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Karpov vs Kasparov, 1984-85
The Aborted Match

From the age of 12, the chess genius from Azerbaijan Garry Kasparov was setting new standards. After becoming the youngest player to win the USSR Junior Championship he went on to win the World Junior Championship at age 16. His style was aggressive and dynamic. On his seventeenth birthday he achieved the grandmaster title.

After defeating Beliavsky, Korchnoi, and Smyslov in the candidates matches, Kasparov earned the right to challenge Anatoly Karpov for the title. The match was held in Moscow. Once again, the format was the first to 6 wins, draws not counting.

 Karpov vs Kasparov
 Karpov and Kasparov, 1984
Karpov secured quick lead in the match, winning games 3, 6, 7, and 9 to establish a dominating score of 4-0. However, due an incredible series of draws, it wasn't until game 27 when Karpov claimed his 5th point. With the score 5-0, Karpov's victory appeared imminent, but this marathon struggle was outlasting everybody's expectations. Finally, on the 32nd game, Kasparov beat Karpov for the first time. After another long series of draws, Kasparov won game 47 and game 48, making the score 5 to 3.

At this stage, FIDE President Florencio Campomanes made a most unexpected and controversial decision: he called the match off.

At the press conference at which he announced his decision, Campomanes cited the health of the two players, which had been put under strain by the length of the match, despite that both Karpov and Kasparov stated that they would prefer the match to continue. Karpov had lost 10kg (22lb) over the course of the match. Kasparov, however, was in excellent health and extremely resentful of Campomanes' decision, asking him why he was abandoning the match if both players wanted to continue. It would appear that Kasparov, who had won the last two games before the suspension, felt the same way as some commentators: that he was now the favorite to win the match despite his 5-3 deficit. He appeared to be physically stronger than his opponent, and in the later games seemed to have been playing the better chess.[1]

The match lasted from September 10, 1984 to February 8, 1985. It was aborted after 48 games, making Karpov the de facto winner. A new match was scheduled to take place later in 1985.

click on a game number to replay game 1234567891011121314151617181920
Kasparov½½0½½00½0½½½½½½½½½½½
Karpov½½1½½11½1½½½½½½½½½½½

click on a game number to replay game 2122232425262728293031323334353637383940
Kasparov½½½½½½0½½½½1½½½½½½½½
Karpov½½½½½½1½½½½0½½½½½½½½

click on a game number to replay game 4142434445464748
Kasparov½½½½½½11
Karpov½½½½½½00

FINAL SCORE:  Karpov 5;  Kasparov 3 (40 draws)
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Karpov-Kasparov 1984/5]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #9     Karpov vs Kasparov, 1984     1-0
    · Game #6     Kasparov vs Karpov, 1984     0-1
    · Game #27     Karpov vs Kasparov, 1984     1-0

FOOTNOTES

  1. Garry Kasparov from Wikipedia.com

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 48  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½361984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchB81 Sicilian, Scheveningen, Keres Attack
2. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½471984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE17 Queen's Indian
3. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-0311984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchB44 Sicilian
4. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½441984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
5. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½211984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchB83 Sicilian
6. Kasparov vs Karpov 0-1701984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
7. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-0441984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD34 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
8. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½201984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
9. Karpov vs Kasparov 1-0701984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD34 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
10. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½151984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE12 Queen's Indian
11. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½411984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchA15 English
12. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½211984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD58 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) Syst
13. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½331984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchA15 English
14. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½161984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
15. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½931984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
16. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½371984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
17. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½231984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD58 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) Syst
18. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½251984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
19. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½511984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
20. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½191984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchA15 English
21. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½341984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
22. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½251984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchE06 Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3
23. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½221984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
24. Kasparov vs Karpov ½-½171984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchA33 English, Symmetrical
25. Karpov vs Kasparov ½-½221984Karpov - Kasparov World Championship MatchD58 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tartakower (Makagonov-Bondarevsky) Syst
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 48  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 31 OF 31 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <offramp: It was a purely financial decision. FIDÉ was paying a fortune in hotel and venue costs. The venue had already been changed to somewhere cheaper.>

That may be true, but it's not what Campomanes said. He cited only the health issues, and the fact that neither player was able to continue (even though neither player was making that claim, and Campomanes was not a doctor.)

