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Lake Hopatcong 1926
Compiled by crawfb5
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Held at the Hotel Alamac in Lake Hopatcong, NJ, the same site as the 9th (and final) American Chess Congress in 1923 (Game Collection: Lake Hopatcong 1923 (9th American Chess Congress). Harry Latz, who owned the hotel with his mother, also helped organize New York 1924 (Game Collection: New York 1924), which was held at the New York City Alamac. Latz was also involved in an early attempt to arrange a WC match between Capablanca and Alekhine. The hotel group included the Atlantic City Alamac. The name was a combination of Latz' mother's and father's first names. A few photos of the players enjoying the resort activities may be seen here: http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/....

THE PLAYERS

Jose Raul Capablanca -- Capablanca had recently made a phenomenal run of 63 serious games without a loss (1916-1924, +40 -0 =23), which included his world championship match with Emanuel Lasker. Capablanca was just over a year away from losing the world championship to Alexander Alekhine, but Capablanca was in fine form, only having lost 6 serious games (+97 -6 =43) since being edged out by Marshall at Havana in 1913 (Game Collection: Havana 1913).

Abraham Kupchik -- the two Lake Hopatcong events, 1923, where he tied with Marshall for first, and 1926, where he finished second behind Capablanca, were two of Kupchik's best results. He also drew a match (+1 -1 =4) with Carlos Torre Repetto in New York, 1924. A brief summary of Kupchik's career along with a photo of him playing Capablanca at Lake Hopatcong is at: http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/....

Geza Maroczy -- Maroczy's peak results were between 1899-1908, where he placed no lower than third in only one of 15 tournaments, including Game Collection: London 1899, Game Collection: Paris 1900, Game Collection: Munich 1900, Game Collection: Monte Carlo 1902, Game Collection: Monte Carlo 1903, Game Collection: Monte Carlo 1904, Game Collection: Barmen Meisterturnier A, and Game Collection: Ostend 1905. Maroczy signed an agreement with Emanuel Lasker in 1906 for a world championship title match, with games to be played in Cuba, Vienna, and New York. Unfortunately for Maroczy revolution broke out in Cuba and the Viennese backers became dissatisfied only part of the match would be in Vienna, so the match fell through. Maroczy would never again get so close to the brass ring, as what would otherwise have been his shot at the title passed to Marshall the following year. In the early 1920s, Maroczy influenced another world championship by coaching Vera Menchik. Maroczy continued to play until 1947, but by the time of Lake Hopatcong, his major individual successes were behind him. He did, however, lead the Hungarian team in the Olympiads of 1927 (gold medal), 1930 (silver medal), and 1933 (http://www.olimpbase.org/players/k2...).

Frank James Marshall -- In the years since Havana 1913, Marshall had been active and had some good results, but finished behind Capablanca in all of the tournaments where they both played. Lake Hopatcong 1926 was not to be Marshall's finest hour.

Edward Lasker -- Although sometimes described as Emmanuel Lasker's "cousin," Edward's greatgrandfather's greatgrandfather was the common ancestor back in Kepno, now in Poland (Wikipedia article: Edward Lasker). Lasker narrowly lost a 1923 match to Marshall (+4 -5 =9) for the US championship in New York. Lasker was an engineer by trade and was known as much for his writing on chess and the game of go as for his play.

Capablanca XX =1 =1 == 11 6 Kupchik =0 XX 1= 1= =1 5 Maroczy =0 0= XX =1 11 4.5 Marshall == 0= =0 XX 10 3 Lasker 00 =0 00 01 XX 1.5

<ROUND 1> Capablanca starts off in fine form, winning against Lasker, but Marshall loses to Maroczy. Despite being the only player who will draw both of his games with Capablanca, this is the start of a poor tournament for Marshall.

ROUND 2 Kupchik loses to Capablanca and Marshall scores his first win against Lasker.

ROUND 3 Marshall and Kupchik draw and Maroczy beats Lasker (the New York Times article from 6/10/1926 says Lasker lost on time).

ROUND 4 Marshall draws with Capablanca and Kupchik wins against Maroczy. Marshall will probably need to win his second game against Capablanca as well as score efficiently against the rest of the field if he hopes to catch up with Capablanca, but he will achieve neither in this tournament.

