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Kasparov vs Kramnik, 2000
London, England

 Kramnik-Kasparov 2000
 Kramnik (left) plays Kasparov for the title
Although Garry Kasparov was not recognized as champion by FIDE, the rest of the chess world continued to acknowledged him as the best player. He had continued to dominate the chess tournaments while FIDE's new system to select their champion, consisting of a single tournament of short knockout matches, offended the sensibilities of both players and fans. However, Kasparov had not played a match in 5 years, and believed that for his title to maintain its credibility, it was time to take on a new challenger.

The Braingames organization was created by a group headed by Grandmaster Ray Keene specifically to organize a match for Kasparov. Whereas the champion's challenger had since 1948 been the winner of a series of tournaments and matches, this time Kasparov's opponent was simply picked by GM Keene. Keene writes:

I personally selected Kramnik as the most worthy and dangerous opponent to play Kasparov in 2000. We wanted the best opponent possible for Kasparov. We chose the highest rated opponent, Anand, but he refused, so we went to the next man down on the ratings, Kramnik, who, by the way, overtook Anand in the ratings while the latter was considering whether to play or not. [1]
Vladimir Kramnik, born in Tuapse, Russia exhibited great potential very early in his chess career. At only 16, he won the under-18 World Championship. He then won first prize in many top International tournaments and was unbeaten in 86 classical games over 18 months up to July 2000.

The match was held in London England from October 8th to November 4th. Only 16 games were to be played, with Kasparov retaining his title in case of a tie. The purse was $2,000,000 dollars with 2/3rds going to the winner. Kramnik took an early lead by winning game 2, this was followed by 7 draws until Kramnik scored again in game 10. In the remaining games, Kasparov could not break through Kramnik's super-solid defences, notably the Berlin Defense of the Ruy Lopez.

After 15 games, with a final score of 8½ to 6½ Kasparov's long tenure as World Champion had finally come to an end. Vladimir Kramnik's had become the 14th World Chess Champion.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415
Kasparov½0½½½½½½½0½½½½½
Kramnik½1½½½½½½½1½½½½½

FINAL SCORE:  Kramnik 8½;  Kasparov 6½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Kramnik-Kasparov 2000]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #10     Kramnik vs Kasparov, 2000     1-0
    · Game #2     Kramnik vs Kasparov, 2000     1-0
    · Game #4     Kramnik vs Kasparov, 2000     1/2-1/2

FOOTNOTES

  1. Posted in Chessgames.com's Kibitzer's Corner by GM Ray Keene.

 page 1 of 1; 15 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½25 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
2. Kramnik vs Kasparov 1-040 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchD85 Grunfeld
3. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½53 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
4. Kramnik vs Kasparov ½-½74 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
5. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½24 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchA30 English, Symmetrical
6. Kramnik vs Kasparov ½-½66 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchD27 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
7. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½11 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchA31 English, Symmetrical, Benoni Formation
8. Kramnik vs Kasparov ½-½38 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
9. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½30 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
10. Kramnik vs Kasparov 1-025 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchE53 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3
11. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½41 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchC78 Ruy Lopez
12. Kramnik vs Kasparov ½-½33 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchE55 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Gligoric System, Bronstein Variation
13. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½14 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
14. Kramnik vs Kasparov ½-½57 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchA15 English
15. Kasparov vs Kramnik ½-½38 2000 Kasparov - Kramnik World Championship MatchE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 17 OF 17 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-05-15  Petrosianic: Really, Shirov was foolish. He should have just played for the lower stakes and gone down in history as a challenger. He'd have made a lot more money later on, and found his marketability increased, just as Short became more valuable for playing and losing.

Khalifman probably enjoys a slight bump even from holding the worthless FIDE title, but it's hard to tell. Nobody's heard from him in years.

Nov-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Shirov refused to accept the one and only offer for the match.>

Not so, because he'd played the match with Kramnik on the understanding that the Rentero offer was in place. At the time he rejected the American offer, how could he know that Kasparov would unilaterally declare the match null and void? What was the particular hurry?

