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fredthebear
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  1. "Knot Two Night, Sweet Pea" She tells Freddybear
    Compiled by Fredthebear

    The monstrous Two Knights defense to the Italian game is in another entire collection by itself.

    Patience is a virtue.

    * Here are 13 C-K, 2 Knts. games: Game Collection: Caro-Kann Two Knights

    * Good Historical Links:
    https://www.saund.co.uk/britbase/in...

    * Many gambits from all openings by ECO code: https://www.jimmyvermeer.com/openin...

    * Oskar plays 1e4: Oskar Oglaza

    * Feeling Punny? Don't tell Fredthebear. Use the Submission Page: Pun Submission Page

    * Chess Records: https://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/record...

    “People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.” ― George Orwell

    Filomena wrote:

    A Tactical Appeal
    On this one bit I will not yield:
    When on a modern battlefield
    Where not one thought can be concealed
    As hidden things can be revealed

    You Shouldn't Wield a Wooden Shield

    The Earthen Pot and the Iron Pot

    An iron pot proposed
    To an earthen pot a journey.
    The latter was opposed,
    Expressing the concern he
    Had felt about the danger
    Of going out a ranger.
    He thought the kitchen hearth
    The safest place on earth
    For one so very brittle.
    "For you, who art a kettle,
    And have a tougher skin,
    There's nothing to keep you in."
    "I'll be your body-guard,"
    Replied the iron pot;
    "If anything that's hard
    Should threaten you a jot,
    Between you I will go,
    And save you from the blow."
    This offer him persuaded.
    The iron pot paraded
    Himself as guard and guide
    Close at his cousin's side.
    Now, in their tripod way,
    They hobble as they may;
    And eke together bolt
    At every little jolt, –
    Which gives the crockery pain;
    But presently his comrade hits
    So hard, he dashes him to bits,
    Before he can complain.

    Take care that you associate
    With equals only, lest your fate
    Between these pots should find its mate.

    "Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground." ― Theodore Roosevelt

    500 games, 1804-2022

  2. "Maneuvering Against Weaknesses" - Author Unknow
    * http://www.wesdel.com/FarragutCC/Le...

    Positional Concept: Maneuvering Against Weaknesses

    This “maneuvering against weaknesses” study is in 2 parts:

    Play against a weak pawn/square
    Play Against 2 Weaknesses

    First a definition. What is a “weakness?” A weakness is a point in the enemy position that can be attacked. If it cannot be attacked then it is not a true weakness. Just because a pawn is doubled, backward or isolated doesn’t in itself mean its weak, its only weak if it can be attacked.

    Part 1 Play against weak pawns/squares
    This first example is from the play of a then 13 year old Bobby Fischer it demonstrates in the simplest way the idea of play against a weakness. This game ends in a hard fought draw but the idea is more important than the result. 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O O-O 5. d3 d6 6. e4 c5 7. Nbd2 Nc6 8. a4 a6 9. Nc4 Rb8 10. a5 White has fixed the b7 pawn as a potential weakness 10…Be6 11. Nfd2 d5 12. exd5 Bxd5 13. Nb3 Bxg2 14. Kxg2 Nd4 15. Nxd4 cxd4 16. Bf4 Rc8 17. Be5 Qd5+ 18. Qf3 Qxf3+ 19. Kxf3 Nd5 20. Bxg7 Kxg7 21. Rfe1 e6 22. Ra3! Going after the weak b7 pawn 22…Rfd8 23. Rb3 Rc7 24. Ke2! The king is going to protect the c-pawn and liberate his knight 24…Ne7 25. Kd2 Nc6 26. Rb6 Rd5 27. Ra1 Kf8 28. Ra3 Ke7 29. Rab3 Black is passive but he manages to hold the game. 29…Nd8 30. f4 g5 31. fxg5 Rxg5 32. Nd6 Rgc5 33. c4 dxc3+ 34. bxc3 Rxa5 35. Nxb7 Ra2+ 36. Ke3 Rxh2 37. Nxd8 Kxd8 38. Rxa6 Ke7 1/2-1/2 Fischer-Popel, Oklahoma City, Ok 1956

    In the next game black leaves himself with a weak pawn which white is able to attack. 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bg5 Ne4 5.Bh4 c5 6.cxd5 Nxc3 7.bxc3 Qxd5 8.e3 cxd4?! much better is 8…♗g7! 9. ♘f3 ♘c6 10. ♗e2 cxd4 11. cxd4 0-0 = 9.Qxd4! Qxd4 10.cxd4 Nc6 11.Bb5 Bd7 12.Nf3 Bg7 13.O-O e6 a weakening move and unfortunately necessary in order for black to be able to castle 14.Rab1 O-O 15.Nd2! whites threat is Ne4 aiming at c5, d6 and f6 with a strategically won game, in order to prevent this black weakens himself further 15…f5 blacks e-pawn is now a serious weakness 16.Nb3 b6 17.Rfc1 Rac8 18.Ba6 Rce8 19.Bb7 Nd8 20.Rc7 Rf7 21.Ba6 Ba4 22.Rbc1 Bf8 23.R1c4 Rxc7 24.Rxc7 Nc6 25.Bc4 Bg7 26.Rc8 winning the weak pawn by force 26…Rxc8 27.Bxe6+ Kf8 28.Bxc8 the resulting endgame has some technical difficulties 28…Nb4 29.Nc1 Kf7 30.Bg3 Bf8 31.Bb7 Ke6 32.Bb8 Kd7 33.Bf3 Bb5 34.Bd1 a5 35.a4 Bc4 36.g4 b5 37.gxf5 gxf5 38.Be5 Nc6 39.Bh8 Ba3 40.axb5 Bxc1 41.bxc6 Kxc6 42.Ba4+ Kd5 43.Bc2 Ke6 44.Kg2 Ba3 45.Be5 Bf8 46.Bc7 Bd5+ 47.f3 Bb4 48.Kg3 Kf6 49.Be5+ Kg6 50.Kf4 Be6 51.Ba4 Bf8 52.e4 Bh6+ 53.Kg3 fxe4 54.fxe4 Bd2 55.d5 Be1+ 56.Kf3 Bh3 57.Be8+ Kh6 58.Bf6 1-0 Taimanov-Uhlmann, Belgrade 1970

    In the section on "Restraint" we saw one game that demonstrated the idea of restraining the advance of a pawn majority and then attacking them by a "minority attack." This next game shows the use of the minority attack to create a pawn weakness in the enemy position which then becomes the object of attack. 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 c6 7. Qc2 g6 8. e3 Bf5 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 O-O 11. O-O Re8 12. Bxf6 drawing away the bishop from control of b4 12...Bxf6 13. b4 starting the minority attack 13...Nd7 14. b5 Nb6 15. bxc6 bxc6 the game now revolves around the newly created weakness on c6 16. Rac1 Be7 17. Rc2 Bd6 18. Nb1 Rc8 19. Rfc1 Qf6 [indirectly defending the c6 pawn as 20. Rxc6?? loses to 20...Rxc6 21. Rxc6 Bxh2+ followed by 22...Qxc6] 20. Nbd2 Rc7 21. g3 restricting the scope of black bishop and givng the white king "luft" or air and now 22. Rxc6 is a real threat 21...Rec8 22. Kg2 Qe7 23. e4! gaining space in the center. notice 23...dxe4 simply helps to activate whites knight 23...Bb4 24. h4 Qd8 25. e5 gaining more space 25...c5 26. dxc5 Rxc5 27. Rxc5 Rxc5 28. Rxc5 Bxc5 white now fixes d5 as a target 29. Nb3 Be7 30. Nbd4 Qc8 31. Qb5 Kf8 32. Nc6 Qb7 33. Nfd4 a6 34. Qa5 Ke8 blacks king is now exposed to a decisive attack 35. Nxe7 Kxe7 36. Qc5+ Ke8 37. e6 Nc8 38. exf7+ Kxf7 39. Nc6 Kg7 40. Qd4+ Kh6 41. Qf6 1-0 Averbakh-Donner, Beverwijk 1962

    This following game demonstrates when doubled pawns are a weakness and how to maneuver against them. 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 Nc6 7.Bd3 O-O 8.Ne2 b6 9.e4 Ne8 10.Be3 d6 11.O-O Na5! Black has no weaknesses in his camp and is well positioned to defend his kingside. White however has a pawn weakness at c4 which can be attacked. 12.Ng3 Ba6 13.Qe2 Qd7! A strong move. The Black Queen can now go to a4 to increase pressure on c4 and also allows black to play...f5. 14.f4 f5! Black is no hurry to win the c-pawn. The text suppresses whites threats on the b1-h7 diagonal and helps to ensure the defense of his kingside once this is achieved he can win the c4 pawn and with it the game. 15.Rae1 g6! White has no clear object of attack on the kingside while whites queenside weaknesses are permanent pawn structure defects. 16.Rd1 Qf7 17.e5 Rc8 [if 18. exd6 Nxd6 and the c5 pawn is defended] 18.Rfe1 dxe5! 19.dxe5 Ng7 Blacks kingside is a fortress 20.Nf1 Rfd8 21.Bf2 Nh5! 22.Bg3 [Not 22.g3 as this would lead to defeat along the h1-a8 diagonal after 22...Qe8 23...Qc6 and 24...Bb7] 22...Qe8 23.Ne3 Qa4 Now Black has achieved a strong Q-side atack while stifling his opponent 24.Qa2 Nxg3 25.hxg3 h5 26.Be2 Kf7 27.Kf2 Qb3 28.Qxb3 Nxb3 29.Bd3 Ke7 30.Ke2 Na5 31.Rd2 Rc7 32.g4 Rcd7 33.gxf5 gxf5 34.Red1 h4 35.Ke1 Nb3 36.Nd5+ exd5 37.Bxf5 Nxd2 38.Rxd2 dxc4 39.Bxd7 Rxd7 40.Rf2 Ke6 41.Rf3 Rd3 42.Ke2 0-1 Botvinnik-Reshevsky, The Hague, WC tournament 1948

    The creation and control of weak squares is one of the major themes of chess because weak squares affect the strength of your pieces according to GM Yasser Seirawan in “Winning Chess Strategies.” The next game demonstrates this idea of creating and playing against weak squares. 1. c4 c5 2. b3 Nf6 3. Bb2 g6 4. Bxf6! creating a weakness at d5 which he hopes to exploit. 4…exf6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. g3 Nc6 7. Bg2 f5 8. e3 O-O 9. Nge2 intending to add to is control of d5 by an eventual Nf4 9…a6 10. Rc1 b5 11. d3 Bb7 12. O-O d6 13. Qd2 Qa514. Rfd1 Rab8 15. Nd5 white now occupied the weak square which is a strong outpost for his pieces (see outpost stations) 15…Qxd2 16. Rxd2 b4 17. d4 Rfd8 18. Rcd1 cxd4 19. exd4 Kf8 20. c5 Na7 21. Ne3 avoiding the exchange of his strong knight 21…Bxg2 22. Kxg2 dxc5 23. dxc5 Rxd2 24. Rxd2 Rc8 25. Nd5 Rxc5 26. Nxb4 white has emerged with a q-side majority in the ending 26…a5 27. Nd5 Rc6 28. Ne3 Rc5 29. Nf4 Bh6 30. Rd5 Rxd5 31. Nfxd5 Bxe3 32. Nxe3 Ke7 33. Nc4 Nc6 34. Kf3 Ke6 35. Ke3 Kd5 36. a3 Ke6 37. Kd3 Kd5 38. f3 h6 39. Kc3 h5 40. Kd3 f6 41. f4 g5 42. Ne3+ Ke6 43. h4 gxh4 44. gxh4 Ne7 45. Kc4 whites superior king position guarantees him the win. 45…Ng6 46. Ng2 Kd6 47. Kb5 Kd5 48. Kxa5 Ke4 49. b4 Kf3 50. b5 Kxg2 51. b6 Nf8 52. Kb5 Nd7 53. a4 Nxb6 54. Kxb6 Kf3 55. a5 Kxf4 56. a6 Ke3 57. a7 f4 58. a8=Q f3 59. Qe8+ 1-0 Karpov-Browne, San Antonio 1972

    Here is one more example of the creation of a weak square, which is used to create additional targets in the enemy camp. 1. e4 e6 2. d3 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O Nge7 7. c3 O-O 8. d4 d6 9. dxc5 White makes this simple capture to draw blacks d-pawn from d6 which allows white to advance his e-pawn and obtain a grip on d6 and f6 squares 9…dxc5 10. Qe2 b6 11. e5! The point. White now plans Bf4 helping to control d6 or Bg5 (aiming at f6), as well as moves like Nge2, and Rd1 with all his pieces aiming at the strategic weak point at d6. Black must try to prevent this plan or achieve counterplay.11…a5 12. Re1 Ba6 13. Qe4 Ra7 14. Nbd2 Bd3 15. Qh4 Nd5 16. Qxd8 Rxd8 17. a4 Rad7 18. Bf1 Bxf1 19. Kxf1 Nde7 20. Nc4 (controlling d6 and attacking the weakness at b6) 20…Nc8 21. Bg5 N6e7 22. Nfd2 h6 23. Bxe7 Rxe7 24. Ra3 Rc7 25. Rb3 (the b6 pawn is the object of attack) 25…Rc6 26. Ne4 (both knights now hit at d6) 26…Bf8 27. Ke2 Be7 28. f4 Kf8 29. g4 Ke8 30. Rf1 Rd5 31. Rf3 Rd8 32. Rh3 Bf8 33. Nxa5 Rc7 34. Nc4 Ra7 35. Nxb6 Nxb6 36. Rxb6 Rda8 37. Nf6+ Kd8 38. Rc6 Rc7 39. Rd3+ Kc8 40. Rxc7+ Kxc7 41. Rd7+ Kc6 42. Rxf7 c4 43. Nd7 Bc5 44. Nxc5 Kxc5 45. Rc7+ Kd5 46. b4 1-0 Fischer-Durao, Havana 1966.

    Play Against 2 Weaknesses
    In the last example above we saw Fischer create a weak square (d6) and then use pressure to eventually attack a second enemy weakness (the b6 pawn). This is a good lead in to the subject of Nimzovich’s theory on the “2 theatres of war.” The idea of play in 2 theatres of war (similarly) is explained thusly by Nimzovich, “we engage one wing, or the obvious weakness in it, and thus draw the other enemy wing out of its reserve, when new weaknesses will be created on the reserve wing, and so the signal is given for systematic maneuvering against those two weaknesses.” IM Silman states in “Complete Book of Chess Strategy,” “The principle of two weaknesses states that the creation of a second weakness (or advantage) stretches the enemy’s ability to resist to unmanageable proportions.” Here is a good example of Nimzovich “2 theatres of war” from one of his games: 1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 d5 4. exd5 exd5 5. Bg5 Be7 6. Bxe7 Qxe7+ 7. Qe2 Bf5 8. c3 Be4 9. Nbd2 O-O-O 10. O-O-O Nh6 11. Ne5 Nxe5 12. dxe5 Bg6 planning a campaign against the e-pawn using the long light-squared diagonal, especially the point e4 13. Nf3 Rhe8 14. Qe3 Kb8 15. Qf4 Be4 16. Re1 Qc5 17. Nd2 Bg6 18. Nb3 Qb6 19. Qd4 f6 20. f4 fxe5 21. fxe5 [21. Rxe5 Rxe5 22. Qxe5 Re8] 21... Be4 the e-pawn is doomed 22. Nd2 c5 23. Qe3 [23. Qa4 Rxe5 24. Nxe4 dxe4 25. Rxe4 Qe6 26. Rxe5 Qxe5 with a winning attack] 23... Rxe5 24. Qg3 Qc7 25. Bd3 Rde8 26. Bxe4 dxe4 27. Nc4 R5e6 28. Qxc7+ Kxc7 29. Ne3 Nf7 30. Kc2 Nd6 31. c4 Kc6 32. Rhf1 Rh6! 33. h3 Rg6 34. Re2 a6 35. Rf4 b5 [Black plays on both wings] 36. b3 Rg5 37. g4 Rge5 38. Kc3 a5 [Black will open a file on the Queen's-side for his Rooks] 39. Ref2 a4 40. bxa4 bxc4! [a temporary pawn sacrifice] 41. Rf8 [41. Nxc4 Nxc4 42. Kxc4 Ra8 is clearly bad giving up the blockader and losing a pawn to boot] 41... R5e7 [White must not be allowed counterplay, particularly not a Rook on the eighth] 42. Rxe8 Rxe8 43. Nxc4 Nxc4 44. Kxc4 Ra8 The Black Rook now gets in on the Queen's-side, to attack Pawns on the King's-side 45. Rf7 Rxa4+ 46. Kb3 Rb4+ 47. Kc3 Rb7 48. Rf5 Ra7 49. Kc4 Ra4+ 50. Kb3 Rd4 51. Re5 Kd6 52. Re8 Rd3+ 53. Kc4 Rxh3 54. Rxe4 Ra3 White can no longer defend the Two Wings 55. Re2 Ra4+ 56. Kb5 Rxg4 57. a4 Rb4+ 58. Ka5 h5 59. Rd2+ Kc6 60. Re2 Rg4 61. Re6+ Kd5 62. Re8 h4 63. Rd8+ Kc4 64. Kb6 h3 65. Rd1 [65. Rh8 Rg6+ 66. Kb7 Rh6] 65... Kb4 66. Rb1+ Kxa4 67. Kxc5 g5 68. Rh1 Rg3 69. Kd5 g4 70. Ke5 Rg2 71. Kf4 h2 0-1 Holzhausen – Nimzovitch, Hanover 1926.