If he'd cancelled it after Game 46 on the grounds that it was going nowhere and had become an organizational nightmare, only Karpov would have complained. But cancelling it because it's going nowhere right at the moment that it's going somewhere would have sounded phony (and been phony).

Sep-19-17  Howard: Yes, I never understand why Campo cancelled the match at the time he did---that is, after Kasparov had just won two straight games. Did he underestimate the flak that would almost inevitably occur?

He probably should have waited another, say, another 4-5 games before deciding to cancel. If those next several games had been draws, then Kasparov's two wins probably would have looked like a fluke, and thus calling off the match probably wouldn't have looked so suspicious.

Not only that, if Karpov had managed to win a sixth game during that, say, Game 49-52 stretch, then Campos would obviously have not had to make any decision !

Just seemed that Campos picked a very "sensitive" moment to terminate the contest.

Sep-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Hmm.. I guess they didn't cancel it in one day.

Maybe Karpov suspected something and it affected his play.

Pure peculation but I heard Soviet officials complaining about the use of the (national) building for too long.

So I guess, also considering the state the Soviet Union was in, there must have been rumours about the upcoming cancellation.

Sep-19-17  Everett: As I said above, it's only the nature of the match length that stopped Karpov here. The fact that it is Fischer's idiocy that suggested this format in the first place adds extra irony to it all.
Sep-19-17  nok: <He probably should have waited another, say, another 4-5 games before deciding to cancel.>

He did propose to play eight more games. Kasparov refused, preferring that the match be stopped immediately. This was before the last game. Anyway, the players knew game 48 might be the last.

Sep-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Probably posted before:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Sep-19-17  Howard: Yes, now I remember. It was suggested that the match continue for a limited number of additional games, but Kasparov objected.
Sep-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: He'd have been foolish to accept. If there were, say 8 games left, Karpov could go all out for a win, knowing that it could blow up in his face twice without repercussion.
Sep-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Lim Kok Ann wrote, in early 1986,

<"Campomanes states that at first (in December) only the suspension of [this match] was considered, as a solution to the impasse – the players objected to <change of playing hall> 'against regulations'; the organizing committee’s lease on the Hall of Columns had long lapsed, and the hall was required for funerals, inter alia ...
Apparently Kasparov remarked that instead of a suspension he would prefer the match be terminated. This rash remark first put the idea to Campo that termination could be a solution...">

Sep-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Petrosianic: <offramp: It was a purely financial decision. FIDÉ was paying a fortune in hotel and venue costs. The venue had already been changed to somewhere cheaper.> That may be true, but it's not what Campomanes said. He cited only the health issues, and the fact that neither player was able to continue (even though neither player was making that claim, and Campomanes was not a doctor.)...>

He would, wouldn't he? When a company is about to go bankrupt the CEO comes on telly and says that the responsibility lies with interest rates, market corrections, crop failure in Tashkent, Hurricane Irma - anything except "Our business system has proved a total failure."

Sep-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Whoa I guess my memory is not that bad. But I can find nothing about Karpov's weight loss. Although I remember that as well.

I mean... didn't he eat enough?

Sep-20-17  nok: Iirc that's some crapola that appeared in the British press. (When Keene is around, beware.) At the end the players may have been more tired by the negotiations than anything else.
Sep-20-17  Howard: As far as Karpov's "weight loss" he was reported to have lost weight during his near-marathon 1978 match with Korchnoi. Inside Chess, in fact, mentioned it in a 1991 issue.
Sep-20-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: That's because they were serving him yoghurt during the game. If Yoghurtgate had been Pork Rind Gate, Karpov would have gained.
Sep-22-17  Howard: Petrosianic, I'll make the same comment to you that I made to the Chessmind blog about a week ago...