<The Shirov-Kramnik challenger match was played from May 24th to June 5th, 1998 in Cazorla, Spain.>

<Billed as a warmup for his forthcoming WCC title match, Kasparov played a friendly six game match against Jan Timman in Prague, Czech Republic, starting September 6th 1998 (the match was sponsored by EuroTel). At the press conference on the eve of the match, Kasparov announced that his WCC title match with Shirov had been cancelled due to lack of sponsorship and funding.>

https://sites.google.com/site/carol...

Assuming these dates are correct, that's a mere three months.

It can certainly be argued that Shirov overvalued his market worth, and should've pragmatically accepted the American deal, and that Kasparov was simply being realistic in reneging on the match, but the greatest untruth in the whole affair was his claim that: <I was ready to play Shirov and I did everything possible to facilitate that.> (link above)

Nov-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: <Alexei Shirov: The collapse of the Kasparov match was connected with the failure of the autonomous government of Andalusia to live up to its oral promises.

The legal responsibility was borne by the president of the World Chess Council, Luis Rentero Suares, who had signed a contract with me specifying the conditions of both "matches” my match with Kramnik and the match of the winner with Kasparov.

At that time, he did not have the requisite guarantees from the Andalusian government, but that only became apparent later.

It was against Rentero that I filed a lawsuit in municipal court, but because of the extreme financial risk I did not pursue it to a higher level. I described the role of Kasparov in this story in my book Fire on Board 2, and I have no desire now to return to this theme and stir up bad memories.

I can only say that if there had not been some manipulation of the information that prevented me from finding out in time what was actually happening in Spain, and later in California, then we probably would have been able to agree [on a match].>

http://www.danamackenzie.com/blog/?...

Nov-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: If anyone has a copy of <Fire On Board 2> to hand, feel free.
Nov-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: It's part 2.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1857443829...

Nov-05-15  Mr 1100: <offramp: "In Anand - Gelfand World Chess Championship (2012) Boris Gelfand seemed to want to get the classic games out of the way as quickly as possible and try to win the world championship with a cheapo in a 5-minute game.">

Well, considering Gelfand's lifetime score against Anand at rapid chess, I'm not so sure anyone would have seen that as a very wise strategy.

<... Anand also didn't trouble himself - a boring match was the result.>

Again, it's perhaps worth also noting that, according to the Guid & Bratko computer assessment study published in 2013, the Anand-Gelfand 2012 match actually was rated as being one of the five best WCC matches of all time, indeed ranked above any of the famous Karpov-Kasparov matches. In addition, the Kramnik-Leko match of 2004, which resulted in a 7-7 draw, was actually rated the best match of all time.

Nov-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Part 2 is such sweet sorrow.
Nov-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Mr 1100: <offramp: "In Anand - Gelfand World Chess Championship (2012) Boris Gelfand seemed to want to get the classic games out of the way as quickly as possible and try to win the world championship with a cheapo in a 5-minute game."> Well, considering Gelfand's lifetime score against Anand at rapid chess, I'm not so sure anyone would have seen that as a very wise strategy.>

I thought it was a terrible idea. Had he tried a bit harder Gelfand might have won another game in normal time. But there was no effort there at all.

Nov-06-15  Petrosianic: <Mr 1100>: <Again, it's perhaps worth also noting that, according to the Guid & Bratko computer assessment study published in 2013, the Anand-Gelfand 2012 match actually was rated as being one of the five best WCC matches of all time, indeed ranked above any of the famous Karpov-Kasparov matches.>

A match in which every game was a 10 move draw that never left the book would rate perfectly on the scale you're talking about, but it would be foolish to recommend it as a good match on those grounds.

And Anand-Gelfand came closer to that than any other match.

Nov-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I think that one of most colossal matches was 1966 match. Very close to 1927 match. In same area as 1978 match.
Nov-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Absentee: <Petrosianic: A match in which every game was a 10 move draw that never left the book would rate perfectly on the scale you're talking about, but it would be foolish to recommend it as a good match on those grounds.>

It could be the best match never played.

Nov-07-15  Mr 1100: <Petrosianic: "...And Anand-Gelfand came closer to that than any other match.">

Well, look at the overall picture.

Anand-Kramnik (2008): 4 decisive games out of 11.

Anand-Topalov (2010): 5 decisive games out of 12.