    Here is another example of play against 2 weaknesses. 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. Nc3 Nf6 5. d3 d6 6. Bg5 Na5 7. Bb3 Nxb3 8. axb3 Be6 9. Na4 h6 10. Bh4 Bg4 11. Nxc5 dxc5 12.h3 Bxf3 13. Qxf3 Qd6 14. Bxf6 Qxf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 Black has doubled f-pawns that can be immediately attacked by O-O and f2-f4 16. Ra5! Stronger than the immediate attack against the f-pawns. White Forces a second permanent weakness on a7. Black now has 2 serious weaknesses the doubled f-pawns and a7. [16. O-O Ke7 17. f4 h5 18. Rf2 Rh7 19. Raf1 and Black can defend the one weakness on the f-file.] 16... b6 17. Ra6 Kd7 18. O-O Kc6 19. f4 Kb7 20. Raa1 Rh7 21. fxe5 fxe5 22. Rf6 White now wins a pawn while Black struggles for counterplay. 22... a5 23. Rf5 Re8 24. Raf1 Re7 25. Rh5 Re6 26. Rhf5 Re7 27. g4 Kc6 28. Rf6+ Kb5 29. R1f5 a4 30. bxa4+ Kxa4 31. Rh5 c4 32. dxc4 Kb4 33. Rhxh6 Rxh6 34. Rxh6 Rd7 35. Rf6 Kxc4 36. Kf2 Rd2+ 37. Ke3 Rh2 [37... Rxc2 doesn't help, e.g. 38. Rxf7 c5 39. Rf2 Rxf2 40. Kxf2 Kb3] 38. Rc6+ Kb5 39. Rxc7 Rxh3+ 40. Kf2 Rh2+ 41. Kg3 Re2 42. Kf3 Re1 43. Re7 f6 44. g5 fxg5 45. Rxe5+ Kc4 46. Rxg5 Rf1+ 47. Ke2 Rb1 48. b3+ Kc3 49. Rb5 Rc1 50. Rxb6 Rxc2+ 51. Ke3 1-0 Hug-Barle, Pula 1975

    A very clear example of play against 2 weaknesses can be seen in the following game: 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nf3 Nbd7 7. Qc2 c5 8. Rd1 Qa5 9. Bd3 h6 10. Bh4 cxd4 11. exd4 dxc4 12. Bxc4 Nb6 13. Bb3 Bd7 14. O-O Rac8 15. Ne5 Bb5 16. Rfe1 Nbd5 17. Bxd5 Nxd5 18. Bxe7 Nxe7 19. Qb3 Bc6 20. Nxc6 bxc6 21. Re5 Qb6 22. Qc2 Rfd8 there are two isolated pawns: which is weaker? 23. Ne2 Rd5 24. Rxd5 cxd5 now there is only one. It is not exposed on a half-open file, so can White defend? 25. Qd2 Nf5 26. b3 h5 27. h3 h4 a typical preparatory probe 28. Qd3 Rc6 29. Kf1 g6 30. Qb1 Qb4 Black's pressure on the d-pawn cannot be increased. So Black opens up a new point of attack. 31. Kg1 a5 32. Qb2 a4 33. Qd2 Qxd2 34. Rxd2 axb3 35. axb3 Rb6 36. Rd3 Ra6 37. g4 hxg3 38. fxg3 Ra2 39. Nc3 Rc2 40. Nd1 Ne7 41. Nc3 Rc1+ 42. Kf2 Nc6 43. Nd1 Rb1 Black has his two points of attack. 44. Ke2 [44. Ne3 Na5 picks up the b-pawn as well] 44... Rxb3 45. Ke3 Rb4 46. Nc3 Ne7 47. Ne2 Nf5+ 48. Kf2 White still has two points to defend. 48... g5 49. g4 Nd6 50. Ng1 Ne4+ 51. Kf1 Rb1+ 52. Kg2 Rb2+ 53. Kf1 Rf2+ 54. Ke1 Ra2 55. Kf1 Kg7 56. Re3 Kg6 57. Rd3 f6 58. Re3 Kf7 59. Rd3 Ke7 60. Re3 Kd6 61. Rd3 Rf2+ 62. Ke1 Rg2 63. Kf1 Ra2 Both sides are repeating moves: Capablanca because he can, Lasker because he has to! 64. Re3 e5 the final push: Black creates a passed pawn 65. Rd3 exd4 66. Rxd4 Kc5 67. Rd1 d4 68. Rc1+ Kd5 0-1 White is in zugzwang. Lasker- Capablanca, Havana 1921.

    Lastly here is one final example showing how play against 2 weaknesses can create further weaknesses. 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 Nbd7 7.Nxc4 Nb6 8.e3 e6 9.a5 Nxc4 10.Bxc4 a6 11.f3 Bg6 12.O-O Be7 13.e4 O-O 14.Bf4 h6 15.Rf2 Rc8 16.Rd2 Nh5 17.Be3 Bg5 18.Qe1 Bxe3+ 19.Qxe3 Qg5 20.Qxg5 hxg5 21.Kf2 Rfd8 22.Ke3 Nf6 23.Na4 Nd7 24.g3 Kf8 25.b4 Ke7 26.Nc5 Nxc5 27.bxc5 Rd7 28.Rb2 f6 29.Rab1 Rcc7 Shirov comments, “One weakness, the b7 pawn has been securely fixed…but as a child I learned that for victory I need at least one more weakness. And it turns out to be the g7 pawn.” 30.h4 gxh4 31.gxh4 Bf7 32.e5! “The point of my idea. When white begins to attack g7, the b7 pawn will no longer be in need of defense-which means the e6 pawn will be another weakness.” 32…f5 33.Rg1 g6 34.Rbg2 Rc8 35.Rxg6 f4 36.Kd3 Rcd8 37.Rf6 Rxd4+ 38.Kc3 Rd1 39.Rg7 Rc1+ 40.Kb3 Rb1+ 41.Kc2 1-0 Shirov-Kinsman, Paris 1992.

    - AUTHOR UNKNOWN

    (Fredthebear gathered this collection for chessgames.)

    ‘May your Departures equal your Landfalls!’


    17 games, 1921-2022

  3. "Tal's Tournament and Matches 1949-1973" per JFQ
    Compiled by jessicafischerqueen!! Thank you jessicafischerqueen!!

    This metacollection is the first half of a project meant to feature every known tournament and match Mikhail Tal played in his career. The second half can be found here: Game Collection: Tal's Tournament and Matches 1974-1992

    There are many links to <Tournament Pages> and supplementary games collections here, and I will provide at least one game from each event, except where no game appears to be available.

    If you find any errors or you know of an event I missed, please leave a note for me in my forum:

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    ######################################

    <Riga Junior Championship Semifinal 1949> Tal won his first 3 games. He had a 4th category rating. [Mikhail Tal, "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal" (Cadogan 1997), p.19; Hilary Thomas, "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959" (Batsford 1980), p.2 ]

    <Riga Junior Championship 1949> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.2 ]

    <Ratmir Kholmov Simultaneous Exhibition 1949> In Riga. ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.2 ]

    <Riga Palace of Pioneers Championship 1949> ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.34-37; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.2-3 ]

    <Tournament of Pioneer's Palaces of the 3 Baltic Republics 1949> In Vilnius. 2d board for Riga, with +1 -3 =0. Tal won the "most interesting game" prize for his victory over an Estonian player- a "luxurious edition of Tolstoy's 'Peter the First.'" Riga finished last. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.20; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.3 ]

    <Riga Junior Club Championship 1949> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.3 ]

    <USSR Junior Championship 1949> In Riga. ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.3-4 ]

    <USSR Republics Junior Team Championship Semifinal 1949> In Yaroslavl. 8th board for Latvia, with +1 -? =?. Latvia finished 4th in semifinal "A group," behind Estonia, Lithuania and Belarus. Latvia did not make it to the final, held in Moscow. There appears to be no surviving game from this event. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.20; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.5; Olimpbase "USSR Other Championships-Soviet Junior Team Chess Championship-1949" http://www.olimpbase.org/; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... ]

    <Latvian Junior Championship 1950> In Riga. [Alexander Khalifman et al, "Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD); "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.5 ]

    <Riga Championship Quarterfinal 1950> 1st, with 12.5/13. Tal achieved 1st category rank. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.23; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.7 ]

    <Riga Championship Semifinal 1950> ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.23; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.7-8 ]

    <Riga Championship 1951> (14 Jan - 18 Feb) Shared 10th, behind Koblents, Zagoriansky and Pasmans, with +5 -6 =8. Based on this result, Tal was invited to play in the Latvian championship. [Gino Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955" (McFarland 2010), pp.64-65; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.23; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.9 ]

    <Latvian Championship 1951> In Riga (3 March - 1 April) Shared 9th, behind Pasman, Koblents, Akmentinsh and others, with +5 -6 =8. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.65; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Edward Winter, ed. "World Chess Champions" (Pergamon Press 1981), p.153 ]

    <USSR Republics Junior Team Championship Semifinal 1951> In Kishinev. Latvia beat Moldavia and progressed to the final in Leningrad. There may be no surviving game from this event. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.22; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.9 ]

    <USSR Republics Junior Team Championship Final 1951> In Leningrad. 3d board for Latvia, scoring 3.5. Latvia finished 5th, behind Moscow, Ukraine, Leningrad and RSFSR, ahead of Kyrgystan, Lithuania, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Uzbekistan. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.22; Olimpbase "USSR Other Championships-Soviet Junior Team Chess Championship" http://www.olimpbase.org/; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," pp. 93-94; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.9 ]

    <Riga 1st Category Tournament 1951> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.12-14 ]

    <Riga Championship Semifinal 1952> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.15-16 ]

    <Riga Championship 1952> ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.37-41; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.16-18 ]

    <Riga Club Championship 1952> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.18 ]

    <Latvian Championship Quarterfinal 1952> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.18 ]

    <Latvian Championship 1952> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvian Championship 1952 In Riga (20 Feb - 20 March) 7th, behind Klavins, Pasman, Balinsh and others, with +7 -4 =6. [Winter, p.153; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.164 ]

    <Latvian Junior Championship 1952> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.21 ]

    <Latvian Championship Semifinal 1953> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.22-23 ]

    <Latvian Championship 1953> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvian Championship 1953 In Riga (20 Feb - 22 March) 1st over Koblents, Gipslis, Klovans, Pasman and Zdanovs, with +12 -2 =5. Tal was awarded the title of Candidate Master. [Winter, p.153; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.280; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.22,25 ]

    <USSR Republics Junior Team Championship 1953> In Kharkov. 1st board for Latvia. Latvia finished 1st in "Final group 2," over Armenia, Lithuania, Estonia, Uzbekistan and Kirgizia. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.26; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... ]

    <Riga Championship 1953> ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.49-53; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.28-29 ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1953> In Leningrad (September) 2d board for Latvia, with +3 -1 =3. Latvia finished 4th, behind Leningrad, RSFSR and Moscow, ahead of Ukraine, Georgia, Belarus and Estonia. Tal achieved his master norm, but so had Klavins, who had gained more points on 3d board. Klavins was awarded the master title, but Tal had to play a match against Saigin in order to gain his title. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.26; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," pp.305-307 ]

    <Tallinn-Riga Match 1954> In Tallinn. 1st board vs. Keres, with +0 -1 =1. Tal's loss in game one was the first time he played a grandmaster in a tournament. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.27; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.425 ]

    <Latvian Championship 1954> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvian Championship 1954 In Riga (12 Feb - 14 March) Shared 2nd with Gipslis, behind Klovans, ahead of Klavins, Pasman, Skuya and Zilber, with +14 -3 =2. [Winter, p.153; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.385; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.32-35 ]

    <Master Title Qualification Match 1954> Game Collection: Tal-Saigin Master Title Qualification Match 1954 In Riga (summer). Tal beat Saigin +4 -2 =8. Although he should have received the Soviet master title at this point, in his autobiography Tal explains that he was not actually awarded the title until after he played in the <USSR Clubs Team Championship>, which was held 3-17 September in Riga:

    "The year (1954) was concluded at home, in Riga, by the Team Championship of the Country, only this time for adults. Here for the first time I won against a Grandmaster, the USSR champion Yuri Averbakh. After this, still a candidate master, I drew a couple of games, and then received notification that I was a master."

    "...although formally I took part with the 'rank' of candidate master, the decision was expected to arrive literally any day."

    Yuri Averbakh says this story is a myth, and that Tal was indeed awarded the master title shortly after his match with Saigin. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.409; Winter, p.155; http://al20102007.narod.ru/matches/... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.28-31, 55; Yuri Averbakh, "Centre-Stage and Behind the Scenes" Steve Giddins transl. (New In Chess 2011), pp.143-144 ]

    <USSR Republics Junior Team Championship 1954> In Leningrad (9-23 Aug) 1st board for Latvia, scoring 7/9. Latvia finished 3d, behind RSFSR and Moscow, ahead of Leningrad, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Lithuania, Armenia and Estonia. [http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.30 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship 1954> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1954 In Riga (3-17 Sept) 4th board for Daugava, with +1 -3 =6. Daugava finished 10th, behind Spartak (Petrosian), Nauka (Korchnoi), Medik (Chistiakov), Lokomotiv (Aronin), Trud (Suetin), Iskra (Taimanov), Dinamo (Lisitsin), Zenit (Averbakh) and Soviet Army (Kan). Tal's win against Averbakh was his first victory over a grandmaster. Tal states this was when he was awarded the Soviet master title. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.30-31; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," pp.416-418; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1954sc/195... http://www.olimpbase.org/1954sc/195... http://www.olimpbase.org/1954sc/195... ]

    <Riga Championship 1954> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.44-46 ]

    <Latvian Championship 1955> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvian Championship 1955 In Riga (14 Jan - 1 Feb) 2nd, behind Gipslis, ahead of Klasups, Zdanovs, Klavins, Zilber and Koblents, with +11 -2 =6. [Winter, p.153; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.493 ]

    <USSR Championship Quarterfinal 1955> In Vilnius (5 May - 3 June) Shared 3rd with Chukaev, behind Kholmov and Nei, ahead of Gipslis, Klasups and Lein, with +7 -2 =8. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.507; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.31-33 ]

    <Latvia-RSFSR Match 1955> In Riga (13 July - 1 Aug) 2nd board, with +4 -2 =5. RSRSR beat Latvia 66.5 - 54.5 [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.523; http://al20102007.narod.ru/matches/... ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1955> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Republics Team Championship 1955 In Lugansk (4-27 Sept) (Lugansk was called Voroshilovgrad between 1935-1958). Tal says this event was played some time between (Feb-May). Bronze medal on 2nd board for Latvia, with <+2 -0 =7.> Latvia finished 4th, behind RSFSR, Leningrad and Ukraine, ahead of Moscow, Estonia, Lithuania, Belarus, Georgia and Uzbekistan. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.31; http://www.olimpbase.org/1955st/195... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," pp.518-520; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luhansk ]

    <USSR Championship Semifinal 1955> In Riga (15 Nov - 13 Dec) 1st over Borisenko, Bannik, Zurakhov, Korchnoi, Boleslavsky, Gregenidze and Furman, with +10 -3 =5. [Winter, p.153; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1951-1955," p.492; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.33-34 ]

    USSR Championship (1956) <23d USSR Championship> In Leningrad (10 Jan - 15 Feb) Shared 5th with Polugaevsky and Kholmov, behind Spassky, Taimanov, Averbakh and Korchnoi, with +6 -2 =9. [Bernard Cafferty and Mark Taimanov, "The Soviet Championships" (Cadogen 1998), pp. 88-91; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.60-61 ]

    <Uppsala Student Olympiad 1956> Game Collection: Tal at the Uppsala Student Olympiad 1956 (5-15 April) Gold medal on 3rd board, with +5 -0 =2. The USSR 1st over Hungary, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Spain, Czechoslovakia, Romania and the USA. This was Tal's first event outside the Soviet Union. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.62; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1956y/1956... http://www.olimpbase.org/1956y/1956... http://www.olimpbase.org/1956y/1956... Gino Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960" (Mcfarland, 2010), pp.89-91 ]

    <Tartu-Riga Match 1956> In Tartu, Estonia. Tal 5th in individual standings, with +1 -1 =2. Riga beat Tartu 8.5 - 7.5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.96; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.62 ]

    <USSR Championship Semifinal 1956> In Tbilisi (18 Nov - 18 Dec) Shared 5th with Gurgenidze, behind Petrosian, Furman, Antoshin and Korchnoi, with +6 -2 =11. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.71; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.153 ]

    USSR Championship (1957) <24th USSR Championship> In Moscow (20 Jan - 22 Feb) 1st, over Bronstein, Keres, Spassky, Tolush, Kholmov, Korchnoi, Petrosian and Boleslavsky, with +9 -2 =10. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.92-95; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.153 ]

    <Reykjavik Student Olympiad 1957> Game Collection: Tal at the Reykjavik Student Olympiad 1957 (11-26 July) Tal scored +7 -0 =3 on 1st board. According to <Olimpbase>, this gave Tal the gold medal, but according to http://www.suomenshakki.fi/arkisto/..., the medal rankings were "calculated directly from points scored and not, as usual, by percentages." In this case, Miroslav Filip, who played three more games than Tal, would have received the gold medal on 1st board. The USSR 1st over Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, USA, Romania, East Germany and Iceland. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," pp.184-185; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1957y/1957... http://www.olimpbase.org/1957y/1957... http://www.olimpbase.org/1957y/1957... Winter, p.153 ]

    <1st European Team Championship Final 1957> Game Collection: Tal at the 1st European Team Championship 1957 In Vienna and Baden (22-28 Aug) Shared gold medal on 4th board with Trifunović, with +2 -1 =2. The USSR finished 1st over Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, and West Germany. During the event FIDE voted to award Tal with the international grandmaster title. [Winter, p.153; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," pp.185-186; http://www.olimpbase.org/1957e/1957... http://www.olimpbase.org/1957e/1957... http://www.olimpbase.org/1957e/1957... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.66-67 ]

    <Milan-Riga Match 1957> Game Collection: Tal's Italian Tour 1957 In Milan (27-28 Oct) 1st board vs. Ferrantes, with +2 -0 =0. Riga won 8-2. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.190 ]

    <Venice-Riga Match 1957> Game Collection: Tal's Italian Tour 1957 In Venice (31 Oct - 1 Nov) 1st board vs. Szabados, with +2 -0 =0. Riga won 9.5 - .5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.193 ]

    <Reggio Emilia-Riga Match 1957> Game Collection: Tal's Italian Tour 1957 In Reggio Emilia (2-3 Nov) 1st board vs. Romani, with +2 -0 =0. Riga won 7.5 - 2. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.191 ]

    <Florence-Riga Match 1957> Game Collection: Tal's Italian Tour 1957 In Florence (4-5 Nov) 1st board vs. Scafarelli, with +1 -0 =1. Riga won 6.5 - 3.5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.188 ]

    <Rome-Riga Match 1957> Game Collection: Tal's Italian Tour 1957 In Rome (6-7 Nov) 1st board vs. Giustolisi, with +1 -0 =1. Riga won 8.5 - 1.5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.191 ]

    USSR Championship (1958) <25th USSR Championship> In Riga (12 Jan - 12 Feb) 1st over Petrosian, Bronstein, Averbakh, Polugaevsky, Spassky, Geller, Gurgenidze, Boleslavsky and Korchnoi, with +9 -3 =7. This was also a FIDE zonal tournament, giving Tal the right to play in the Portoroz interzonal. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.96-98; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.153; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.67 ]

    <Riga Team Championship 1958> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.115 ]

    <Latvian Championship 1958> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvian Championship 1958 In Riga (13 April - 11 May) 3d, behind Zilber and Gipslis, with +16 -2 =1. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.255; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Winter, p.153 ]

    <Varna Student Olympiad 1958> Game Collection: Tal at the Varna Student Olympiad 1958 (5-20 July) Gold medal on 1st board, with +7 -0 =3. The USSR 1st over Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Hungary, USA, Argentina and East Germany. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," pp.287-289; http://www.olimpbase.org/1958y/1958... http://www.olimpbase.org/1958y/1958... http://www.olimpbase.org/1958y/1958... Winter, p.153; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.73-74 ]

    Portoroz Interzonal (1958) (5 Aug - 12 Sept) 1st over Gligoric, Petrosian, Benko, Olafsson, Fischer, Bronstein and Averbakh, with +8 -1 =11. This was Tal's first international tournament in a non-team event. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.250; Winter, p.154; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.105 ]

