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Alonzo Morphy
  
Number of games in database: 6
Years covered: 1848 to 1850
Overall record: +0 -6 =0 (0.0%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games.

Most played openings
C51 Evans Gambit (3 games)


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ALONZO MORPHY
(born Nov-23-1798, died Nov-22-1856, 57 years old) United States of America

[what is this?]

Alonzo Morphy was born in Charleston, South Carolina on November 23, 1798. He is best known as the father of the legendary Paul Morphy. Alonzo Morphy was a successful lawyer and served in the Louisiana state legislature. He was the Attorney General of Louisiana from 1828 to 1830, and a Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court from August 31, 1839 to March 19, 1846. He suffered a tragic and untimely demise after a cut above his eye from a Panama hat worn by a friend led to congestion of the brain. That led to his death on November 22, 1856 in New Orleans. The former Morphy family home is now the site of a prominent New Orleans restaurant, Brennan's.

Wikipedia article: Alonzo Morphy

Last updated: 2017-09-20 04:49:03

 page 1 of 1; 6 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Morphy vs A Morphy 1-0181848New OrleansC33 King's Gambit Accepted
2. Morphy vs A Morphy 1-0311848New OrleansC23 Bishop's Opening
3. Morphy vs A Morphy 1-0211849New Orleans -C51 Evans Gambit
4. Morphy vs A Morphy 1-0461849New OrleansC51 Evans Gambit
5. Morphy vs A Morphy 1-0151849New Orleans mC51 Evans Gambit
6. Morphy vs A Morphy 1-0181850New Orleans ?000 Chess variants
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Morphy wins | Morphy loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-16-04  iron maiden: Well, yes, you could look at it negatively and say that Alonzo has a 0% record, or you could look at the bright side:

1. Given the opposition, I could've done no better.

2. Alonzo never once lost a game as White, and never to anyone who didn't carry his own surname.

Mar-16-04  suenteus po 147: It's also not so bad if you consider that two of the games are duplicates with just slightly different half moves between them. Only four games against Paul is not enough practice.
Oct-16-04  Knight13: No wins recorded? That's sad.
Aug-18-05  Corwin: i guess losing to your son is not that bad.. at list it can get worse, like losing to your mother in law :)
Aug-18-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  BishopBerkeley: <Corwin> Or losing to your spouse...

From a book dated 1813, bearing the name of François André Philidor , from the chapter titled "Anecdotes":

"Ferdinand, Count of Flanders,

Having been accustomed to amuse himself at Chess with his wife, and being constantly beaten by her, a mutual hatred took place; which came to such an height, that when the count was taken prisoner at Bovines, she suffered him to remain a long time in prison, though she could easily have procured his release...."

Alas, poor Count! Condemned to sit there and Count the days...

You may view the anecdote, along with a nice biographical bit on Philidor at:

http://batgirl.atspace.com/ChessAne...

(: ♗ Bishop Berkeley ♗ :)

Aug-19-05  Corwin: BishopBerkeley:

women, ha? :)

probably she didn't love him that much to begin with..

funny. i'll remember not to play with my girlfriend. or she'll throw me to the cell too :)

Aug-21-05  WMD: According to The Even More Complete Chess Addict:

Alonzo Morphy, father of the legendary Paul, was killed by a Panama hat. A cut above the eye from a Panama hat worn by a friend led to congestion of the brain, causing Judge Morphy's untimely demise.

Nov-16-05  Chopin: His father was Judge Alonzo Morphy of the High Court of Louisiana- I'm sure he had better things to do in his life then study chess. In my opinion his father wasn't a bad player at all- perhaps 1800 ELO. To lose to your son, whose a chess genius, is no insult.

We all know the best way to improve your chess game is to play against better opponents, and Mr. Alonzo couldn't have asked for better competition. In my opinion, I don't think it would be easy to beat Morphy's father in a chess match; I'm sure he picked up a thing or two from his son.