Those match performances were also ranked highly by the Guid & Bratko study (http://tinyurl.com/o6t9nm8).

Kasparov-Anand (1995): a disappointing result for Anand, 4 losses out of 18 games.

The study looked at several WCC matches over the years, and their findings indicated Anand to be, overall, a more "accurate" player than any of his predecessors.

Within this context, the fact that the 2012 match was lacking in drama, doesn't really mean they were playing poorly. It was a 12-game match, and both players were being pragmatic, avoiding unnecessary risks.

Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Within this context, the fact that the 2012 match was lacking in drama, doesn't really mean they were playing poorly. It was a 12-game match, and both players were being pragmatic, avoiding unnecessary risks.>

Or as Nigel Short put it, if you play 25 moves of book and then call it a day, you won't make a lot of mistakes. Anand-Gelfand sucked.

Nov-09-15  Ulhumbrus: Kasparov says in his book that his preparation was was narrow and inflexible. He may mean that when Kramnik produced the Berlin defence Kasparov lacked an alternative first move such as 1 c4 or 1 d4, and when Kramnik found a way to gain the advantage against Kasparov's Gruenfeld defence, Kasparov once more lacked an alternative defence.
Nov-09-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Ulhumbrus: Kasparov says in his book that his preparation was was narrow and inflexible. He may mean that when Kramnik produced the Berlin defence Kasparov lacked an alternative first move such as 1 c4 or 1 d4, and when Kramnik found a way to gain the advantage against Kasparov's Gruenfeld defence, Kasparov once more lacked an alternative defence.>

Interesting, and kind of shocking. Tal was pretty much guilty of the same thing in the Botvinnik rematch, but you don't expect that from Kasparov.

Nov-09-15  SChesshevsky: <.. Kasparov says in his book that his preparation was narrow and inflexible.>

I took it that, relative to a world championship match, Kasparov admits he didn't prepare much at all.

I don't know if he should've prepared for the possibility of a Berlin Wall defense but it seemed like you could almost feel like in each progressive game Kasparov was getting nearer to solving it over the board.

What really must've of been disappointing and kind of showing a little rust was in his two losses Kasparov came up short on what seemed tactical combinations. Very surprising for a guy who's known as a great calculator.

Nov-10-15  Petrosianic: <but Kasparov would have slaughtered him in a rematch and he knew it.>

That's what you said about the first match. If you were wrong about that, couldn't you be wrong about the other?

It was in fact Kasparov who ducked the rematch for reasons that are well known. If you really don't know what they are, I'll be glad to tell you, but you're going to feel pretty silly.

Jan-03-16  Hawkman: It's ironic. This match is famous for the Berlin Defense of the Ruy Lopez, but it didn't win one game. It's kind of a tribute to how feared Kasparov's KP game was before this. When you're losing and are arguably the greatest player since Fischer, it would have been nice to see greater efforts from Garry in the 11 and 14 move games. I don't understand that.
Jan-14-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karne: After Game 10, Kasparov remarked that he hadn't been in a "great mood" throughout the match.
Feb-07-16  The Kings Domain: A sad and embarrassing example of how the mighty have fallen. A 1990-era Kasparov would not have played as badly.
Mar-07-16  Hawkman: For Kasparov to wait until the last game to try 1. d4 was just silly.
Aug-24-16  Howard: Was there ANY game in this match where Kasparov had decent winning chances ?
Aug-24-16  Olavi: <Howard> Games 8 and 1.
Aug-24-16  Olavi: Of course 8 and 14, and possibly also 12.
Aug-24-16  todicav23: Kasparov is just a bad looser. He always tries to find excuses. In this match he was not prepared and he was also in a bad mood.

But I think that his main weapons, openings and intimidation, didn't work as well in this match as against Anand.

It is true that later Kasparov was able to crack the Berlin defense beating Kramnik. But it was just a game and it doesn't prove much.

The overall score favors Kramnik (+5−4=40) in classical games. Also, Kasparov didn't really dominate Karpov. All their matches were close and Karpov was really unlucky in 1987. Karpov was 12 years older and it was clear that his main weakness was long matches.

I lived in a former communist country and every time when I hear Kasparov talking I remember about that. His character is really unpleasant.

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