    <Munich Olympiad 1958> Game Collection: Tal at the Munich Olympiad 1958 (1-23 Oct) Gold medal on 1st reserve board, with +12 -0 =3. Tal also won a special prize for highest percentage in the final, scoring 8/9. The USSR 1st over Yugoslavia, Argentina, USA, Czechoslovakia, East Germany and West Germany. [Árpád Földeák, "Chess Olympiads 1927-1968" Robert Ejury , Jeno Bochkor and Peter Clarke transl. (Dover 1969), pp.264-267; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," pp.281-286; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1958/1958i... http://www.olimpbase.org/1958/1958u... http://www.olimpbase.org/1958/1958f... Winter, p.153 ]

    USSR Championship (1959) <26th USSR Championship> In Tbilisi (9 Jan - 11 Feb) Shared 2d with Spassky, behind Petrosian, ahead of Taimanov, Kholmov, Polugaevsky, Averbakh, Keres, Korchnoi and Geller, with +9 -3 =7. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.99-102; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.153 ]

    <Latvian "Olympiad" 1959 (Swiss Tournament)> In Riga. ["The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.111; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," p.147 ]

    <Riga Club Match 1959> ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959," pp.147-148]

    <Estonia-Latvia Match 1959> In Talinn (18-19 April) 1st board vs. Keres, with +0 -0 =2. Latvia won 9.5 - 8.5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.385 ]

    Zuerich (1959) (19 May - 8 June) 1st over Gligoric, Fischer, Keres, Larsen and Unzicker, with +10 -2 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.374; Winter, p.153; ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1959> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Republics Team Championship 1959 In Moscow (6-15 Aug) Last place in the 1st board individual standings, behind Spassky, Nezhmetdinov, Gurgenidze, Botvinnik and Geller, with +0 -3 =3. Latvia finished 6th in "Final Group A," behind Moscow, Leningrad, Ukraine, RSFSR and Georgia. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," pp.377-379; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1959st/195... http://www.olimpbase.org/1959st/195... http://www.olimpbase.org/1959st/195... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.115 ]

    Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959) (7 Sept - 29 Oct) 1st over Keres, Petrosian, Smyslov, Fischer, Gligoric, Olafsson and Benko, with +16 -4 =8. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.310; Winter, p.153; Harry Golombek, "4th Candidates' Tournament, 1959- Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade- September 7th - October 29th" (Hardinge Simpole 2009), pp.1-272 (originally published in the BCM Quarterly No.3, 1960) ]

    <Riga International 1959> (5-21 Dec) 4th, behind Spassky, Mikenas and Tolush, ahead of Sliwa, Gipslis, Teschner, Nei and Pietzsch, with +7 -2 -4. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.352; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1959/... "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.124; Winter, p.153 ]

    Botvinnik - Tal World Championship Match (1960) In Moscow (15 March - 5 May) Tal scored +6 -2 =13 to become the 7th world chess champion. [Mikhail Tal, "Tal-Botvinnik 1960" 5th edition (Russell Enterprises, Inc. 2000), pp.6-210; Winter, p.155; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.480 ]

    <West Germany-USSR Match 1960> Game Collection: Tal at the West Germany-USSR Match 1960 In Hamburg (27 July - 5 Aug) 1st in individual standings with +7 -0 =1. The USSR won 51 -13. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," p.497; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.166; Hilary Thomas, "Complete games of Mikhail Tal 1960-66" (Batsford 1979), pp.9-11 ]

    <Leipzig Olympiad 1960> Game Collection: Tal at the Leipzig Olympiad 1960 (17 Oct - 9 Nov) Silver medal on 1st board, with +8 -1 =6. The USSR 1st over USA, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Argentina and West Germany. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1956-1960," pp.484-490; Földeák, pp.286-297; http://www.olimpbase.org/1960/1960i... http://www.olimpbase.org/1960/1960u... http://www.olimpbase.org/1960/1960f... Winter, p.153 ]

    <Prague Radio Simul 1960> Tal scored +11 -0 =9 against 20 of Czechoslovakia's strongest young players. [ "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.167 ]

    <Stockholm 1960-1961> (29 Nov 1960 - 8 Jan 1961) 1st over Uhlmann, Kotov, Book, Unzicker, Johannessen and Nilsson, with +8 -0 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963" (McFarland 2013), p.5; Winter, p.153 ]

    Tal - Botvinnik World Championship Rematch (1961) In Moscow (15 March - 12 May) Tal scored +5 -10 =6, losing his world championship title to Botvinnik. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," p.125; Winter, p.155 ]

    <2d European Team Championship Final 1961> Game Collection: Tal at the 2nd European Team Championship 1961 In Oberhausen (20 June - 2 July) 2d board, with +3 -1 =5. The USSR 1st over Yugoslavia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, West Germany and Spain. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.132-134; Winter, p.153; http://www.olimpbase.org/1961e/1961... http://www.olimpbase.org/1961e/1961... http://www.olimpbase.org/1961e/1961... ]

    Bled (1961) (3 Sept - 3 Oct) 1st over Fischer, Petrosian, Keres, Gligoric, Geller, Trifunovic, Parma, Matanovic, Biguier, Darga, Donner and Najdorf, with +11 -1 =7. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.17-18; Winter, p.154 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship Semifinal 1961> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1961 In Riga (8-19 Oct) 1st board for Daugava, with +1 -1 =1. Daugava finished 2d, behind Trud, ahead of Kalev, Dynamo, Vodnik, The Red Flag and Žalgiris. Daugava qualified for the finals in Moscow (22-29 Dec). [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," p.134; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1961sc/196... http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... ]

    USSR Championship 1961b (1961) <29th USSR Championship> In Baku (16 Nov - 20 Dec) Shared 4th with Vasiukov, behind Spassky, Polugaevsky and Bronstein, ahead of Averbakh, Taimanov, Gipslis, Keres and Smyslov, with +7 -3 =10 [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.112-115; Winter, p.154 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship Final 1961> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1961 In Moscow (22-29 Dec) 1st board for Daugava, with +0 -1 =4. Daugava finished 5th, behind Burevestnik, Avangard, Trud and Spartak, ahead of Red Army. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.130-131; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1961sc/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1961sc/196... http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... ]

    Curacao Candidates (1962) In Willemstad, Curacao (2 May - 26 June) Shared last with Filip, behind Petrosian, Keres, Geller, Fischer, Korchnoi and Benko. Tal withdrew after 21 rounds due to illness. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.237-238; Winter, p.154 ]

    <Varna Olympiad 1962> Game Collection: Tal at the Varna Olympiad 1962 (16 Sept - 10 Oct) Gold medal on 2d reserve board, with +7 -0 =6. The USSR 1st over Yugslavia, Argentina, USA, Hungary, Bulgarian, West Germany and East Germany. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.250-255; Földeák, pp.311-321; http://www.olimpbase.org/1962/1962i... Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1962/1962u... http://www.olimpbase.org/1962/1962f... ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1962> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Republics Team Championship 1962 In Leningrad (20 Oct - 2 Nov) Shared 6th with Boleslavsky in the 1st board individual standings, with +1 -0 =7. Latvia finished 4th, behind Leningrad, RSFSR and Moscow, ahead of Belarus, Ukraine, Estonia, Lithuania and Moldavia. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.243-245; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Hilary Thomas, "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1960-1966" (Arco 1979), pp.61-62; http://www.olimpbase.org/1962st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1962st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1962st/196... ]

    <Netherlands-USSR Match 1962> In The Hague (3-4 July) 4th board vs. Kramer, with +1 -0 =1. The USSR won 8.5 - 3.5. Tal's two games against Kramer appear to be unavailable. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," p.258 ]

    USSR Championship (1962) <30th USSR Championship> In Erevan (21 Nov - 20 Dec) Shared 2d with Taimanov, behind Korchnoi, ahead of Kholmov, Spassky, Stein, Aronin, Bannik and Kots, with +11 -3 =5. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.116-119; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.154 ]

    <Asztalos Memorial 1963> In Miskolc (4-26 July) 1st over Bronstein, Bilek, Szabo, Filip, Dely, Flesch, Forintos and others, with +10 -0 =5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," p.327; Winter, p.154 ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1963> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Republics Team Championship 1963 In Moscow (7-16 Aug) Tal scored +3 -2 =0 in semifinal group 1. Latvia finished 3d in the group, behind Moscow and Georgia, and thus did not qualify for final group 1. In final group 2, Tal scored +2 -0 =2, and Latvia finished 2d, behind Estonia, ahead of Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Moldavia and Armenia. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.370-372; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1963st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1963st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1963st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1963st/196... "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1960-1966," pp.74-76; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Alexander Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" (Chess Stars 1995), pp.16-21 ]

    <Capablanca Memorial 1963> Game Collection: Tal at the Capablanca Memorial 1963 In Havana (25 Aug - 24 Sept) Shared 2d with Geller and Pachman, behind Korchnoi, ahead of Ivkov, Barcza, Darga, Uhlmann, Trifunovic,Bobotsov and others, with +14 -3 =4. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," p.320; Winter, p.154; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.22-33 ]

    Moscow (1963) <Moscow Central Chess Club International> (29 Oct - 20 Nov) 2d behind Smyslov, ahead of Gligoric, Antoshin, Vladimirov, Liberzon, Keres, Simagin, Szabo and Hort, with +7 -1 =7. [Thomas, "Complete games of Mikhail Tal 1960-66," pp.84-88; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1963/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1961-1963," pp.329-330; Winter, p.154 ]

    Hastings (1963/64) (30 Dec - 8 Jan) 1st over Gligoric, Lengyel, Khasin, Norman Littlewood and Brinck-Claussen, with +5 -0 -4. [Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1964-1967" (McFarland 2013), p.2; Winter, p.154 ]

    Reykjavik (1964) (14 Jan- 2 Feb) 1st over Gligoric, Johannessen, Olafsson, Wade, Palmason and others, with +12 -0 =1. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.66; Winter, p.154; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.49-55 ]

    Amsterdam Interzonal (1964) (20 May - 21 June) Shared 1st with Smyslov, Larsen and Spassky, ahead of Stein, Bronstein, Ivkov, Reshevsky, Portisch, Gligoric and Darga. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," pp.5-6; Winter, p.154; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.56-68 ]

    <Kislovodsk International 1964> Game Collection: Tal at Kislovodsk 1964 (10-25 July) 1st over Stein, Averbakh, Bradvarevic, Liberzon, Khasin, Ciocaleta and Fuchs, with +6 -1 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.45; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1964/... Winter, p.154; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.69-74 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship Semifinal 1964> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1964 In Tallinn. Daugava finished 1st over Spartak, Kalev, Moldova, Jõud, Žalgiris, and The Red Flag. Daugava qualified for the final in Moscow. [http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1964sc/196... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.75-81 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship Final 1964> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1964 In Moscow (11-21 Oct) 1st board for Daugava. Tal shared the gold medal with Botvinnik, with +3 -0 =3. Daugava finished 6th, behind Burevestnik, Soviet Army, Spartak and Avangard, ahead of Lokomotiv. [http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," pp.96-98; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1964sc/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1964sc/196... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.75-81 ]

    USSR Championship (1964/65) <32d USSR Championship> In Kiev (25 Dec - 27 Jan) 3d, behind Korchnoi and Bronstein, ahead of Stein, Kholmov, Shamkovich, Lein, Krogius, Lutikov and Averbakh, with +9 -3 =7. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.124-127; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... ]

    <Latvian Championship 1965> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvian Championship 1965 In Riga (4-26 March) 1st over Gipslis, Klovans, Smits, Kirilov and Kapengut, with +8 -0 =6. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," pp.175-176; Winter, p.154; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... ]

    Tal - Portisch Candidates Quarterfinal (1965) In Bled (26 June - 10 July) 1st, with +4 -0 =3. Tal advanced to the semifinals. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.206; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.101-107]

    Tal - Larsen Candidates Semifinal (1965) In Bled (26 July - 8 Aug) 1st, with +3 -2 =5. Tal advanced to the final match. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.206; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.108-116 ]

    Spassky - Tal Candidates Final (1965) In Tbilisi (1-26 Nov) 2d, with +1 -4 =6. Tal was eliminated by Spassky. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.206; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.117-124 ]

    <Sarajevo 1966> Game Collection: Tal at Sarajevo 1966 (20 March - 7 April) Shared 1st with Ciric, over Ivkov, Pachman, Matulovic, Pietzsch, Janosevic, Minev, Jansa and Kotov, with +9 -2 =4. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.303; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.125-132 ]

    <Kislovodsk International 1966> Game Collection: Tal at Kislovodsk 1966 (22 July - 8 Aug) 6th, behind Geller, Stein, Kholmov, Lutikov and Fuchs, with +4 -4 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.262; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1966/... Winter, p.154; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.133-139 ]

    <Tal-Bronstein Training Match 1966> In Moscow Game Collection: Tal-Bronstein Training Match 1966 (19-20 Sept) 1st, with +1 -0 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.322; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.140-141 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship 1966> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1966 In Moscow (24 Sept - 5 Oct) 3rd board for Daugava. Shared bronze medal with Petrosian (Spartak), with +2 -0 =8. Daugava finished 6th in the final, behind Soviet Army, Trud, Spartak, Burevestnik and Avangard. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.333; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1966sc/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1966sc/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1966sc/196... "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1960-1966," pp.142-144; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.142-146 ]

    <Havana Olympiad 1966> Game Collection: Tal at the Havana Olympiad 1966 (25 Oct - 20 Nov) Gold medal on 3d board, with +11 -0 =2. The USSR 1st over USA, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Argentina, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, East Germany and Denmark. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," pp.324-332; Földeák, pp.358-372; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1966/1966i... http://www.olimpbase.org/1966/1966f... http://www.olimpbase.org/1966/1966u... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.147-153 ]

    Palma de Mallorca (1966) (27 Nov - 18 Dec) 1st over Pomar, Portisch, Ivkov, Matanovic, Pfleger, Shamkovich and O'Kelly de Galway, with +9 -0 =6. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," pp.289-290; Winter, p.154 ]

    Moscow (1967) <50th Jubilee International> (21 May - 16 June) Shared 2d with Gipslis, Bobotsov and Smyslov, behind Stein, ahead of Portisch, Bronstein, Spassky, Geller, Keres, Petrosian, Najforf, Gehorghiu and Gligoric, with +5 -2 =10. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.398; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1967/... Winter, p.154 ]

    <Yugoslavia-USSR Match 1967> In Budva (21 June - 5 July) This was an 11 round all-play-all format. Shared 2d with Gligoric, behind Korcnhoi, ahead of Gipslis, Bukic, Geller, Ciric, Ivkov, Taimanov, Bogdanovic, Minic and Suetin, with +3 -1 =7. The USSR won 43.5 - 28.5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.469 ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1967> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Republics Team Championship 1967 In Moscow (23 July - 3 Aug) 1st board for Latvia, with +1 -0 =4 in Semifinal Group 2 and +3 -0 =2 in Final Group 2. Latvia finished 3d in Semfinal Group 2, and did not qualify for Final Group 1. Latvia finished 1st in Final Group 2, over Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Estonia and Armenia. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," pp.453-462; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1967st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1967st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1967st/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1967st/196... Hilary Thomas, "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973" (Batsford 1979), pp.7-9; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.180-184 ]

    <Latvia-Romania Match 1967> In Riga (October) 1st board vs Ciocaltea, with +1 -0 =1. Romania won 11 - 9. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1964-1967," p.474; http://al20102007.narod.ru/matches/... ]

    USSR Championship (1967) <35th USSR Championship (Swiss System)> In Kharkov (7-27 Dec) Shared 1st with Polugaevsky, over Vasyukov, Taimanov, Platonov, Sakharov and Antoshin, with +7 -0 =6. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.137-140; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.154 ]

    <Wijk aan Zee 1968> Game Collection: Wijk aan Zee Hoogovens 1968 Game Collection: Tal at Wijk aan Zee 1968 (10-28 Jan) Shared 2nd with Hort and Portisch, behind Korchnoi, ahead of Gheorghiu, Ciric, Matanovic, Ivkov, Ree and Bobotsov, with +5 -2 =8. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970" (McFarland 2013), pp.92-93; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.193-200]

    Tal - Gligoric Candidates Quarterfinal (1968) In Belgrade (22 April - 14 May) 1st, with +3 -1 =5. Tal advanced to the semifinals. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.95: Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.203-209 ]

    <Tal-Korchnoi Candidates Semifinal Match 1968> Game Collection: Korchnoi - Tal Candidates Semifinal 1968 In Moscow (26 June - 15 July) 2d, with +1 -2 =7. Tal was eliminated by Korchnoi. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.95; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.210-216 ]

    <Karseladze Memorial 1968> Game Collection: Tal at the Karseladze Memorial 1968 In Gori (13-30 Nov) 1st, over Geller, Gurgenidze, Gaprindashvili, Gufeld, Dzhindzhikhashvili, Grigorian and Chikovani, with +6 -1 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.35; http://al20102007.narod.ru/nat_tour... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.217-221]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship 1968> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1968 In Riga (11-24 Dec). 1st board for Daugava. Tal finished 6th, behind Polugaevsky, Geller, Kholmov, Keres and Stein, ahead of Bronstein, Mikenas, Shamkovich, I. Zaitsev, Mozionzhik and Hermlin, with +3 -2 =6. Daugava finished 7th, behind Burevestnik, Soviet Army, Spartak, Trud, Avangard and Lokomotiv, ahead of Kalev, Moldova, Dinamo, Žalgiris and Jõud. [http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... "Complete Games of Tal 1967- 1973, p.10; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1968sc/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1968sc/196... http://www.olimpbase.org/1968sc/196... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.222-227 ]

    USSR Championship (1968/69) <36th USSR Championship 1968-1969> In Alma-Ata (30 Dec 1968 - 1 Feb 1969) Shared 6th with Vasiukov, Klovans, Podgaets and Kholmov, behind A. Zaitsev, Polugaevsky, Lutikov, Liberzon and Tseshkovsky, with +6 -4 =9. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.141-143; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Winter, p.153 ]

    <Alma-Ata Blitz Tournament 1968-1969> 1st over Vasiukov, Polugaevsky, Bagirov, Zaitsev, Lein, Gurgenidze, Tsheshkovsky, Podgaets, Lutikov and Siniavsky, with +14 -2 =1. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.128 ]

    <Tal-Larsen Candidates 3d Place Playoff Match 1969> Game Collection: Larsen - Tal 3rd place Candidates Playoff 1969 In Eersel (10-23 March) Tal lost, with +1 -4 =3. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.227; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.239-243 ]

    USSR Championship (1969) <37th USSR Championship and FIDE Zonal> In Moscow (5 Sept - 12 Oct) Shared 14th with Liberzon, behind Petrosian, Polugaevsky, Geller, Smyslov, Taimanov, Stein, Balashov, Platonov, Kholmov, Gipslis, Savon, Averkin and Zhukovitsky, with +6 -7 =9. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.144-149; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... ]