From my own experience, my chess dexterity sky rocked because one my chess master friend ( 2400 Elo) gave me a chess beating for a few years. I have learnt more from playing against him, then any chess book.

Feb-24-06  McCool: Are these two related?
May-28-06  dakgootje: <McCool> father and son
May-28-06  NOKRO: I read from a book, that bothers Alonzo and Ernest, are always playing chess at the former's house, with the young Paul watching. Although past the sleeping time of the boy, Alonzo would'nt mind that Paul was watching the games. In one instance, the game was completed, Ernest said his goodbye. Paul said to his father, "You could have won father"!. Alonzo, who had high regards of his bothers chess playing abilities. told his son, just to cut short the conversation because it was past sleeping time, "Your uncle has a profound understanding of chess". However, little Paul Morphy persisted, to the point of telling his father that they replay the game. The father said, "Son, the pieces had been reaaranged, I could'nt remember the last position". Paul said, "I do", and arranged back the pieces with his quick little hand, to the amazement of Alonso. After a while, Alonzo said, "Yes, I do remember that position, that was in fact the position when I resigned the game". Paul showed him the winning line. After listening and watching his little boy explained to him his idea, Alonzo said, "you are right". That was the beginning of Paul Morphy's career as the Great Chess Player in history ever!.
May-28-06  NOKRO: Before Alonzo went to sleep that night, he whispered to his wife, "We have a new chess player in the family". I guess during that time, being able to play chess is a distinction.
May-28-06  dakgootje: Think in those times you must've VERY good to make a living out of chess (or very rich)
Jan-02-09  YJGYJ: I love that Paul Morphy's father Alonzo is in the database as the loser, since he taught the winner everything he ever knew about chess and those games that didn't make this list are the precursors to greatness.
Sep-07-09  UnicornChessman: Is literally *everyone* too dull to notice that Alonzo is Morphy's UNCLE, not FATHER???!!! It says so in his one-sentence-long description of himself on this very profile! Uncle, people. Not father... That's cool though, cause it doesn't too much matter... Farewell!!!
Oct-07-09  Jason Frost: <UnicornChessman> Perhaps after reading everyone calling Alonzo his father you would consider the possibility that the chessgames.com bio is wrong.

Every bio of Morphy I have seen states that Alonzo was the father, including the bio on Morphy's page of <CG>

"Paul Charles Morphy was born on June 22, 1837 in New Orleans. He was the son of a successful lawyer and judge Alonzo Morphy. His uncle, Ernest Morphy....."

Mar-29-10  Wrong: <jason frost> so after all, the bio is wrong.
Jun-21-10  BobCrisp: <He is the father of Paul Morphy.>

He was...

Nov-18-12  Llawdogg: A Panama hat?
Nov-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: R.I.P. Alonzo Morphy. Too bad he died before he could see his son start dominating Europe in 1857 and 1858.
Nov-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Happy birthday, Alonzo Morphy.
Mar-31-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Alonzo Morphy, father of the legendary Paul, was killed by a Panama hat.>

For those who don't believe hats can be fatal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXZ...

Mar-31-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <UnicornChessman: Is literally *everyone* too dull to notice that Alonzo is Morphy's UNCLE, not FATHER???!!! It says so in his one-sentence-long description of himself on this very profile! Uncle, people. Not father!!!>

Message received and understood.
UNCLE, not FATHER???!!!
UNCLE, not FATHER???!!!

Sep-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: What exactly is <congestion of the brain>, you ask? http://history-sites.com/cgi-bin/bb...
Sep-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Congestion of the brain> normally occurs when someone reads an extremely long word, such as Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaft.

This word enters the retina and travels along the optic nerve. However, when it reaches the optic chiasma it finds itself unable to turn in the small space involved. A bit like a stretch limo in a small street.

Before the word can complete the manoeuvre, other words have started backing up behind it.

This leads to brain congestion and a immediate death.

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