatov: Amusingly, Teichmann was ranked fifth in the world in 1911 by Edo.
Jul-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <sudoplatov: Amusingly, Teichmann was ranked fifth in the world in 1911 by Edo.>

Lovely, as well as appropriate, given his tendencies.

Jul-21-17  Howard: Who was Edo?

If you mean Elo, his rating system wasn't exactly around back then.

Or are you referring to Chessmetrics?

Jul-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: There is a site called edochess.com, or some such; another on the lines of Sonas' Chessmetrics.
Sep-20-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <offramp: I WOULD ALSO like to ask some of the stronger players here a question.> <Without false modesty, and having looked through Hugo Süchting's games from this tournament, how do you think you would have done?>

Seriously. I reckon that <FSR, <Perfidious> and a few others, would have easily achieved the halfway mark.

Would anyone like to give an estimation of his or her own score as compared to Süchting's?>

This is a very good question. It would be a lot of work to answer, but I’d love to hear what <perfidious> or <FSR> or others had to say.

Sep-20-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Me?

I would have finished minus in this event, unless having the tournament of my life.

Sep-21-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: My self-assessment would be similar to that of <perfidious>. If I did not finish outright last, I would count it a success. Most likely I would finish outright last - I hope by not too large a margin. It is easy to criticize others' play, but everyone in this tournament was a strong player, stronger than I am.
Sep-21-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Alekhine finished +2. Spielmann finished +1. To state the obvious, these are extremely strong players, among the top players in the world. http://www.chessmetrics.com/cm/CM2/... I am flattered that <offramp> thinks I would have done so well as they did. But I greatly doubt it.
Sep-21-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Maybe I would have had more draws than Jaffe racked up at Karlsbad. (laughs)
Sep-21-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: >FSR: Alekhine finished +2....>

Alekhine was only 18/19. The other players are definitely famous, but you have to look at their actual games, not their reputations.

Sep-21-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <offramp> By Chessmetrics' reckoning (see link I previously gave), he was already No. 17 in the world. I realize that didn't mean as much as it does today, but I'm not nearly conceited enough to think I play better today than Alekhine did then.
Sep-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <FSR: <offramp> By Chessmetrics' reckoning (see link I previously gave), he was already No. 17 in the world. I realize that didn't mean as much as it does today, but I'm not nearly conceited enough to think I play better today than Alekhine did then.>

What I'd be curious to see you or <Perfidious> do -- and it would be an immense amount of work, so I'd probably say hell no if I were you -- is go through Suechting's games, all of them, and try to figure out how you stack up against him. Because he finished at -2, and Nunn at least seems to think he was probably not as good as you or Alan.

Sep-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <keypusher....Because (Suechting) finished at -2, and Nunn at least seems to think he was probably not as good as you or Alan.>

While I have great respect for Nunn's abilities on the 64 squares and with pen in hand, I believe he is well off the mark on this: I cannot, as stated above, imagine making a plus score against this lineup unless playing at a consistently higher level than I ever did--and my very best TPRs were in the 2500-2550 USCF range, in weekend events. These attributions of 2100 or thereabouts for Suechting's strength seem unnaturally low.

Sep-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <keypusher> Spending a bunch of time to try to figure out how my play stacks up against that of someone I've barely heard of from over a century ago doesn't strike me as a very productive undertaking.
Sep-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Neither have I any desire to compare myself to another in such a way in what is surely an irresoluble argument; that is a cottage industry here at more rarefied levels, as is currently happening in the latest revitalisation of the <Efim Geller is one of the greatest players to never win the title> ruckus.
Sep-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: There are tens of thousands of current players who play chess better than I. As I've indicated, I greatly doubt that we could establish that my play is as good or better than that of Süchting. But even if we could, that wouldn't show that he was a fish. It would only prove that he didn't have access to ChessBase, Stockfish, Informants and such - which we already know.
Sep-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <FSR> It's definitely an unreasonable request. <As I've indicated, I greatly doubt that we could establish that my play is as good or better than that of Süchting. But even if we could, that wouldn't show that he was a fish. It would only prove that he didn't have access to ChessBase, Stockfish, Informants and such - which we already know.>

It's also an unfair comparison, as you point out. All "contests" between current and former players that don't seek to somehow equalize conditions are unfair. But I nevertheless find them interesting, not least because you're comparing two known quantities, as opposed to "equalized" comparisons, where we try to figure out how good Paul Morphy, say, would be with engines and databases, which is a hopeless task.

Sep-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi FSR,

Sorry interrupt.

I used that game you played where you just moved one pawn then play the rest of your game with Knights. (you should submit it) Although it broke a golden rule that I never use blitz games, this one fitted perfectly into what I do.

https://www.redhotpawn.com/chess-bl...

Thank You.

***

Sep-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  nizmo11: Regarding comments on Suechting's level of play. I got an idea to run a "blunder check" on the games of the tournament for collecting stats about the number of big mistakes made.
But now I see this has already been done:
Richard Forster writes in his Burn biography (p. 801): "[...] with the help of a computer all the games [of Karlsbad 1911] have been closely checked for errors by John Nunn in an attempt to make a fair comparison of past versus present masters."

The reference given is:
John Nunn's Chess Puzzle Book, (London 1999), pp 66-86, 175-84.

I, think the comment on Suechting comes from this book, but does it have any general statistics about the number of mistakes made?

Sep-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Glad you liked it, <Sally Simpson>. At your request, I have submitted it. I'll be surprised if they publish it. It's only a blitz game, and obviously White's play was execrable.
Sep-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi FSR,

Of course they will publish it. It's not only a blitz game, it is THE BLITZ GAME!

They have kept for posterity this 11 move blitz masterpiece Carlsen vs Caruana, 2014 so they are honour bound to publish your 11 mover.

***

Sep-26-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  nizmo11: I did blunder checking on Karlsbad games for some players using Stockfish and <python-chess> chess library together <chess-artist> both downloaded from Github. (the latter with slight modification of output for gathering stats.

Here "blunder" is defined as a move whose evaluation is 3.0 units lower than evaluation of the engine's top move. Errors in positions where evaluation drops but position still remains won were not counted. Also after checking the game, some moves flagged as blunders in complex positions were ignored. (The move was perhaps in-accurate, but did not really look like a blunder )

Evaluation time was short 2 seconds/move but this should be enough to discover clear errors.

Running the check on couple of players . I got the following results below. based on these results, the main observatios are :

Suechting's error rate (made/or received) was not exceptional, but there were a striking number of errors in Rotlewi's games.

Results:, for each player it was counted:
- the numbers of games where the player made at least one "blunder" during the game
-the same count for his opponent,
-the number of games were there were errors by either side

Teichmann 3 5 18
Rubinstein 8 9 14
Schlechter 4 6 17
G. Rotlewi 9 11 8
---
Erich Cohn 4 7 14
H Suechting 8 7 14
Amos Burn 5 5 17

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