    <Goglidze Memorial International 1969-1970> Game Collection: Tal at the Goglidze Memorial 1969-1970 In Tbilisi (18 Dec 1969 - 5 Jan 1970) Shared 1st with Gurgenidze, over Hort, Gufeld, Suetin, Ciocaltea, Dzhindzhikhashvili, Spiridonov, Shamkovich, Bronstein, Kholmov, Fuchs, Haag and Kostro, Masic and Lein, with +7 -1 =7. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," pp.254-255; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1969/... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.255-260 ]

    <Moscow Blitz Tournament 1970> 2d to Vasiukov, ahead of Lein, A. Zaitsev, Chepukaitis, Gusev, Aberbakh, Tataev, Tsarev, Bolovich, Bronstein, and 13 others. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.312 ]

    <Georgian Championship 1970> In Poti. Tal competed hors concours, and finished 1st over Gurgenidze, Dzhindzhikhashvili, Ubilava, Chechelian and Buslaev, with +9 -1 =4. Gurgenidze became the Georgian champion. [http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_repub... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.324; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.394 ]

    USSR vs. Rest of the World (1970) In Belgrade (29 March - 5 April) 9th board vs Najdorf, with +1 -1 =2. The USSR won 20.5 - 19.5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.374; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1970g/1970... http://www.olimpbase.org/1970g/1970... http://www.olimpbase.org/1970g/1970... ]

    <Herceg Novi Blitz Tournament 1970> (8-9 April) 2d to Fischer, ahead of Korchnoi, Petrosian, Bronstein, Hort, Matulovic, Smyslov, Reshevsky, Uhlmann, Ivkov and Ostojic, with +12 -5 =5. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.295; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.66-69 ]

    <4th European Team Championship Final 1970> Game Collection: Tal at the 4th European Team Championship 1970 In Kapfenberg (9-18 May) Gold medal on 7th board, with +4 -0 =2. The USSR 1st over Hungary, East Germany, Yugslavia, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Spain and Denmark. [Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," pp.360-362; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1970e/1970... http://www.olimpbase.org/1970e/1970... http://www.olimpbase.org/1970e/1970... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.271-273 ]

    <USSR Cup Preliminary 1970> In Dnepropetrovsk (8-21 Aug) A match knockout format. Tal beat Bagirov +2 -0 =2; beat Gufeld +1 -0 =3; and lost to Savon +0 -1 =3. He was knocked out and thus did not advance to the final in Moscow. ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.72-75; http://al20102007.narod.ru/nat_tour... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," pp.283-286; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.274-279 ]

    <Masters vs Grandmasters Match 1970> In Sochi (13 Oct-2 Nov) 1st over Kuzmin, Tukmakov, Stein, Suetin, Kupreichik, Shamkovich, Liberzon, Podgaets and Korchnoi, with +9 -2 =3. [Victor Korchnoi, "Korchnoi's 400 Best Games" (Arco 1978), p.178; http://al20102007.narod.ru/nat_tour... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1968-1970," p.378; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.280-287 ]

    <Baltic Clubs Cup 1971> In Riga. Contested between the cities of Riga, Tallinn and Vilnius. Tal 1st board for Riga, scoring +0 -0 =1 vs. Mikenas (Vilnius), and +1 -0 =0 vs Vooremaa (Tallinn). Riga 1st with 12.5, over Tallinn with 11 and Vilnius with 6.5. [Khalifman et al, "Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.9; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.11; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.97 ]

    <Tallinn International 1971> Game Collection: Tal at Tallinn 1971 (21 Feb - 14 March) Shared 1st with Keres, over Bronstein, Stein, A. Zaitsev, Smekjal, Barcza, Furman, Vooremaa, Westerinen, Daskalov, Wade, Bisguier and Myagmarsuren, with +9 -1 =5. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.9; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1971/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.72; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.290-298 ]

    <National Blitz Tournament 1971> In Moscow (31 March) Shared 4th with Karpov, Kholmov and Vasiukiov, behind Petrosian, Korchnoi and Balashov, with +8 -4 =3. ["Byulleten Tsentralnago Shakhmatnogo Kluba SSSR 1971," no.4, p.8. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" (McFarland 2014), p.44 ]

    <Moscow Blitz Tournament 1971> 1st over Grigorian, Gufeld, Zlotnik, Vasiukov, Dzhindzhikhashvili and others, with +17 -0 =0. ["Byulleten Tsentralnago Shakhmatnogo Kluba SSSR 1971," no.6, p.16. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.46 ]

    <Fizkultura Blitz Tournament 1971> In Riga. 3rd, behind Gipslis and Smits, ahead of Kirpicikovs, Vitolins and others, with +11 -3 =1. ["Shakhmaty Riga" 1971, no.20, p.12. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.65 ]

    <Pärnu 1971> (June) Shared 2d with Keres, behind Stein, ahead of Bronstein, Karner, Etruk, Nei, Lutikov and others, with +7 -1 =5. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.9; http://al20102007.narod.ru/nat_tour... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.58 ]

    <USSR Clubs Team Championship 1971> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Clubs Team Championship 1971 In Rostov-on-Don (Semifinal 1-3 Aug; Final 5-10 Aug) Gold medal on 1st board for Daugava, with +1 -0 =2 in the preliminary and +2 -0 =1 in the final. In the preliminary Daugava finished 3d to Burevestnik and Avangard, only advancing to the Final B round, where they finished 2d to Moldova, ahead of Zenit, Dinamo and Vodnik. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.9; http://www.olimpbase.org/1971sc/197... http://www.olimpbase.org/1971sc/197... http://www.olimpbase.org/1971sc/197... http://www.olimpbase.org/1971sc/197... http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.97-100; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.306-308; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973" pp.91-92]

    USSR Championship (1971) <39th USSR Championship> In Leningrad (14 Sept - 18 Oct). Shared 2nd with Smyslov, behind Savon, ahead of Karpov, Stein, Balashov, Bronstein, Polugaevsky, Taimanov, Kapengut, Krogius, Platonov, Lein, Geller and others, with +9 -3 =9. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.154-156; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... ]

    Moscow (1971) <Alekhine Memorial> (24 Nov - 18 Dec) Shared 6th with Spassky, behind Karpov, Stein, Smyslov, Tukmakov and Petrosian, ahead of R. Byrne, Hort, Bronstein, Korchnoi, Olafsson, Gheorghiu, Savon, Uhlmann, Balashov, Parma and Lengyel, with +4 -2 =11. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1971/... Bernard Cafferty, "Tal's 100 Best Games 1961-1973" (Batsford 1975), p.165; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.45 ]

    <Leningrad-Latvia Match 1972> In Leningrad (11-13 Feb) 1st board for Latvia vs Korchnoi, with +0 -0 =2. Leningrad won 15 - 9. This was a training tournament for the upcoming USSR teams championship. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.11; http://al20102007.narod.ru/matches/... "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," p.106; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.197-198 ]

    <Baltic Capitals Championship 1972> In Vilnius. Tal scored +0 -1 =2. This was a training tournament for the upcoming USSR teams championship. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.11; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.107-108; "Shakhmaty Riga" 1972, no.8, p.6. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.195 ]

    <USSR Republics Team Championship 1972> Game Collection: Tal at the USSR Republics Team Championship 1972 In Moscow (1-13 March). Also labeled the "First USSR Olympiad." 1st board for Latvia, with +3 -1 =0 in the preliminary and +1 -0 =3 in the final, for a total of +4 -1 =3. In Preliminary Group 2, Latvia finished 2d to Moscow, ahead of Belarus, Kazakhistan and Tajikistan. Latvia qualified for Final Group A, finishing last, behind Moscow, RSFRS, Ukraine, Leningrad and Georgia. [Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1972st/197... http://www.olimpbase.org/1972st/197... http://www.olimpbase.org/1972st/197... http://www.olimpbase.org/1972st/197... "Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; http://al20102007.narod.ru/team_ch/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.183-185; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp. 333-337 ]

    <National Blitz Tournament 1972> In Moscow (11-12 May) 7th, behind Karpov, Tukmakov, Korchnoi, Kholmov, Vasiukov and Gufeld, ahead of Stein, Bronstein, Polugaevsky, Taimanov and others, with +14 -11 =7. ["Byulleten Tsentralnago Shakhmatnogo Kluba SSSR 1971," no.6, pp.8-9. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.144 ]

    <Fizkultura Blitz Tournament 1972> In Riga. 2nd, behind Luckans, ahead of Smits, Petkevics and others, with +17 -1 =1. ["Shakhmaty Riga" 1971, no.18, p.18. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.159-160 ]

    <Latvian Blitz Championship 1972> In Riga. Shared 1st with Smits, over Luckans, Vitolins, Klovans, Zilber and others, with =18 -0 =1. ["Shakhmaty Riga" 1971, no.8, recto Back-cover. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.160 ]

    <Ilmar Raud Memorial 1972> Game Collection: Tal at the Ilmar Raud Memorial 1972 In Viljandi (5-18 July) 2nd to Dvoretsky, ahead of Donchenko, Shamkovich, Suetin, Yim, Etruk and others, with +9 -1 =3. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.11; http://al20102007.narod.ru/nat_tour... Thomas, "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.112-115; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.172-173; Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.338-342 ]

    Sukhumi (1972) (16 Aug - 4 Sept) 1st over Savon, Taimanov, M. Mukhin, Beliavsky, Liberzon, Kholmov, Murey, Espig, Huebner, Honfi, Gufeld, Suttles, Ree, Kirov and Jansa, with +7 -0 =8. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," pp.11, 403-404; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1972/... Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.116-120 ]

    <Skopje Olympiad 1972> Game Collection: Tal at the Skopje Olympiad 1972 (19 Oct - 13 Nov) Gold medal on 4th board, with +12 -0 =4. The USSR 1st over Hungary, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, West Germany, Bulgaria, Romania, Netherlands, East Germany, USA and Spain. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal," p.11; Olimpbase http://www.olimpbase.org/1972/1972i... http://www.olimpbase.org/1972/1972e... http://www.olimpbase.org/1972/1972f... http://www.olimpbase.org/1972/1972u... Khalifman, ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II 1963-1972" pp.351-360 ]

    USSR Championship (1972) <40th USSR Championship> In Baku (16 Nov - 25 Dec) This was also a FIDE Zonal Tournament. 1st over Tukmakov, Kuzmin, Savon, M. Mukhin, Vasiukov, Balashov, Bagirov, Furman, Kholmov, Lein and others, with +9 -0 =12. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.157-159; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.117 ]

    <Wijk aan Zee 1973> (13 Jan - 3 Feb) 1st over Balashov, Vasukiov, Hort, Planinc, Andersson, Enklaar, Ribli, Ljubojevic, Najdorf and Szabo, with +6 -0 =9. [Winter, p.154; "Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.10; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.273-274 ]

    Tallinn (1973) (20 Feb - 13 March) 1st over Polugaevsky, Balashov, Bronstein, Spassky, Keres, Andersson, Nei, Timman and others, with +9 -0 =6. [http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1973/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.264 ]

    <Moscow Pioneer's Tournament 1973> Game Collection: Tal at the Moscow Pioneer's Tournament 1973 Six city teams competed, each team consisting of one grandmaster paired with 6 pioneers from their respective cities. Each grandmaster played a clock simul against the pioneers from each of the opposing 5 teams. Tal's Riga team finished 3d, behind Moscow (Smyslov), Leningrad (Spassky), ahead of Kiev (Bronstein), Cheliabinsk (Karpov) and Tbilisi (Petrosian). ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.148-149 ]

    <Moscow Match Tournament 1973> Game Collection: Tal at the Moscow Match -Tournament 1973 (25-29 April) 3rd board for team USSR One, with +1 -0 =1 vs Bronstein (team USSR Two); +0 -2 =0 vs Balashov (team USSR Youth). USSR One finished 1st over USSR Youth and USSR Two. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.11; http://al20102007.narod.ru/match_tm... "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.150-151; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.279-280; "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.150-151 ]

    Leningrad Interzonal (1973) (2-27 June) Shared 8th with Gligoric and Taimanov, behind Korchnoi, Karpov, Byrne, Smejkal, Huebner, Larsen and Kuzmin, with +6 -6 =5. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.11; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.233 ]

    <5th European Team Championship Final 1973> Game Collection: Tal at the 5th European Team Championship 1973 In Bath (6-13 July) 5th board, with +2 -0 =4. The USSR 1st over Yugoslavia, Hungary, Poland, West Germany, England, Romania and Switzerland. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.11; http://www.olimpbase.org/1973e/1973... http://www.olimpbase.org/1973e/1973... http://www.olimpbase.org/1973e/1973... ]

    <Chigorin Memorial 1973> Game Collection: Tal at the Chigorin Memorial 1973 In Sochi (1-22 September) 1st over Spassky, Krogius, Smejkal, Andersson, Timman, Kholmov, Suetin, Balashov and Filip, with +7 -0 =8. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.11; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1973/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.261 ]

    USSR Championship (1973) <41st USSR Championship> In Moscow (2-26 Oct) Shared 9th with Keres, Taimanov and Savon, behind Spassky, Karpov, Petrosian, Polugaevsky, Korchnoi, Kuzmin, Geller and Grigorian, with +3 -4 =10. [Cafferty and Taimanov, pp.160-163; http://al20102007.narod.ru/ch_urs/1... ]

    <Latvia-RSFSR Match 1973> Game Collection: Tal at the Latvia-RSFSR Match 1973 In Riga (21-27 Nov) 1st board for Latvia, with +2 -0 =4. RSFSR won 28 - 26. ["Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD) Event Index, p.11; http://al20102007.narod.ru/matches/... "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp.176-177; "Shakhmaty Riga" 1974, no.6, p.13. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.286 ]

    <Third Latvian Blitz Championship 1973> In Riga (December) 1st, over Smits, Vitolins, Zlotnik, Luckans, Petkevics, Zilber and others, with +17 -1 =1. ["Shakhmaty Riga" 1974, no.5, p.18. In Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.254 ]

    <Dubna International 1973> (5-26 Dec) Shared 1st with Kholmov, over Vaganian, Lutikov, Vasukiov and Espig, with +7 -0 =8. [Winter, p.154; http://al20102007.narod.ru/it/1973/... Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" pp.222-223 ]

    Hastings (1973/74) (27 Dec 1973 - 13 Jan 1974) Shared 1st with Kuzmin, Szabo and Timman, ahead of Gligoric, Keene, Adorjan, Benko, Hartston, Basman, Suttles, Pytel, Miles, Garcia, Stean and Rellstab, with +5 -0 =10. ["Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973," pp. 181-182; Di Felice, "Chess Results 1971-1974" p.289 ]

    [Sources:

    <Books>

    Averbakh, Yuri "Centre-Stage and Behind the Scenes" Steve Giddins transl. New In Chess, 2011

    Cafferty, Bernard "Tal's 100 Best Games 1961-1973" Batsford, 1975

    Cafferty, Bernard and Taimanov, Mark "The Soviet Championships" Cadogen, 1998

    Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1951-1955" McFarland, 2010

    Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1956-1960" McFarland, 2010

    Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1961-1963" McFarland, 2013

    Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1964-1967" McFarland, 2013

    Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1968-1970" McFarland, 2013

    Di Felice, Gino "Chess Results 1971-1974" McFarland, 2014

    Földeák, Árpád "Chess Olympiads 1927-1968" Robert Ejury, Jeno Bochkor and Peter Clarke transl. Dover, 1969

    Golombek, Harry "4th Candidates' Tournament, 1959- Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade- September 7th - October 29th" Hardinge, Simpole 2009

    Khalifman, Alexander ed. "Mikhail Tal Games II" Chess Stars, 1995

    Tal, Mikhail "The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal" Cadogan, 1997

    Tal, Mikhail "Tal-Botvinnik 1960" 5th edition. Russell Enterprises, Inc. 2000

    Thomas, Hilary "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1936-1959" Batsford, 1980

    Thomas, Hilary "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1960-1966" Arco, 1979

    Thomas, Hilary "Complete Games of Mikhail Tal 1967-1973" Batsford, 1979

    Winter, Edward ed. ""World Chess Champions" (Pergamon Press, 1981)

    <Databases>

    365 Chess http://www.365chess.com/

    Alexander Khalifman et al, "Mikhail Tal - 8th World Champion" (PC-CD)

    OlimpBase http://www.olimpbase.org/

    RusBase http://al20102007.narod.ru/

    <Web pages>

    Tata Steel History- All-time Tournaments http://www.tatasteelchess.com/histo...

    Wikipedia http://www.wikipedia.org/

    ]

    143 games, 1949-1974

  4. -ER Fischer
    This is a collection split. The Lasker games are in their own collection now.

    A special tip o' the hat to chess historian Edward Winter. The entire chess world owes Mr. Winter a huge debt of gratitude for his steadfast historical research of our fascinating game and it's many stories. He is a great champion of the game too!

    “Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons.” ― Douglas MacArthur

    Jul-22-15
    SimplicityRichard wrote:

    My friend, I am afraid despite being a Fischer fan that I must disagree with you that Fischer was the best player in the world in 1960. Fischer was wiped out by Tal (0-4) in 1959. And Tal was World Champion in 1960 and 1961.

    You cannot lose 4-0 to another and claim to be the best in the world; there is no excuse to losing 4-0 to another player in serious games. That result is incredibly telling! #

    Just to add some facts; Gligoric beat Fischer 4 times, lost once and drew 6 times until 1962. When these two met in 1966 and thereafter, Fischer never lost to Gligoric. Fischer won or drew. Again until 1965, Reshevsky seemed to have been Fischer's match; but from 1966 onwards Fischer beat Reshevsky 5 times, losing no game and drawing thrice.

    Therefore, it appears that Fischer became the world's strongest player from around 1966. This is my view. #

    * Bobby Fischer photos in LIFE magazine: https://www.google.com/search?q=Bob...

    * BF's Simultaneous Tour: Game Collection: A Legend on the Road (I)

    * RJF change-up: Game Collection: Fischer doesn't play 1.e4

    * BF dismantles early computer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jA...

    * Here's a link to Fischer - Spassky, all years: search "Fischer vs Spassky"

    * Here's a link to Bobby Fischer playing White against the Sicilian: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    * Link to "My Sixty Memorable Games": Game Collection: My 60 Memorable Games/Fischer

    * Robert Fischer's Best Games by KingG (127 games, a ton of quotes): Game Collection: Robert Fischer's Best Games

    * Bobby Fischer Rediscovered/Andrew Soltis (97 games): Game Collection: Bobby Fischer Rediscovered (Andy Soltis)

    * 1992: Game Collection: Spassky-Fischer Match 1992

    * Chess Records: https://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/record...

    The Little Fish and the Fisher

    A little fish will grow,
    If life be spared, a great;
    But yet to let him go,
    And for his growing wait,
    May not be very wise,
    As It's not sure your bait
    Will catch him when of size.
    On a river bank, a fisher took
    A tiny troutling from his hook.
    Said he, "'Twill serve to count, at least,
    As the beginning of my feast;
    And so I'll put it with the rest."
    This little fish, thus caught,
    His clemency besought.
    "What will your honour do with me?
    I'm not a mouthful, as you see.
    Pray let me grow to be a trout,
    And then come here and fish me out.
    Some alderman, who likes things nice,
    Will buy me then at any price.
    But now, a hundred such you'll have to fish,
    To make a single good-for-nothing dish."
    "Well, well, be it so," replied the fisher,
    "My little fish, who play the preacher,
    The frying-pan must be your lot,
    Although, no doubt, you like it not:
    I fry the fry that can be got."