ROUND 5 Kupchik and Capablanca win, and Maroczy falls further behind. At the halfway mark, Capablanca has only given up a single draw to Marshall, who has one loss and two draws. Kupchik is closer, with one loss and one draw.

ROUND 6 Ed. Lasker vs Capablanca, 1926 wins the brilliancy prize. Maroczy and Marshall draw.

ROUND 7 Capablanca draws his second game with Kupchik, his closest rival. With what amounts to a full point lead (Kupchik had his second BYE in Round 6 and Capablanca would have his second BYE in Round 8, so Kupchick could "pick up" a point on Capablanca with a win in Round 8), Capablanca could practically coast to the finish. Marshall continues his tailspin as Lasker scores his only win of the tournament against him.

ROUND 8 Maroczy wins his second game against Lasker and Marshall loses another, this time to Kupchick.

ROUND 9 Marshall draws his final game of the tournament with Capablanca, but it is too little too late. Kupchick can only draw with Maroczy, so Kupchik loses his last realistic chance to catch Capablanca.

ROUND 10 Capablanca was in the lead by a full point, so the draw with Maroczy was all he needed to finish clear first. Kupchik drew with Lasker, earning a clear second.

Round 1 -- 7 Jul 1926
Capablanca vs Ed. Lasker, 1926 
(D52) Queen's Gambit Declined, 30 moves, 1-0

Round 1 -- 7 Jul 1926
Marshall vs Maroczy, 1926 
(C11) French, 41 moves, 0-1

Round 2 -- 8 Jul 1926
Kupchik vs Capablanca, 1926 
(A46) Queen's Pawn Game, 39 moves, 0-1

Round 2 -- 8 Jul 1926
Ed. Lasker vs Marshall, 1926 
(C42) Petrov Defense, 27 moves, 0-1

Round 3 -- 9 Jul 1926
Marshall vs Kupchik, 1926
(A50) Queen's Pawn Game, 54 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 3 -- 9 Jul 1926
Maroczy vs Ed. Lasker, 1926
(D30) Queen's Gambit Declined, 40 moves, 1-0

Round 4 -- 10 Jul 1926
Kupchik vs Maroczy, 1926 
(D64) Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack, 48 moves, 1-0

Round 4 -- 10 Jul 1926
Capablanca vs Marshall, 1926
(A48) King's Indian, 43 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 5 -- 11 Jul 1926
Ed. Lasker vs Kupchik, 1926
(D85) Grunfeld, 54 moves, 0-1

Round 5 -- 11 Jul 1926
Maroczy vs Capablanca, 1926 
(B13) Caro-Kann, Exchange, 49 moves, 0-1

Round 6 -- 14 Jul 1926
Ed. Lasker vs Capablanca, 1926 
(A46) Queen's Pawn Game, 36 moves, 0-1

Round 6 -- 14 Jul 1926
Maroczy vs Marshall, 1926
(B02) Alekhine's Defense, 41 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 7 -- 15 Jul 1926
Capablanca vs Kupchik, 1926
(D30) Queen's Gambit Declined, 41 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 7 -- 15 Jul 1926
Marshall vs Ed. Lasker, 1926
(D43) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 33 moves, 0-1

Round 8 -- 16 Jul 1926
Kupchik vs Marshall, 1926
(A17) English, 35 moves, 1-0

Round 8 -- 16 Jul 1926
Ed. Lasker vs Maroczy, 1926
(D18) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch, 52 moves, 0-1

Round 9 -- 17 Jul 1926
Maroczy vs Kupchik, 1926
(C49) Four Knights, 47 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 9 -- 17 Jul 1926
Marshall vs Capablanca, 1926 
(C21) Center Game, 17 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 10 -- 20 Jul 1926
Kupchik vs Ed. Lasker, 1926 
(A09) Reti Opening, 59 moves, 1/2-1/2

Round 10 -- 20 Jul 1926
Capablanca vs Maroczy, 1926 
(C01) French, Exchange, 21 moves, 1/2-1/2

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