    In some things, men of sense
    Prefer the present to the future tense.

    Riddle: You answer me, although I never ask you questions. What am I?

    Answer: A telephone.

    Life is Too Short
    by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

    Life is too short for any vain regretting;
    Let dead delight bury its dead, I say,
    And let us go upon our way forgetting
    The joys, and sorrows, of each yesterday.
    Between the swift sun’s rising and its setting, We have no time for useless tears or fretting,
    Life is too short.

    Life is too short for any bitter feeling;
    Time is the best avenger if we wait,
    The years speed by, and on their wings bear healing, We have no room for anything like hate.
    This solemn truth the low mounds seem revealing
    That thick and fast about our feet are stealing, Life is too short.

    Life is too short for aught but high endeavor,— Too short for spite, but long enough for love.
    And love lives on forever and forever,
    It links the worlds that circle on above;
    ‘Tis God’s first law, the universe’s lever. In His vast realm the radiant souls sigh never
    “Life is too short.”


    460 games, 1827-2016

  5. -ER Folks
    Only a Pawn In Their Game
    Bob Dylan

    A bullet from the back of a bush took Medgar Evers' blood A finger fired the trigger to his name
    A handle hid out in the dark
    A hand set the spark
    Two eyes took the aim
    Behind a man's brain
    But he can't be blamed
    He's only a pawn in their game
    A South politician preaches to the poor white man "You got more than the blacks, don't complain
    You're better than them, you been born with white skin," they explain And the Negro's name
    Is used, it is plain
    For the politician's gain
    As he rises to fame
    And the poor white remains
    On the caboose of the train
    But it ain't him to blame
    He's only a pawn in their game
    The deputy sheriffs, the soldiers, the governors get paid And the marshals and cops get the same
    But the poor white man's used in the hands of them all like a tool He's taught in his school
    From the start by the rule
    That the laws are with him
    To protect his white skin
    To keep up his hate
    So he never thinks straight
    'Bout the shape that he's in
    But it ain't him to blame
    He's only a pawn in their game
    From the poverty shacks he looks from the cracks to the tracks And the hoof beats pound in his brain
    And he's taught how to walk in a pack
    Shoot in the back
    With his fist in a clinch
    To hang and to lynch
    To hide 'neath the hood
    To kill with no pain
    Like a dog on a chain
    He ain't got no name
    But it ain't him to blame
    He's only a pawn in their game
    Today Medgar Evers was buried from the bullet he caught They lowered him down as a king
    But when the shadowy sun sets on the one that fired the gun You'll see by his grave
    On the stone that remains
    Carved next to his name
    His epitaph plain
    "Only a pawn in their game"

    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

    64 games, 1620-2023

  6. -ER Lasker
    On the chessboard lies and hypocrisy do not survive long. The creative combination lays bare the presumption of a lie; the merciless fact, culmination in checkmate, contradicts the hypocrite. --- Emanuel Lasker

    This is a Fredthebear collection split. The Fischer games will be deleted as space is needed.

    Emanuel Lasker, Bobby Fischer: Tremendous world champions. Perhaps no other world champions have made a LASTING IMPACT on the chess world like these two have.

    I'd have to say that the strategic principles outlined by the first official world champion Wilhelm Steinitz would land him quite high on such a list having made a LASTING IMPACT. Garry Kasparov certainly leaps upward with his "My Great Predecessors" book series and mixed results against computers. Lasker would surely include Jose Capablanca, who had a brilliant but much shorter career and had to come out of retirement for financial reasons -- times were tough in the 1930s! Kasparov was heavily influenced by Alexander Alekhine. The evils of alcohol burden A.A. When sober, he could really tear it up.

    Listen closely at an American chess tournament, and the GM name you'll hear casually mentioned the most is easily Bobby Fischer. Perhaps "The Wizard of Riga" GM Mikhail Tal is close by in popularity. The pulverizing American champion Paul Morphy was not considered an official world champion, but no one was his equal world-wide. What chess player has not admired Paul Morphy's games, including Fischer himself?

    Fischer said Lasker was a coffee house player. He was mostly wrong. (Many disagree with Fischer's various opinions on many matters inside and outside of chess.) Both Fischer and Lasker were skilled, all-around players, great fighters. Lasker would play complicated moves, perhaps less than best but perplexing to the opponent, which Fischer disapproved of (having the benefit of several years of heavy analysis from the chess world).

    The one obvious area where Lasker clocked Fischer (and the entire chess world) was longevity. Not only was Lasker world champion for 27 years, he played at a very high level for many years later. Lasker went unbeaten and finished a half-point out of first (Flohr, Botvinnik) in the grueling nineteen-round 1935 Moscow tournament at the age of 66, ahead of Capablanca and Alekhine. Perhaps only Vice-Champion Korchnoi's career can compare for sustained excellence over a lifetime without waning due to age or alcoholism; both were smokers! It is fair to say that Lasker would be a GIANT in any era of play because of his ability to produce in difficult positions.

    A few of distant cousin Edward Lasker's games are here. Edward Lasker wrote a very instructive chess book called Modern Chess Strategy that influenced many future masters. (Lasker's Chess Manual was written by Emanuel Lasker and is also considered a classic for future masters.)

    A special tip o' the hat to chess historian Edward Winter. The entire chess world owes Mr. Winter a huge debt of gratitude for his steadfast historical research of our fascinating game and it's many stories. He is a great champion of the game too!

    * Nunn's Chess Course: Game Collection: Lasker JNCC

    * Secret Weapon: Game Collection: Lasker's Secret Weapon

    “Lead me, follow me, or get the hell out of my way.” ― George S. Patton Jr., Patton Principles

    * 1908 WC Match: Game Collection: Lasker vs Tarrasch WCM 1908

    * Link to Frank Marshall - Edward Lasker 1923 Match: Game Collection: Marshall -- Ed. Lasker 1923 match

    The Ears of the Hare

    Some beast with horns did gore
    The lion; and that sovereign dread,
    Resolved to suffer so no more,
    Straight banished from his realm, it's said,
    All sorts of beasts with horns –
    Rams, bulls, goats, stags, and unicorns.
    Such brutes all promptly fled.
    A hare, the shadow of his ears perceiving,
    Could hardly help believing
    That some vile spy for horns would take them,
    And food for accusation make them.
    "Adieu," said he, "my neighbour cricket;
    I take my foreign ticket.
    My ears, should I stay here,
    Will turn to horns, I fear;
    And were they shorter than a bird's,
    I fear the effect of words."
    "These horns!" the cricket answered; "why,
    God made them ears who can deny?"
    "Yes," said the coward, "still they'll make them horns, And horns, perhaps of unicorns!
    In vain shall I protest,
    With all the learning of the schools:
    My reasons they will send to rest
    In the Hospital of Fools.'

    This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill
    Fifteen percent concentrated power of will
    Five percent pleasure, fifty percent pain
    And a hundred percent reason to remember the name! ― Fort Minor

    Lasker's Secret Principle:

    "He (Emanuel Lasker) told me that this principle of controlling as many squares as possible was his guide at every stage of the game.

    He said "In the majority of cases it is probably best to have Knight and Bishop on squares of the same color, because then they control squares of opposite colors."

    ― Edward Lasker, Chess Secrets I Learned from the Masters

    There are distinct situations where a bishop is preferred (over a knight). For example, two bishops are better than two knights or one of each. Steven Mayer, the author of Bishop Versus Knight, contends, “A pair of bishops is usually considered to be worth six points, but common sense suggests that a pair of active bishops (that are very involved in the formation) must be accorded a value of almost nine under some circumstances.” This is especially true if the player can plant the bishops in the center of the board, as two bishops working in tandem can span up to 26 squares and have the capacity to touch every square.

    Bishops are also preferable to knights when queens have been exchanged because, Grandmaster Sergey Erenburg, who is ranked 11th in the U.S., explains, “[Bishops and rooks] complement each other, and when well-coordinated, act as a queen.” Conversely, a knight is the preferred minor piece when the queen survives until the late-middlegame or the endgame. Mayer explains, “The queen and knight are [able] to work together smoothly and create a greater number of threats than the queen and bishop.”

    When forced to say one is better than the other, most anoint the bishop. Mayer concludes, “I think it’s true that the bishops are better than the knights in a wider variety of positions than the knights are better than the bishops.”

    He continues, “Of course, I’m not sure this does us much good, as we only get to play one position at a time.”


    380 games, 1872-1968

  7. -ER Others
    From Baker to Farmer to Welder and so on. It is not the intent of this collection to include Lasker, Schlechter, Tartakower, Diemer, or Fischer, as they have their own collections. However, a few of their games will be included.

    Geller and Bisguier have their own collection now.

    * Glossary of Chess Terms: http://www.arkangles.com/kchess/glo...

    * GOTD Submission Page: Pun Submission Page

    * Brutal Attacking Chess collection: Game Collection: Brutal Attacking Chess

    “Theirs not to reason why,
    Theirs but to do and die”
    ― Lord Tennyson Alfred

    * Vienna 1903 KG games: Game Collection: Vienna 1903

    * Wonders and Curiosities: Game Collection: Wonders and Curiosities of Chess (Chernev)

    A toast to friendship:

    ‘Here’s to Tall Ships,
    Here’s to Small Ships,
    Here’s to all the Ships at Sea.
    But the best Ships are Friendships,
    Here’s to You and Me!’

    The Fox With His Tail Cut Off

    A cunning old fox, of plundering habits,
    Great crauncher of fowls, great catcher of rabbits, Whom none of his sort had caught in a nap,
    Was finally caught in somebody's trap.
    By luck he escaped, not wholly and hale,
    For the price of his luck was the loss of his tail. Escaped in this way, to save his disgrace,
    He thought to get others in similar case.
    One day that the foxes in council were met,
    "Why wear we," said he, "this cumbering weight,
    Which sweeps in the dirt wherever it goes?
    Pray tell me its use, if any one knows.
    If the council will take my advice,
    We shall dock off our tails in a trice."
    "Your advice may be good," said one on the ground; "But, before I reply, pray turn yourself round." Whereat such a shout from the council was heard, Poor bob-tail, confounded, could say not a word. To urge the reform would have wasted his breath. Long tails were the mode till the day of his death.

    Riddle: I am wet when drying. What am I?

    Answer: A towel.

    The Human Seasons
    by John Keats

    Four Seasons fill the measure of the year;
    There are four seasons in the mind of man:
    He has his lusty Spring, when fancy clear
    Takes in all beauty with an easy span:
    He has his Summer, when luxuriously
    Spring’s honied cud of youthful thought he loves To ruminate, and by such dreaming high
    Is nearest unto heaven: quiet coves
    His soul has in its Autumn, when his wings
    He furleth close; contented so to look
    On mists in idleness—to let fair things
    Pass by unheeded as a threshold brook.
    He has his Winter too of pale misfeature,
    Or else he would forego his mortal nature.

    Lichess has all the same basic offerings as Chess.com: a large community, many game types, tutorials, puzzles, and livestreams. The site has a simple appearance, and it seems built to get you where you want to go in as few clicks as possible. You can create an account, but if you’re not concerned with tracking your games and finding other players at your level, there’s no need to log in. Just fire up a new game, try some puzzles, or watch a chess streamer play three-minute games while listening to techno and chatting with the comments section.

    "Friend, you don't have to earn God's love or try harder. You're precious in His sight, covered by the priceless blood of Jesus, and indwelt by His Holy Spirit. Don't hide your heart or fear you're not good enough for Him to care for you. Accept His love, obey Him, and allow Him to keep you in His wonderful freedom." — Charles F. Stanley


    500 games, 1819-2020

  8. .30-30 Bullets
    Compiled by Fredthebear

    * One of Pandolfini's Best: Game Collection: Solitaire Chess by Bruce Pandolfini

    * Two Great Attackers: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

    * Golden Treasury of Chess (Wellmuth/Horowitz): Game Collection: 0

    * Chessmaster 2000 Classic Games:
    Game Collection: Chessmaster '86

    * GK: Game Collection: Kasparov - The Sicilian Sheveningen

    * How dumb is it? Game Collection: Diemer-Duhm Gambit

    “One more dance along the razor's edge finished. Almost dead yesterday, maybe dead tomorrow, but alive, gloriously alive, today.” ― Robert Jordan, Lord of Chaos

    * Beauty Prize: Game Collection: Les Prix de Beauté aux Echecs (I)

    * Brutal: Game Collection: Brutal Attacking Chess

    * Katar's Repertoire: Game Collection: An Opium Repertoire for White

    * Mr. Harvey's Puzzle Challenge: https://wtharvey.com/

    * Names and Places: Game Collection: Named Mates

    * C-Ks: Game Collection: Caro Kann Lines

    * Pretzels? Game Collection: Special Pretzel Collection

    * Sicilian Wingers: Game Collection: wing gambit victories

    * Ray Keene's favorite games: Game Collection: ray keene's favorite games

    * (Variety Pack) Compiled by Nova: Game Collection: KID games

    * JonathanJ's favorite games 4: Game Collection: JonathanJ's favorite games 4

    * jorundte's favorite games: Game Collection: jorundte's favorite games

    * elmubarak: my fav games: Game Collection: elmubarak: my fav games

    * assorted Good games Compiled by rbaglini: Game Collection: assorted Good games

    * LAST COLLECTION Compiled by Jaredfchess: Game Collection: LAST COLLECTION

    There are distinct situations where a bishop is preferred (over a knight). For example, two bishops are better than two knights or one of each. Steven Mayer, the author of Bishop Versus Knight, contends, “A pair of bishops is usually considered to be worth six points, but common sense suggests that a pair of active bishops (that are very involved in the formation) must be accorded a value of almost nine under some circumstances.” This is especially true if the player can plant the bishops in the center of the board, as two bishops working in tandem can span up to 26 squares and have the capacity to touch every square.

    Bishops are also preferable to knights when queens have been exchanged because, Grandmaster Sergey Erenburg, who is ranked 11th in the U.S., explains, “[Bishops and rooks] complement each other, and when well-coordinated, act as a queen.” Conversely, a knight is the preferred minor piece when the queen survives until the late-middlegame or the endgame. Mayer explains, “The queen and knight are [able] to work together smoothly and create a greater number of threats than the queen and bishop.”

    When forced to say one is better than the other, most anoint the bishop. Mayer concludes, “I think it’s true that the bishops are better than the knights in a wider variety of positions than the knights are better than the bishops.”

    He continues, “Of course, I’m not sure this does us much good, as we only get to play one position at a time.”

    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

    The Old Woman And Her Two Servants

    A beldam kept two spinning maids,
    Who plied so handily their trades,
    Those spinning sisters down below
    Were bunglers when compared with these.
    No care did this old woman know
    But giving tasks as she might please.
    No sooner did the god of day
    His glorious locks enkindle,
    Than both the wheels began to play,
    And from each whirling spindle
    Forth danced the thread right merrily,
    And back was coiled unceasingly.
    Soon as the dawn, I say, its tresses showed,
    A graceless cock most punctual crowed.
    The beldam roused, more graceless yet,
    In greasy petticoat bedight,
    Struck up her farthing light,
    And then forthwith the bed beset,
    Where deeply, blessedly did snore
    Those two maid-servants tired and poor.
    One oped an eye, an arm one stretched,
    And both their breath most sadly fetched,
    This threat concealing in the sigh –
    "That cursed cock shall surely die!"
    And so he did: they cut his throat,
    And put to sleep his rousing note.
    And yet this murder mended not
    The cruel hardship of their lot;
    For now the twain were scarce in bed
    Before they heard the summons dread.
    The beldam, full of apprehension
    Lest oversleep should cause detention,
    Ran like a goblin through her mansion.
    Thus often, when one thinks
    To clear himself from ill,
    His effort only sinks
    Him in the deeper still.
    The beldam, acting for the cock,
    Was Scylla for Charybdis" rock.

    Riddle: If there are four sheep, two dogs and one herds-men, how many feet are there?

    Answer: Two. Sheep have hooves; dogs have paws; only people have feet.

    PinkFaerie5 wrote:
    Leopard King Coronation

    bird of paradise flew in
    briefing the leopard king
    a candle was tossed

    but isn’t he disguised? a pheasant asked
    Yes, wearing a butterfly mask
    and one of your feathers

    the pheasant was pleased
    which is why I left, said the bird
    I thought he would be wearing my feather

    feelings are always being hurt
    at coronations of leopard kings
    this was no exception

    "Whatever you are doing in the game of life, give it all you've got." — Norman Vincent Peale

    "What you do today can improve all your tomorrows." — Ralph Marston


    295 games, 1620-2022

  9. .30-30 Winchester Carbine
    Fredthebear will fill this one up and edit it.

    * Vienna 1903 KG games: Game Collection: Vienna 1903

    * Two Great Attackers: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

    * One of Pandolfini's Best: Game Collection: Solitaire Chess by Bruce Pandolfini

    "There is no jewel in the world comparable to learning; no learning so excellent both for Prince and subject, as knowledge of laws; and no knowledge of any laws so necessary for all estates and for all causes, concerning goods, lands or life, as the common laws of England." -- Sir Edward Coke

    "Without integrity and honor, having everything means nothing." – Robin Sharma

    “I am no longer cursed by poverty because I took possession of my own mind, and that mind has yielded me every material thing I want, and much more than I need. But this power of mind is a universal one, available to the humblest person as it is to the greatest.” -- Andrew Carnegie

    "“Enthusiasm is one of the most powerful engines of success. When you do a thing, do it with all your might. Put your whole soul into it. Stamp it with your own personality. Be active, be energetic, be enthusiastic and faithful, and you will accomplish your object. Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” --Ralph Waldo Emerson

    “We sleep safely at night because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us.” ― Winston S. Churchill

    * Chessmaster 2000 Classic Games:
    Game Collection: Chessmaster '86

    * How dumb is it? Game Collection: Diemer-Duhm Gambit

    * Beauty Prize: Game Collection: Les Prix de Beauté aux Echecs (I)

    * Brutal Attacking Chess: Game Collection: Brutal Attacking Chess

    * Katar's Repertoire: Game Collection: An Opium Repertoire for White

    * Names and Places: Game Collection: Named Mates

    There are distinct situations where a bishop is preferred (over a knight). For example, two bishops are better than two knights or one of each. Steven Mayer, the author of Bishop Versus Knight, contends, “A pair of bishops is usually considered to be worth six points, but common sense suggests that a pair of active bishops (that are very involved in the formation) must be accorded a value of almost nine under some circumstances.” This is especially true if the player can plant the bishops in the center of the board, as two bishops working in tandem can span up to 26 squares and have the capacity to touch every square.

    Bishops are also preferable to knights when queens have been exchanged because, Grandmaster Sergey Erenburg, who is ranked 11th in the U.S., explains, “[Bishops and rooks] complement each other, and when well-coordinated, act as a queen.” Conversely, a knight is the preferred minor piece when the queen survives until the late-middlegame or the endgame. Mayer explains, “The queen and knight are [able] to work together smoothly and create a greater number of threats than the queen and bishop.”

    When forced to say one is better than the other, most anoint the bishop. Mayer concludes, “I think it’s true that the bishops are better than the knights in a wider variety of positions than the knights are better than the bishops.”

    He continues, “Of course, I’m not sure this does us much good, as we only get to play one position at a time.”

    The Satyr and the Traveller

    Within a savage forest grot
    A satyr and his chips
    Were taking down their porridge hot;
    Their cups were at their lips.

    You might have seen in mossy den,
    Himself, his wife, and brood;
    They had not tailor-clothes, like men,
    But appetites as good.

    In came a traveller, benighted,
    All hungry, cold, and wet,
    Who heard himself to eat invited
    With nothing like regret.

    He did not give his host the pain
    His asking to repeat;
    But first he blew with might and main
    To give his fingers heat.

    Then in his steaming porridge dish
    He delicately blew.
    The wondering satyr said, "I wish
    The use of both I knew."

    "Why, first, my blowing warms my hand,
    And then it cools my porridge."
    "Ah!" said his host, "then understand
    I cannot give you storage.
    "To sleep beneath one roof with you,
    I may not be so bold.
    Far be from me that mouth untrue
    Which blows both hot and cold."

    Riddle: What word is always pronounced wrong?

    Answer: Wrong!

    Jonathan Moya wrote:
    The King’s Rumination

    Befuddled with thought
    the king sought the oracle.

    “Count the sands,
    calculate the seas,”
    she said.

    Of the king’s future,
    she spoke nothing.

    Henceforth he
    contented only
    in his nightmares.

    Dover publishers have downsized their chess book offerings as decades have passed, but many of the all-time classics written in English descriptive notation remain available at affordable prices: https://doverpublications.ecomm-sea... Those who pitch their tent on the Rogoff page having no use for classic chess books can find adult coloring books at Dover publishers. It's a great, versatile publishing company!

    For club players, I would recommend "Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur" by Max Euwe and Walter Meiden (as well as Max Euwe's "The Logical Approach to Chess," "Strategy & Tactics in Chess," and "The Road to Chess Mastery" from other book dealers, likely used) before reading James Mason's "The Art of Chess" which is 340 pages! Mason does not spoon-feed the reader as much as Euwe does IMHO.

    Those readers demanding an algebraic notation offering from Dover Publishers would do well to buy any book by Tim Harding. Also, if memory serves correctly, there are two tournament books published in algebraic notation: Carlsbad International Chess Tournament 1929 by Aron Nimzovich, translated by Jim Marfia (30 games) and Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953 by David Bronstein (210 games).

    The sign says "free shipping" on orders over $25.00. Several chess offerings are available as e-books. You can bundle -- get both versions and save a bunch. For those wondering about adult coloring e-books, well... I'll have to get back to you on that one, the pace of new technology being what it is.


    338 games, 1790-2022

  10. .30-30 Winchester Lever-Action
    This is a Fredthebear collection split. It will fill up.

    "Chess is all about stored pattern recognition. You are asking your brain to spot a face in the crowd that it has not seen." -- Sally Simpson

    * Checkmate Patterns You Must Recognize Instantly: https://chessfox.com/checkmate-patt...

    * Charming: Game Collection: Charming Miniatures

    * Chessmaster 2000 Classic Games:
    Game Collection: Chessmaster '86

    * How dumb is it? Game Collection: Diemer-Duhm Gambit

    * KIDs: Game Collection: Kasparov on The King's Indian

    “The soldier is the Army. No army is better than its soldiers. The Soldier is also a citizen. In fact, the highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one’s country” ― George S. Patton Jr.

    * Chess w/the Masters: Game Collection: Beheim, M _Chess With the Masters_ NY: ARCO 1963

    * Greats: Game Collection: Chess Mastery

    * Forney's Collection: Game Collection: Brutal Attacking Chess

    * Spassky was cunning: Game Collection: Spassky's Best Games (Cafferty)

    * Brilliant (and mostly famous)! Game Collection: Brilliant Miniatures

    * Wonders and Curiosities: Game Collection: Wonders and Curiosities of Chess (Chernev)

    * Blowing Away the Castled King: Game Collection: Attack The King's Pocket

    * Sacs on f7/f2: Game Collection: Demolition of Pawn Structure: Sac on f7 (f2)

    The Horse and the Wolf

    A wolf, what time the thawing breeze
    Renews the life of plants and trees,
    And beasts go forth from winter lair
    To seek abroad their various fare, –
    A wolf, I say, about those days,
    In sharp look-out for means and ways,
    Espied a horse turned out to graze.
    His joy the reader may opine.
    "Once got," said he, "this game were fine;
    But if a sheep, it were sooner mine.
    I can't proceed my usual way;
    Some trick must now be put in play."
    This said,
    He came with measured tread,
    As if a healer of disease, –
    Some pupil of Hippocrates, –
    And told the horse, with learned verbs,
    He knew the power of roots and herbs, –
    Whatever grew about those borders, –
    And not at all to flatter
    Himself in such a matter,
    Could cure of all disorders.
    If he, Sir Horse, would not conceal
    The symptoms of his case,
    He, Doctor Wolf, would gratis heal;
    For that to feed in such a place,
    And run about untied,
    Was proof itself of some disease,
    As all the books decide.
    "I have, good doctor, if you please,"
    Replied the horse, "as I presume,
    Beneath my foot, an aposthume."
    "My son," replied the learned leech,
    "That part, as all our authors teach,
    Is strikingly susceptible
    Of ills which make acceptable
    What you may also have from me –
    The aid of skilful surgery;
    Which noble art, the fact is,
    For horses of the blood I practise."
    The fellow, with this talk sublime,
    Watched for a snap the fitting time.
    Meanwhile, suspicious of some trick,
    The wary patient nearer draws,
    And gives his doctor such a kick,
    As makes a chowder of his jaws.
    Exclaimed the wolf, in sorry plight,
    "I own those heels have served me right.
    I erred to quit my trade,
    As I will not in future;
    Me nature surely made
    For nothing but a butcher."

    This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill
    Fifteen percent concentrated power of will
    Five percent pleasure, fifty percent pain
    And a hundred percent reason to remember the name! ― Fort Minor

    Lasker's Secret Principle:

    "He (Emanuel Lasker) told me that this principle of controlling as many squares as possible was his guide at every stage of the game.

    He said "In the majority of cases it is probably best to have Knight and Bishop on squares of the same color, because then they control squares of opposite colors."

    ― Edward Lasker, Chess Secrets I Learned from the Masters

    Lichess has all the same basic offerings as Chess.com: a large community, many game types, tutorials, puzzles, and livestreams. The site has a simple appearance, and it seems built to get you where you want to go in as few clicks as possible. You can create an account, but if you’re not concerned with tracking your games and finding other players at your level, there’s no need to log in. Just fire up a new game, try some puzzles, or watch a chess streamer play three-minute games while listening to techno and chatting with the comments section.

    “Many have become chess masters, no one has become the master of chess.” ― Siegbert Tarrasch


    490 games, 1834-2022

  11. 021Club for ECO A, D, E
    * Game Collection: Checkmate: Checkmate Patterns This link has a good, concise collection of diagrammed checkmate patterns by name. The new reader may wish to consult it initially to the point of memorization.

    * Bc4 Minis: https://www.chessonly.com/bishop-op...

    * 1610 Again: Games Like Polerio vs Domenico, 1610

    * The original AA minis: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

    * More AA minis: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    * Rip 'em to shreds! https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/m...

    * Tactical Mix: Game Collection: mastering Tactical ideas by minev

    “A sacrifice is best refuted by accepting it.” ― Wilhelm Steinitz

    "Chess is all about stored pattern recognition. You are asking your brain to spot a face in the crowd that it has not seen." ― Sally Simpson

    “The day the soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help them or concluded that you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership.” ― Colin Powell

    * Some Miniatures of the Champs: Game Collection: Champions miniature champions

    * Wall's APCT Miniatures:
    http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/c...

    H.T. Bland. On page 207 of the December 1929 American Chess Bulletin he exalted the challenger in that year’s world championship match:

    Bravo ‘Bogol’, you’ve shown pluck.
    One and all we wish you luck.
    Gee, some thought you’d barged between
    Other players who’d have been
    Less likely straightaway to lose
    Just as friend Alekhine might choose;
    Undaunted, ‘Bogol’, you went in
    Believing you’d a chance to win.
    Or failing that, to make a fight,
    Which you are doing as we write.

    “Many have become chess masters, no one has become the master of chess.” ― Siegbert Tarrasch

    The Ploughman And His Sons

    The farmer's patient care and toil
    Are oftener wanting than the soil.

    A wealthy ploughman drawing near his end,
    Called in his sons apart from every friend,
    And said, "When of your sire bereft,
    The heritage our fathers left
    Guard well, nor sell a single field.
    A treasure in it is concealed:
    The place, precisely, I don't know,
    But industry will serve to show.
    The harvest past, Time's forelock take,
    And search with plough, and spade, and rake;
    Turn over every inch of sod,
    Nor leave unsearched a single clod."
    The father died. The sons – and not in vain – Turned over the soil, and over again;
    That year their acres bore
    More grain than ever before.
    Though hidden money found they none,
    Yet had their father wisely done,
    To show by such a measure,
    That toil itself is treasure.

    "Friend, you don't have to earn God's love or try harder. You're precious in His sight, covered by the priceless blood of Jesus, and indwelt by His Holy Spirit. Don't hide your heart or fear you're not good enough for Him to care for you. Accept His love, obey Him, and allow Him to keep you in His wonderful freedom." — Charles F. Stanley

    367 games, 1610-2022

  12. 021Club for ECO B, C
    * 1610 Again: Games Like Polerio vs Domenico, 1610

    * Vienna 1903 KG games: Game Collection: Vienna 1903

    * Book: Game Collection: Dismantling the Sicilian (Jesus de la Villa)

    * Freaky Fridays: https://allchessopenings.blogspot.c...

    * GK: Game Collection: Kasparov - The Sicilian Sheveningen

    “Chess first of all teaches you to be objective.” – Alexander Alekhine

    “Among a great many other things that chess teaches you is to control the initial excitement you feel when you see something that looks good. It trains you to think before grabbing and to think just as objectively when you’re in trouble.” -- Stanley Kubrick

    “Chess helps you to concentrate, improve your logic. It teaches you to play by the rules, take responsibility for your actions, how to problem solve in an uncertain environment.” – Garry Kasparov

    “Daring ideas are like chessmen moved forward. They may be beaten, but they may start a winning game.” – Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

    “To avoid losing a piece, many a person has lost the game.” – Savielly Tartakower

    “Battles are won by slaughter and maneuver. The greater the general, the more he contributes in maneuver, the less he demands in slaughter.” ― Winston S. Churchill

    * The original AA minis: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

    * More AA minis: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    * Brilliancies: Game Collection: brilliacies

    * C-K Examples: Game Collection: Caro Kann Lines

    * Chess Records: https://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/record...

    The Mountain In Labour

    A mountain was in travail pang;
    The country with her clamour rang.
    Out ran the people all, to see,
    Supposing that the birth would be
    A city, or at least a house.
    It was a mouse!

    In thinking of this fable,
    Of story feigned and false,
    But meaning veritable,
    My mind the image calls
    Of one who writes, "The war I sing
    Which Titans waged against the Thunder-king."
    As on the sounding verses ring,
    What will be brought to birth?
    Why, dearth.

    Riddle: What is a ghost's favorite fruit?

    Answer: BOO-BERRIES!

    The Blossom
    by William Blake

    Merry, merry sparrow!
    Under leaves so green
    A happy blossom
    Sees you, swift as arrow,
    Seek your cradle narrow,
    Near my bosom.
    Pretty, pretty robin!
    Under leaves so green
    A happy blossom
    Hears you sobbing, sobbing,
    Pretty, pretty robin,
    Near my bosom.

    Dover publishers have downsized their chess book offerings as decades have passed, but many of the all-time classics written in English descriptive notation remain available at affordable prices: https://doverpublications.ecomm-sea... Those who pitch their tent on the Rogoff page having no use for classic chess books can find adult coloring books at Dover publishers. It's a great, versatile publishing company!

    For club players, I would recommend "Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur" by Max Euwe and Walter Meiden (as well as Max Euwe's "The Logical Approach to Chess," "Strategy & Tactics in Chess," and "The Road to Chess Mastery" from other book dealers, likely used) before reading James Mason's "The Art of Chess" which is 340 pages! Mason does not spoon-feed the reader as much as Euwe does IMHO.

    Those readers demanding an algebraic notation offering from Dover Publishers would do well to buy any book by Tim Harding. Also, if memory serves correctly, there are two tournament books published in algebraic notation: Carlsbad International Chess Tournament 1929 by Aron Nimzovich, translated by Jim Marfia (30 games) and Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953 by David Bronstein (210 games).

    The sign says "free shipping" on orders over $25.00. Several chess offerings are available as e-books. You can bundle -- get both versions and save a bunch. For those wondering about adult coloring e-books, well... I'll have to get back to you on that one, the pace of new technology being what it is.


    457 games, 1475-2022

  13. 1 17 Moves or Less in Fredthebear's Lavatory
    Compiled by Fredthebear. Thank you Fred!

    “You can only get good at chess if you love the game.” ― Bobby Fischer

    * Glossary: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloss...

    * Here's a link to Morphy Miniatures:
    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    * Here's a link to the games of chess author Bill Wall; many are miniatures: Bill Wall

    * Rip 'em to shreds! https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/m...

    * 41 Chess Movies (List): https://www.chessonly.com/chess-mov...

    * How dumb is it? Game Collection: Diemer-Duhm Gambit

    * KIDs: Game Collection: Kasparov on The King's Indian

    “There are more adventures on a chessboard than on all the seas of the world.” – Pierre Mac Orlan

    “Soldiers can sometimes make decisions that are smarter than the orders they've been given.” ― Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game

    * Brilliancies: Game Collection: brilliacies

    * Masters of Masters: Game Collection: Chess Mastery

    "Whatever you are doing in the game of life, give it all you've got." — Norman Vincent Peale

    "What you do today can improve all your tomorrows." — Ralph Marston

    The Wishes

    Within the Great Mogul's domains there are
    Familiar sprites of much domestic use:
    They sweep the house, and take a tidy care
    Of equipage, nor garden work refuse;
    But, if you meddle with their toil,
    The whole, at once, you're sure to spoil.
    One, near the mighty Ganges flood,
    The garden of a burgher good
    Worked noiselessly and well;
    To master, mistress, garden, bore
    A love that time and toil outwore,
    And bound him like a spell.
    Did friendly zephyrs blow,
    The demon's pains to aid?
    (For so they do, it's said.)
    I own I do not know.
    But for himself he rested not,
    And richly blessed his master's lot.
    What marked his strength of love,
    He lived a fixture on the place,
    In spite of tendency to rove
    So natural to his race.
    But brother sprites conspiring
    With importunity untiring,
    So teased their goblin chief, that he,
    Of his caprice, or policy,
    Our sprite commanded to attend
    A house in Norway's farther end,
    Whose roof was snow-clad through the year,
    And sheltered human kind with deer.
    Before departing to his hosts
    Thus spake this best of busy ghosts:
    "To foreign parts I'm forced to go!
    For what sad fault I do not know; –
    But go I must; a month's delay,
    Or week's perhaps, and I'm away.
    Seize time; three wishes make at will;
    For three I'm able to fulfil –
    No more." Quick at their easy task,
    Abundance first these wishers ask –
    Abundance, with her stores unlocked –
    Barns, coffers, cellars, larder, stocked –
    Corn, cattle, wine, and money, –
    The overflow of milk and honey.
    But what to do with all this wealth!
    What inventories, cares, and worry!
    What wear of temper and of health!
    Both lived in constant, slavish hurry.
    Thieves took by plot, and lords by loan;
    The king by tax, the poor by tone.
    Thus felt the curses which
    Arise from being rich, –
    "Remove this affluence!" they pray;
    The poor are happier than they
    Whose riches make them slaves.
    "Go, treasures, to the winds and waves;
    Come, goddess of the quiet breast,
    Who sweet'nest toil with rest,
    Dear Mediocrity, return!"
    The prayer was granted as we learn.
    Two wishes thus expended,
    Had simply ended
    In bringing them exactly where,
    When they set out they were.
    So, usually, it fares
    With those who waste in such vain prayers
    The time required by their affairs.
    The goblin laughed, and so did they.
    However, before he went away,
    To profit by his offer kind,
    They asked for wisdom, wealth of mind, –
    A treasure void of care and sorrow –
    A treasure fearless of the morrow,
    Let who will steal, or beg, or borrow.

    This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill
    Fifteen percent concentrated power of will
    Five percent pleasure, fifty percent pain
    And a hundred percent reason to remember the name! ― Fort Minor

    Lasker's Secret Principle:

    "He (Emanuel Lasker) told me that this principle of controlling as many squares as possible was his guide at every stage of the game.

    He said "In the majority of cases it is probably best to have Knight and Bishop on squares of the same color, because then they control squares of opposite colors."

    ― Edward Lasker, Chess Secrets I Learned from the Masters

    Lichess has all the same basic offerings as Chess.com: a large community, many game types, tutorials, puzzles, and livestreams. The site has a simple appearance, and it seems built to get you where you want to go in as few clicks as possible. You can create an account, but if you’re not concerned with tracking your games and finding other players at your level, there’s no need to log in. Just fire up a new game, try some puzzles, or watch a chess streamer play three-minute games while listening to techno and chatting with the comments section.

    “Many have become chess masters, no one has become the master of chess.” – Siegbert Tarrasch


    499 games, 1620-2022

  14. 1 Attacks a2/a7, b2/b7& c2/c7 ECO C by Fredthebe
    “Let a man play chess, and tell him that every pawn is his friend; Let him think both bishops are holy. Let him remember happy days in the shadows of his castles. Let him love his queen. Watch him love his queen.” – Mark Lawrence (Prince of Thorn)

    “...It is a proud privilege to be a soldier – a good soldier … [with] discipline, self-respect, pride in his unit and his country, a high sense of duty and obligation to comrades and to his superiors, and a self confidence born of demonstrated ability.” ― George S. Patton Jr.

    * Glossary: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloss...

    * Oskar plays 1e4: Oskar Oglaza

    “Drawing is rather like playing chess. Your mind races ahead of time that you eventually make.” – David Hockney

    Fortune and the Boy

    Beside a well, uncurbed and deep,
    A schoolboy laid him down to sleep:
    (Such rogues can do so anywhere.)
    If some kind man had seen him there,
    He would have leaped as if distracted;
    But Fortune much more wisely acted;
    For, passing by, she softly waked the child,
    Thus whispering in accents mild:
    "I save your life, my little dear,
    And beg you not to venture here
    Again, for had you fallen in,
    I should have had to bear the sin;
    But I demand, in reason's name,
    If for your rashness I'm to blame?"
    With this the goddess went her way.
    I like her logic, I must say.
    There takes place nothing on this planet,
    But Fortune ends, whoever began it.
    In all adventures good or ill,
    We look to her to foot the bill.
    Has one a stupid, empty pate,
    That serves him never till too late,
    He clears himself by blaming Fate!

    “One more dance along the razor's edge finished. Almost dead yesterday, maybe dead tomorrow, but alive, gloriously alive, today.” ― Robert Jordan, Lord of Chaos

    “There are more adventures on a chessboard than on all the seas of the world.” – Pierre Mac Orlan

    Dover publishers have downsized their chess book offerings as decades have passed, but many of the all-time classics written in English descriptive notation remain available at affordable prices: https://doverpublications.ecomm-sea... Those who pitch their tent on the Rogoff page having no use for classic chess books can find adult coloring books at Dover publishers. It's a great, versatile publishing company!

    For club players, I would recommend "Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur" by Max Euwe and Walter Meiden (as well as Max Euwe's "The Logical Approach to Chess," "Strategy & Tactics in Chess," and "The Road to Chess Mastery" from other book dealers, likely used) before reading James Mason's "The Art of Chess" which is 340 pages! Mason does not spoon-feed the reader as much as Euwe does IMHO.

    Those readers demanding an algebraic notation offering from Dover Publishers would do well to buy any book by Tim Harding. Also, if memory serves correctly, there are two tournament books published in algebraic notation: Carlsbad International Chess Tournament 1929 by Aron Nimzovich, translated by Jim Marfia (30 games) and Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953 by David Bronstein (210 games).

    The sign says "free shipping" on orders over $25.00. Several chess offerings are available as e-books. You can bundle -- get both versions and save a bunch. For those wondering about adult coloring e-books, well... I'll have to get back to you on that one, the pace of new technology being what it is.

    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

    53 games, 1795-2022

  15. 1 Billy's favorite 1.e4 games plus
    Thank you billyhan!

    “Life is a gameboard. Time is your opponent. If you procrastinate, you will lose the game. Make a move to be victorious.” ― Napolean Hill

    “When your house is on fire, you cannot be bothered with the neighbors. Or, as we say in chess, if your King is under attack, do not worry about losing a pawn on the queenside.” ― Garry Kasparov

    “The consensus seemed to be that if really large numbers of men were sent to storm the mountain, then enough might survive the rocks to take the citadel. This is essentially the basis of all military thinking.” ― Terry Pratchett, Eric

    “Chess is a miniature version of life. To be successful, you need to be disciplined, assess resources, consider responsible choices, and adjust when circumstances change.” – Susan Polgar

    "We do not remember days, we remember moments." ― Cesare Pavese

    * If White knows the way: https://www.chessable.com/blog/mati...

    * C53s: Game Collection: rajat21's italian game

    * RL Minis: Game Collection: Ruy Lopez Miniatures

    * Del's: Game Collection: Del's hidden gems

    * Clean, Clear: https://chess-site.com/

    * GK: Game Collection: Kasparov - The Sicilian Sheveningen

    * Plenty to see: http://www.schackportalen.nu/Englis...

    "Each player must accept the cards life deals him or her: but once they are in hand, he or she alone must decide how to play the cards in order to win the game." ― Voltaire

    "What we think, we become." ― Buddha

    "Just play. Have fun. Enjoy the game." ― Michael Jordan

    "Man only plays when in the full meaning of the word he is a man, and he is only completely a man when he plays." ― Johann Friedrich Von Schiller

    "There is no passion to be found playing small – in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living." ― Nelson Mandela

    “Attack! Always Attack!” ― Adolf Anderssen

    “A sacrifice is best refuted by accepting it.” ― Wilhelm Steinitz

    “Chess is a matter of delicate judgment, knowing when to punch and how to duck.” ― Bobby Fischer

    “It’s a great huge game of chess that’s being played—all over the world—if this is the world at all, you know. Oh, what fun it is! How I wish I was one of them! I wouldn’t mind being a Pawn, if only I might join—though of course I should like to be a Queen, best.” — Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832–1898)

    Aristotle once asked "What is it about a thing that makes a thing what it is?"

    "To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born, is to remain always a child." ― Cicero

    The Doctors

    The selfsame patient put to test
    Two doctors, Fear-the-worst and Hope-the-best.
    The latter hoped; the former did maintain
    The man would take all medicine in vain.
    By different cures the patient was beset,
    But erelong cancelled nature's debt,
    While nursed
    As was prescribed by Fear-the-worst.
    But over the disease both triumphed still.
    Said one, "I well foresaw his death."
    "Yes," said the other, "but my pill
    Would certainly have saved his breath."


    173 games, 1620-2022

  16. 1 Bremen isn't in Yemen, it's in Germany
    “Chess is life in miniature. Chess is a struggle, chess battles.” — Garry Kasparov

    "After we have paid our dutiful respects to such frigid virtues as calculation, foresight, self-control and the like, we always come back to the thought that speculative attack is the lifeblood of chess." — Fred Reinfeld

    “Age brings wisdom to some men, and to others chess.” — Evan Esar

    "There is no jewel in the world comparable to learning; no learning so excellent both for Prince and subject, as knowledge of laws; and no knowledge of any laws so necessary for all estates and for all causes, concerning goods, lands or life, as the common laws of England." — Sir Edward Coke

    "Without integrity and honor, having everything means nothing." — Robin Sharma

    “I am no longer cursed by poverty because I took possession of my own mind, and that mind has yielded me every material thing I want, and much more than I need. But this power of mind is a universal one, available to the humblest person as it is to the greatest.” — Andrew Carnegie

    “Enthusiasm is one of the most powerful engines of success. When you do a thing, do it with all your might. Put your whole soul into it. Stamp it with your own personality. Be active, be energetic, be enthusiastic and faithful, and you will accomplish your object. Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

    “We sleep safely at night because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us.” ― Winston S. Churchill

    * Transfer these games: https://www.dailychess.com/chess/gr...

    Lev Polugaevsky vs Oscar Panno
    ½-½
    33 1971
    Mar del Plata

    Milan Vukic vs Viktor Kortschnoj
    0-1
    9 1971
    URS-JUG

    Roman Hernandez vs Fridrik Olafsson
    ½-½
    28 1975
    Tallinn

    Margeir Petursson vs Viswanathan Anand
    0-1
    62 2000
    Chess@iceland rapidplay Semifinal

    Lev Psakhis vs Mark Tseitlin
    ½-½
    23 1990
    Tel Aviv op

    Lev Psakhis vs Torben Myrvold
    1-0
    39 1994
    Peer Gynt

    Anatoly Karpov vs Vladimir I Karasev
    ½-½
    42 1971
    URS-ch39

    Lajos Portisch vs Robert Huebner
    1-0
    50 1983
    Tilburg

    Lajos Portisch vs Henrique Mecking
    ½-½
    63 1973
    Petropolis Interzonal

    Lajos Portisch vs Hans Ree
    1-0
    39 1969
    Hoogovens

    Lajos Portisch vs Jan Timman
    ½-½
    21 1981
    Amsterdam

    Ljubomir Ljubojevic vs Vassily Ivanchuk
    1-0
    35 1992
    Roquebrune

    Robert Huebner vs David Bronstein
    ½-½
    12 1975
    Teeside

    Robert Huebner vs Larry Christiansen
    ½-½
    35 1992
    Munich

    Robert Huebner vs Borje Jansson
    1-0
    41 1972
    Skopje ol (Men) fin-A

    Robert Huebner vs Mato Damjanovic
    ½-½
    23 1974
    Houston

    Borislav Ivkov vs Fridrik Olafsson
    ½-½
    20 1971
    Hoogovens

    Borislav Ivkov vs Wolfgang Uhlmann
    1-0
    43 1972
    Skopje ol (Men) fin-A

    Lubomir Kavalek vs Jan Timman
    ½-½
    16 1979
    Tilburg

    Viktor Kortschnoj vs Miroslav Filip
    1-0
    47 1962
    Candidats Tournament

    Viktor Kortschnoj vs Mark Taimanov
    1-0
    53 1973
    Leningrad Interzonal

    Viktor Kortschnoj vs Gennady Kuzmin
    ½-½
    39 1973
    URS-ch41

    Viktor Kortschnoj vs Henrique Mecking
    ½-½
    81 1974
    Candidats qf4

    Viktor Kortschnoj vs Jan Timman
    ½-½
    21 1995
    Madrid

    Vlastimil Hort vs Roberto Cosulich
    ½-½
    20 1971
    Venice

    Vlastimil Hort vs Carel Benjamin Van den Berg
    1-0
    30 1971
    Hoogovens

    Vlastimil Hort vs Viktor Kortschnoj
    ½-½
    31 1975
    Moscow

    Vlastimil Hort vs Gyula Sax
    0-1
    69 1984
    Lugano op

    Vlastimil Hort vs Peter Gruen
    1-0
    47 1987
    Bundesliga 8687

    Gata Kamsky vs Peter Svidler
    ½-½
    48 2007
    World Cup

    * Opening Explorer: Opening Explorer

    * Giannis says: https://www.suffernchessclub.com/co...

    * A11s: Game Collection: A11 (White Wins): English Opening

    * Briefly for White: Game Collection: Repertoire for White

    * Brilliant (and mostly famous games)!! Game Collection: Brilliant Miniatures

    * Chessmaster 2000 Classic Games: Game Collection: Chessmaster '86

    * Forney's Collection: Game Collection: Brutal Attacking Chess

    * Random Zs: Game Collection: ZHVNE

    * Secrets of Combination from naku1964: Game Collection: Secrets of the Russian Chess Masters Volume II

    * Smyslov's Best: Game Collection: Smyslov's Best Games of chess 1935-1957

    * Karpov's book: Game Collection: Karpov Right Plan

    * Garry gets 'em quick: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    * Names and Places: Game Collection: Named Mates

    * Masterful: Game Collection: FRENCH DEFENSE MASTERPIECES

    * Rip 'em to shreds! https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/m...

    * Spassky had a universal style: Game Collection: Spassky's Best Games (Cafferty)

    “Chess is an infinitely complex game, which one can play in infinitely numerous & varied ways.” ― Vladimir Kramnik

    A Windsong by Ray Paquette (1984):

    As you set sail for new horizons
    May a brisk fair wind be with you
    May your journey provide that mixture of
    Joy, contentment, love and excitement
    That gives rise to zestful anticipation
    Of new adventures together.
    May you cheerfully weather
    the unavoidable storms together
    And steer as clear of all obstacles
    As the currents allow
    May God Bless and keep you
    Bon Voyage

    This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill
    Fifteen percent concentrated power of will
    Five percent pleasure, fifty percent pain
    And a hundred percent reason to remember the name! ― Fort Minor

    Lasker's Secret Principle:

    "He (Emanuel Lasker) told me that this principle of controlling as many squares as possible was his guide at every stage of the game.

    He said "In the majority of cases it is probably best to have Knight and Bishop on squares of the same color, because then they control squares of opposite colors."

    ― Edward Lasker, Chess Secrets I Learned from the Masters

    The Ass And His Masters

    A gardener's ass complained to Destiny
    Of being made to rise before the dawn.
    "The cocks their matins have not sung," said he, vere I am up and gone.
    And all for what? To market herbs, it seems.
    Fine cause, indeed, to interrupt my dreams!"
    Fate, moved by such a prayer,
    Sent him a currier's load to bear,
    Whose hides so heavy and ill-scented were,
    They almost choked the foolish beast.
    "I wish me with my former lord," he said;
    "For then, whenever he turned his head,
    If on the watch, I caught
    A cabbage-leaf, which cost me nothing.
    But, in this horrid place, I find
    No chance or windfall of the kind:
    Or if, indeed, I do,
    The cruel blows I rue."
    Anon it came to pass
    He was a collier's ass.
    Still more complaint. "What now?" said Fate,
    Quite out of patience.
    "If on this jackass I must wait,
    What will become of kings and nations?
    Has none but he anything here to tease him?
    Have I no business but to please him?"
    And Fate had cause; – for all are so.
    Unsatisfied while here below
    Our present lot is aye the worst.
    Our foolish prayers the skies infest.
    Were Jove to grant all we request,
    The din renewed, his head would burst.

    “One more dance along the razor's edge finished. Almost dead yesterday, maybe dead tomorrow, but alive, gloriously alive, today.” ― Robert Jordan, Lord of Chaos

    Jupiter and the Farmer

    Of yore, a farm had Jupiter to rent;
    To advertise it, Mercury was sent.
    The farmers, far and near,
    Flocked round, the terms to hear;
    And, calling to their aid
    The various tricks of trade,
    One said It was rash a farm to hire
    Which would so much expense require;
    Another, that, do what you would,
    The farm would still be far from good.
    While thus, in market style, its faults were told, One of the crowd, less wise than bold, Would give so much, on this condition,
    That Jove would yield him altogether
    The choice and making of his weather, –
    That, instantly on his decision,
    His various crops should feel the power
    Of heat or cold, of sun or shower.

    Jove yields. The bargain closed, our man
    Rains, blows, and takes the care
    Of all the changes of the air,
    On his peculiar, private plan.
    His nearest neighbours felt it not,
    And all the better was their lot.
    Their year was good, by grace divine;
    The grain was rich, and full the vine.
    The renter, failing altogether,
    The next year made quite different weather;
    And yet the fruit of all his labours
    Was far inferior to his neighbours'.
    What better could he do? To Heaven
    He owns at last his want of sense,
    And so is graciously forgiven.
    Hence we conclude that Providence
    Knows better what we need
    Than we ourselves, indeed.

    "Many have become chess masters, no one has become the master of chess." ― Siegbert Tarrasch

    Lichess has all the same basic offerings as Chess.com: a large community, many game types, tutorials, puzzles, and livestreams. The site has a simple appearance, and it seems built to get you where you want to go in as few clicks as possible. You can create an account, but if you’re not concerned with tracking your games and finding other players at your level, there’s no need to log in. Just fire up a new game, try some puzzles, or watch a chess streamer play three-minute games while listening to techno and chatting with the comments section.


    50 games, 1903-2012

  17. 1 C40 Latvian Gambit I
    Compiled by Listen50s.

    Main Line 3.Ne5 Qf6 5.Nf3

    Leonhardt Variation 3.Ne5 Qf6 4.Nc4

    Bronstein Attack 3.Ne5 Qf6 5.Nc4 6.Be2

    Nimzowitsch Attack 3.Ne5 Qf6 6.Ne3

    "The harder you fall, the heavier your heart; the heavier your heart, the stronger you climb; the stronger you climb, the higher your pedestal." — Criss Jami

    * C21-C22 miniatures: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

    * Danish Gambits: Game Collection: Danish Gambit Games 1-0

    * Javed's way: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...

    * King's Gambit start-up: Game Collection: Batsford's MCO 14 King's Gambit

    * King Bishop's Gambit: Game Collection: rajat21's kings gambit

    * KG Video: Game Collection: Foxy Openings - King's Gambit

    * GM Gallagher is an author:
    Game Collection: 0

    * Old P-K4 Miniatures: Game Collection: Games for Classes

    * Ponziani Games: Game Collection: PONZIANI OPENING

    * Aggressive Gambits: https://thechessworld.com/articles/...

    * Volo plays the KP faithfully: Volodymyr Onyshchuk

    * 20 Various Italian Games: Game Collection: Italian Game

    * C53s: Game Collection: rajat21's italian game

    * RL Minis: Game Collection: Ruy Lopez Miniatures

    * Del's: Game Collection: Del's hidden gems

    * 21st Century: Game Collection: 21st Century Masterpieces - First decade (2000)

    * GK: Game Collection: Kasparov - The Sicilian Sheveningen

    * TIP: Click on the e8 square to see a computer engine analysis of the position.

    * Hans On French: Game Collection: French Defense

    * Alapins: Game Collection: Alapin

    * Chess Records: https://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/record...

    "One of the supreme paradoxes of baseball, and all sports, is that the harder you try to throw a pitch or hit a ball or accomplish something, the smaller your chances are for success. You get the best results not when you apply superhuman effort but when you let the game flow organically and allow yourself to be fully present. You'll often hear scouts say of a great prospect, "The game comes slow to him." It means the prospect is skilled and poised enough to let the game unfold in its own time, paying no attention to the angst or urgency or doubt, funneling all awareness to the athletic task at hand." — R.A. Dickey

    The Horse and the Wolf

    A wolf, what time the thawing breeze
    Renews the life of plants and trees,
    And beasts go forth from winter lair
    To seek abroad their various fare, –
    A wolf, I say, about those days,
    In sharp look-out for means and ways,
    Espied a horse turned out to graze.
    His joy the reader may opine.
    "Once got," said he, "this game were fine;
    But if a sheep, it were sooner mine.
    I can't proceed my usual way;
    Some trick must now be put in play."
    This said,
    He came with measured tread,
    As if a healer of disease, –
    Some pupil of Hippocrates, –
    And told the horse, with learned verbs,
    He knew the power of roots and herbs, –
    Whatever grew about those borders, –
    And not at all to flatter
    Himself in such a matter,
    Could cure of all disorders.
    If he, Sir Horse, would not conceal
    The symptoms of his case,
    He, Doctor Wolf, would gratis heal;
    For that to feed in such a place,
    And run about untied,
    Was proof itself of some disease,
    As all the books decide.
    "I have, good doctor, if you please,"
    Replied the horse, "as I presume,
    Beneath my foot, an aposthume."
    "My son," replied the learned leech,
    "That part, as all our authors teach,
    Is strikingly susceptible
    Of ills which make acceptable
    What you may also have from me –
    The aid of skilful surgery;
    Which noble art, the fact is,
    For horses of the blood I practise."
    The fellow, with this talk sublime,
    Watched for a snap the fitting time.
    Meanwhile, suspicious of some trick,
    The wary patient nearer draws,
    And gives his doctor such a kick,
    As makes a chowder of his jaws.
    Exclaimed the wolf, in sorry plight,
    "I own those heels have served me right.
    I erred to quit my trade,
    As I will not in future;
    Me nature surely made
    For nothing but a butcher."

    Amanda Kay wrote:

    Checkmate
    You were my knight
    Shining armor
    Chess board was our home
    Queen's fondness you garnered
    A kiss sweeter than honeycomb

    "Friend, you don't have to earn God's love or try harder. You're precious in His sight, covered by the priceless blood of Jesus, and indwelt by His Holy Spirit. Don't hide your heart or fear you're not good enough for Him to care for you. Accept His love, obey Him, and allow Him to keep you in His wonderful freedom." — Charles F. Stanley

    There are distinct situations where a bishop is preferred (over a knight). For example, two bishops are better than two knights or one of each. Steven Mayer, the author of Bishop Versus Knight, contends, “A pair of bishops is usually considered to be worth six points, but common sense suggests that a pair of active bishops (that are very involved in the formation) must be accorded a value of almost nine under some circumstances.” This is especially true if the player can plant the bishops in the center of the board, as two bishops working in tandem can span up to 26 squares and have the capacity to touch every square.

    Bishops are also preferable to knights when queens have been exchanged because, Grandmaster Sergey Erenburg, who is ranked 11th in the U.S., explains, “[Bishops and rooks] complement each other, and when well-coordinated, act as a queen.” Conversely, a knight is the preferred minor piece when the queen survives until the late-middlegame or the endgame. Mayer explains, “The queen and knight are [able] to work together smoothly and create a greater number of threats than the queen and bishop.”

    When forced to say one is better than the other, most anoint the bishop. Mayer concludes, “I think it’s true that the bishops are better than the knights in a wider variety of positions than the knights are better than the bishops.”

    He continues, “Of course, I’m not sure this does us much good, as we only get to play one position at a time.”

    “Chess is an infinitely complex game, which one can play in infinitely numerous & varied ways.” ― Vladimir Kramnik


    40 games, 1841-2019

  18. 1 dcruggeroli's dcfianchettoes
    It cooks up like soup, slow and steady.

    Thank you dcruggeroli!

    “It’s a great huge game of chess that’s being played—all over the world—if this is the world at all, you know. Oh, what fun it is! How I wish I was one of them! I wouldn’t mind being a Pawn, if only I might join—though of course I should like to be a Queen, best.” — Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832–1898)

    “Chess is a simple game, but it is that very simplicity that makes the player’s personalities come out.” — Gamou Jirou

    “-You have no respect for excessive authority or obsolete traditions. You're dangerous and depraved, and you ought to be taken outside and shot!” ― Joseph Heller, Catch-22

    “The day the soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help them or concluded that you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership.” ― Colin Powell

    “As proved by evidence, it (chess) is more lasting in its being and presence than all books and achievements; the only game that belongs to all people and all ages; of which none knows the divinity that bestowed it on the world, to slay boredom, to sharpen the senses, to exhilarate the spirit.” — Stefan Zweig

    "Chess is all about stored pattern recognition. You are asking your brain to spot a face in the crowd that it has not seen." ― Sally Simpson

    * Checkmate Patterns You Must Recognize Instantly: https://chessfox.com/checkmate-patt...

    * Charming: Game Collection: Charming Miniatures

    * Chessmaster 2000 Classic Games:
    Game Collection: Chessmaster '86

    * Here's a link to the games of chess author Bill Wall; many are miniatures: Bill Wall

    * Rip 'em to shreds! https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/m...

    * How dumb is it? Game Collection: Diemer-Duhm Gambit

    * KIDs: Game Collection: Kasparov on The King's Indian

    * Good Historical Links: https://www.saund.co.uk/britbase/in...

    * Internet tracking: https://www.studysmarter.us/magazin...

    poem by B.H. Wood, entitled ‘The Drowser’:

    Ah, reverie! Ten thousand heads I see
    Bent over chess-boards, an infinity
    Of minds engaged in battle, fiendishly,
    Keenly, or calmly, as the case may be:
    World-wide, the neophyte, the veteran,
    The studious problemist, the fairy fan ...
    “What’s that? – I’m nearly sending you to sleep? Sorry! – but this position’s rather deep.”

    Source: Chess Amateur, September 1929, page 268.

    The Ass and the Little Dog

    One's native talent from its course
    Cannot be turned aside by force;
    But poorly apes the country clown
    The polished manners of the town.
    Their Maker chooses but a few
    With power of pleasing to imbue;
    Where wisely leave it we, the mass,
    Unlike a certain fabled ass,
    That thought to gain his master's blessing
    By jumping on him and caressing.
    "What!" said the donkey in his heart;
    "Ought it to be that puppy's part
    To lead his useless life
    In full companionship
    With master and his wife,
    While I must bear the whip?
    What does the cur a kiss to draw?
    Forsooth, he only gives his paw!
    If that is all there needs to please,
    I'll do the thing myself, with ease."
    Possessed with this bright notion, –
    His master sitting on his chair,
    At leisure in the open air, –
    He ambled up, with awkward motion,
    And put his talents to the proof;
    Upraised his bruised and battered hoof,
    And, with an amiable mien,
    His master patted on the chin,
    The action gracing with a word –
    The fondest bray that ever was heard!
    O, such caressing was there ever?
    Or melody with such a quaver?
    "Ho! Martin! here! a club, a club bring!"
    Out cried the master, sore offended.
    So Martin gave the ass a drubbing, –
    And so the comedy was ended.

    “Many have become chess masters, no one has become the master of chess.” — Siegbert Tarrasch

    The Hen With The Golden Eggs

    How avarice loses all,
    By striving all to gain,
    I need no witness call
    But him whose thrifty hen,
    As by the fable we are told,
    Laid every day an egg of gold.
    "She has a treasure in her body,"
    Bethinks the avaricious noddy.
    He kills and opens – vexed to find
    All things like hens of common kind.
    Thus spoiled the source of all his riches,
    To misers he a lesson teaches.
    In these last changes of the moon,
    How often does one see
    Men made as poor as he
    By force of getting rich too soon!

    "Friend, you don't have to earn God's love or try harder. You're precious in His sight, covered by the priceless blood of Jesus, and indwelt by His Holy Spirit. Don't hide your heart or fear you're not good enough for Him to care for you. Accept His love, obey Him, and allow Him to keep you in His wonderful freedom." — Charles F. Stanley

    There are distinct situations where a bishop is preferred (over a knight). For example, two bishops are better than two knights or one of each. Steven Mayer, the author of Bishop Versus Knight, contends, “A pair of bishops is usually considered to be worth six points, but common sense suggests that a pair of active bishops (that are very involved in the formation) must be accorded a value of almost nine under some circumstances.” This is especially true if the player can plant the bishops in the center of the board, as two bishops working in tandem can span up to 26 squares and have the capacity to touch every square.

    Bishops are also preferable to knights when queens have been exchanged because, Grandmaster Sergey Erenburg, who is ranked 11th in the U.S., explains, “[Bishops and rooks] complement each other, and when well-coordinated, act as a queen.” Conversely, a knight is the preferred minor piece when the queen survives until the late-middlegame or the endgame. Mayer explains, “The queen and knight are [able] to work together smoothly and create a greater number of threats than the queen and bishop.”

    When forced to say one is better than the other, most anoint the bishop. Mayer concludes, “I think it’s true that the bishops are better than the knights in a wider variety of positions than the knights are better than the bishops.”

    He continues, “Of course, I’m not sure this does us much good, as we only get to play one position at a time.”

    "To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born, is to remain always a child." — Cicero


    25 games, 1946-2018

  19. 1 French Exchange
    * Black Defends: Game Collection: Opening repertoire black

    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

    22 games, 1845-2022

  20. 1 French- maxims
    Compiled by inlimbo777

    "There is no jewel in the world comparable to learning; no learning so excellent both for Prince and subject, as knowledge of laws; and no knowledge of any laws so necessary for all estates and for all causes, concerning goods, lands or life, as the common laws of England." ― Sir Edward Coke

    "Without integrity and honor, having everything means nothing." ― Robin Sharma

    “I am no longer cursed by poverty because I took possession of my own mind, and that mind has yielded me every material thing I want, and much more than I need. But this power of mind is a universal one, available to the humblest person as it is to the greatest.” ― Andrew Carnegie

    “Enthusiasm is one of the most powerful engines of success. When you do a thing, do it with all your might. Put your whole soul into it. Stamp it with your own personality. Be active, be energetic, be enthusiastic and faithful, and you will accomplish your object. Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

    “We sleep safely at night because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us.” ― Winston S. Churchill

    * Starting Out: French Defense: Game Collection: Starting out : The French

    * Alekhine's French Def: https://www.chessgames.com/perl/che...

    * A few KIAs: Game Collection: Opening Ideas

    * Advance French: Game Collection: Attacking with the French

    * Black Defends: Game Collection: Opening repertoire black

    * Masterful: Game Collection: FRENCH DEFENSE MASTERPIECES

    “Chess is an infinitely complex game, which one can play in infinitely numerous & varied ways.” ― Vladimir Kramnik

    Endgame Maxims
    Collector unknown

    There is quite a difference between endgame technique and endgame strategy. In order to develop an endgame strategy I will gather all maxims I can find, put them in a blender and distill a strategy out of it. I will try to avoid double maxims around the same topic: what good is for you to strive for is automatically bad for the opponent and has to be avoided by him and vice versa.

    Endgames of the 0-st order: pawn endings.
    If one pawn can hold two that is favourable.
    If you have two pawns on adjacent files, push the one on the free file first. To prevent the previous maxim. Have your pawn majority on the side where it is not opposed by the enemy king. Advanced pawns can lead to a favourable break because they are closer to promotion. Create a passer whenever it is safe.
    Create an outside passed pawn as a decoy to help your king to penetrate in the enemy position on the other wing. Endgames of the 1st order: 1 piece+pawns vs 1 piece+pawns

    The light pieces.
    If you have a bishop, put your pawns on the opposite color. No matter what your opponent's piece is. The idea is twofold: it makes your bishop active, and when the opponent pushes his pawns till they are blocked against yours, they automatically become a potential target for your bishop since they are on the same color. If you have bishops of the same color the previous maxim will make his bishop bad. If you have bishops of opposite color, and you try to win, put your pawns on the opposite color as your bishop. If you are defending, put them on the same color as your bishop. A bishop is strong in an open position.
    A bishop is strong when working on two wings at the same time. Especially important with bishops of opposite colors. If you have a knight, a knight is strong in closed (blocked) positions. A knight is strong with all pawns on one wing.
    With knight vs knight, the penetration of the king is the main motif, plus the outside passer. A knight needs outposts.
    B vs N deprive the knight from outposts, then dominate the knight. Rook vs rook.
    Before anything else you must be able to play the Lucena and the Philidor position and the 3rd rank defense. Make your rook active at all costs.
    Let your king help.
    Try to bind the enemy rook to the defense.
    Defend a passer from behind, i.e. the first rank, to leave the promotion square free. Two joined passers are often winning, so you can sacrifice a few pawns for that. A condition to play for the win is that there are pawns on both wings, which make it very difficult for the defending king to choose where to go. If the pawns are on one wing you have only a chance when you can cut of the enemy king. Rook vs bishop or knight
    Keep the pawns on the board.
    Attack the enemy pawns from behind (=7th or 8th rank). Create weakness which you can attack with both your rook and king. Endgames of the second order: 2 pieces+pawns vs 2 pieces+pawns

    General.
    The attacker decides when to trade pieces for an endgame of the first order, since the defender doesn't want to change pieces. Two bishops vs two bishops.
    After the trade you will have two bishops of the same color. So the pawn structure dictates which bishop to trade. You must be left with the good bishop. Your opponent's bishop will automatically be bad. Two bishops vs bishop and knight.
    A Russian proverb says: "The advantage of the bishop pair is that you can trade it off." Beware that you keep the good bishop and avoid bishops of opposite color when the underlying pawn ending is better for you. Two bishops vs two knights.
    Open up the position. Create two wings. Trade off your bad bishop. Pawns at the rim are difficult to stop by a knight. Bishop+knight vs bishop+knight.
    Bishop+knight vs 2 knights.
    In general a good bishop is better than a knight. The only reason to prefer a knight is when your opponent has the bad bishop and the pawns are on one wing. 2 knights vs 2 knights.
    Trade of a set of knights when the underlying pawn ending is better. Remember that the remain ending with knight vs knight is about penetrating with the king and the outside passer. 2 rooks vs 2 rooks.
    Trade off a set of rooks when you have winning chances. What to do with your King?
    Head for the center, from where the king can intervene where needed. Walk to your passed pawns.
    Walk to pawns that are susceptible of being attacked. Free a piece that is bound to defence.
    Penetrate the enemy positions when you are faster than the counterattack of your opponent.

    General ideas.
    When you don't know what to do, try to inflict your opponent with an extra weakness. When you are worse, don't play for the win.
    Only accept a draw or offer a draw when you are worse. Otherwise you will never learn to play an endgame. Worse can mean behind in time.

    When to trade pieces and pawns?
    When behind in material, head for a drawish endgame (bishop of opposite color or rook vs rook with pawns on one wing) When behind in material, trade pawns, not pieces. In the end you can sac your last piece for his last pawn, when you leave him with insufficient mating potential.

    Middlegame techniques to get a good endgame.
    Minority attack. You attack with 2 pawns 3 hostile pawns. After trading off you leave your opponent with an isolani that you can conquer. Inflict damage to the opponent's pawn structure: double pawn, isolani, backward pawn, many pawn islands. Create an (outside) passed pawn.
    No open files leads to a rook ending.

    One of my early instructional books that I probably gained the most from was Ludek Pachman's classic, Modern Chess Strategy. In the book's section on passed Pawns, he wrote that two united passed Pawns are a dangerous weapon, but the possessor of such Pawns must make sure that they cannot be blockaded and that, as a rule, such Pawns should advance together.

    Endgame Practice
    While on the website Chess Videos TV yesterday I noticed they have several “Chess Tools” like diagram generators, endgame simulator, visualization training, etc. that are worth checking out. For example, under the endgame simulator they have linked to the Crafty engine so you can play versus the computer in different situations right from your browser.

    * Crafty Endgame Trainer: https://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-...

    Monday, November 28, 2022
    George Armstrong Custer, A Contemptible Person

    While watching the basketball game between West Virginia and Florida on Sunday night (11/17) I was annoyed by the announcers...they were worthless; for the most part they engaged in idle chit-chat, told anecdotes, tossed out stupid "quizzes" and told us what was happening in other games in the tournament all while virtually ignoring what was going on in the West Virginia vs. Florida game. Nevertheless, they were not nearly as bad as the two asshat announcers Chick Hernandez and Chris Walker, who decided to poke fun at Wichita State basketball player Isaiah Poor Bear-Chandler because of his name. His name comes from his being half Native American and it is a tribute to his heritage. He is a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe and he grew up on a reservation in Pine Ridge, South Dakota before moving to Omaha, Nebraska where he attended high school. Poor Bear-Chandler reminded me of the trip I took many years ago when I drove to Yellowstone National Park which is mostly in Wyoming. On the way I passed through some of the most beautiful and interesting parts of the country I have ever seen...the Black Hills and the Badlands in South Dakota. While on the trip I visited the Little Big Horn battlefield in Montana which is where the US Army's 7th Cavalry and the Lakotas and Cheyennes met in one of the Native American's last armed efforts to preserve their way of life. On June 25 and 26 of 1876, 263 soldiers, including Lieutenant Colonel (NOT General) George A. Custer and his troops died fighting several thousand Lakota and Cheyenne warriors. Somehow I think the memorial is to the wrong person...it should have been to the Native Americans, or Indians as they were called in my day. It wasn't far from Yellowstone where Custer made his ignoble charge down Deep Ravine Trail where Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Gall were waiting with the largest concentration of warriors ever assembled. Custer and his troops were lionized and turned into heroes, but after the death of Custer’s wife, Elizabeth “Libbie” Custer, a popular Western author, who wrote three books building her husband's legend, historians finally revised the legend to reveal the truth. Custer was born on December 5, 1839 near New Rumley in eastern Ohio not far from Pittsburgh. He entered West Point in July 1857 and his time there was filled with demerits and a few times he managed to escape getting tossed out. While many of his classmates ended up serving as officers for the Confederates in the Civil War, Custer, who graduated last in his class of 34, was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the US 2nd Cavalry in June 1861. During the Civil War Custer was present at the First Battle of Bull Run but did not see action. Shortly afterwards he transferred to the Cavalry and was promoted to a 1st Lieutenant in July of 1862. From there he was quickly appointed as an aide to General McClellan with the acting rank of Captain. In June 1863, at the age of 23, Custer was made Brigadier General of volunteers. He did distinguish himself while in command of the Michigan Cavalry Brigade at the battle of Gettysburg and leading a cavalry charge 2 days later with the 7th Michigan Cavalry. He then served with the Army of the Potomac throughout 1864 and gained renown during battles in the Shenandoah Valley. At the end of the Civil War he was a Major General with the volunteers where he was leading a cavalry division. Custer loved publicity and the press loved him because he was young, a showman with long red hair and a taste for velvet jackets with gold braid. His men hated him. He was autocratic, dictatorial and incredibly arrogant. He was so bad that his post war command ended when his troops mutinied after Custer had reintroduced lashing as a form of discipline. After his command was disbanded, Custer mustered out of voluntary service in February 1866 and reverted to his Army rank of Captain, but he still liked to be referred to as General Custer. In early 1867 while on a recon mission Custer’s actions led to a court martial and he was found guilty of 1) absenting himself from his command, 2) using some troopers as an escort while on unofficial business, 3) abandoning two men reported killed on the march, 4) failing to pursue the Indians responsible, 5) failing recover the bodies, 6) ordering a party going after deserters to shoot to kill which resulted in 1 death and 3 wounded. But, that wasn't all! He was also found guilty of 7) unjustifiable cruelty to those wounded. As the military still does to this day, officers receive a much less harsh punishment than do enlisted personnel. Custer was sentenced to suspension from rank and pay for a year. While sitting out his suspension at home he was recalled to duty early due to a manpower shortage. His early recall resulted in a lot of bad feelings between Custer and the other officers in his regiment. The regiment saw minor action against the Indians for the next few years, but not Custer. it didn't matter; Custer published exaggerated accounts of the 7th Cavalry’s actions. Then in November of 1868, under Custer's command, the 7th Cavalry fought at the Battle of Washita River (or the Washita Massacre) over a hundred Indians were killed including some women and children. As a result, the Cheyenne referred to Custer as "Squaw Killer." Custer’s incompetence helped increase ill feeling towards him and in the spring 1873 the Regiment was moved to Dakota under command of Colonel D.S. Stanley. There, while protecting some railway engineers, the regiment skirmished with local Indians and Custer's actions ended up with him being charged with insubordination. Even a guy like Custer had friends though and they convinced Stanley to drop the charges. In 1874 an expedition was sent to the Black Hills. While there, Custer was accused by some of spreading stories of a gold find. As a result, prospectors followed and they were attacked by the Indians. These attacks were an excuse for a campaign against the Indians. The campaign was under General Alfred Terry who favored Custer even though at the time Custer was, again, in disgrace for having offended President Grant, Army Commander General William Sherman and his division commander General Phil Sheridan after having accused them of certain irregularities involving trading posts. While on patrol at the Little Big Horn, Custer again chose not to follow orders when he saw Indians in the valley below him...probably around 15,000 of them. He decided to split his force into three groups and attack from three directions... an idiotic plan considering his small force. Two prongs of the attack were driven back but made it to safety while Custer’s force was cut off and slaughtered by Crazy Horse’s Sioux. Custer had risen to power due to friends and supporters and, also, thanks to the press which was always seeking a good story. A lot of people died that day to serve the glory seeking of an arrogant and incompetent lout who was hardly deserving of a memorial. ― Tartajubow

    “You can only get good at chess if you love the game.” ― Bobby Fischer


    25 games, 1620-2018

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