....when are people going to stop using the suffix "gate" when referring to scandals or controversies ?! Not all of us were around from 1972-74, after all.

The Chessmind blog, incidentally, used the term "shortsgate", which prompted me to email them about it.

Sep-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: I feel your pain on this. I guess it'll stop happening when there's a different scandal with a catchy name that people can riff on.

But it's not just "Gate". There are a LOT of phrases that people use without having any idea where they come from. Like "he's down to his last red cent". Do you have any idea what a red cent is? Neither do I, but we've both heard the expression.

A lot of software seems to allude to machinery that doesn't exist any more. You may never have seen a mechanical cash register, but I'll bet you know that a "Ka-CHING" sound refers to raking in money. One of my favorites is Modem software with an icon of an old style desktop rotary phone. Most people have never seen such a thing. To them a phone is a flat, rectangular thing, not this weird looking contraption.

So I can see how it may be annoying, but really for better or worse, "Gate" has passed into the vernacular as a way of labeling something a scandal.

Sep-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: But hey, it could be worse. If not for Watergate, all scandals might be named after Teapot Dome. Karpov-Korchnoi would have Yoghurt Dome, the Kovalyov business would be Shorts Dome. And so on. I think we're better off with gate.
Sep-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: <Petro>

I guess "he's down to his brown cent" means something completely different..


Hint: in Holland cents were made from copper. And they get brown after a while.

Sep-22-17  beatgiant: <Petrosianic>
<Do you have any idea what a red cent is? Neither do I> I thought it was because cents used to be pure copper and were indeed reddish, and I did not think this was an obscure bit of knowledge.

Your larger point does still stand. Language is full of these things. When will "-thon" stop being used for any lengthy and arduous effort? (marathon, telethon, walkathon...) How many even think of the original Battle of Marathon when using these words?

So, I'm afraid <Howard> will just have to bite the bullet.

Sep-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <beatgiant>: <When will "-thon" stop being used for any lengthy and arduous effort? (marathon, telethon, walkathon...) How many even think of the original Battle of Marathon when using these words?>

That's a really good example, that had never occurred to me at all. I guess all those words do come from marathon, don't they?

<I thought it was because cents used to be pure copper and were indeed reddish, and I did not think this was an obscure bit of knowledge.>

I might have heard that before, but had forgotten it. I've never seen copper that looked red to me, and I saw a lot of copper ornaments on a trip to Santa Fe recently. But maybe they weren't pure.

Sep-22-17  beatgiant: <Petrosianic>
<I've never seen copper that looked red to me>

You're right, "brown cent" as in the Dutch idiom cited by <WorstPlayerEver> must be a more accurate description of the least valuable possible coin.

I just googled "red penny" and learned that it is a coin collecting term, where "red" is mint condition and "brown" is used condition. They are more colorful but not really "red," and "red" ones are actually more valuable for collectors than "brown" ones.

So this theory for the origin of the "red cent" idiom makes no sense! You were right, I have no idea why we say that.

Sep-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: My mother used phrases like: "Sit your brown cent down!"

Little wonder I was kind of restless 😯

Sep-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <beatgiant>: <You're right, "brown cent" as in the Dutch idiom cited by <WorstPlayerEver> must be a more accurate description of the least valuable possible coin.>

I did a little checking to try to find out why being redder or purer would make it less valuable. One site I found says that it really doesn't, that "red" is merely an intensifier, and that you could say "down to his last darned cent", and be saying the same thing.

Sep-26-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Everett: As I said above, it's only the nature of the match length that stopped Karpov here. The fact that it is Fischer's idiocy that suggested this format in the first place adds extra irony to it all.>

Proves Fischer's point exactly.

He knew Karpov was weak the longer a match went on. He knew a match where winning mattered, not draws, favored Fischer.

That said, Fischer probably couldn't imagine all the cheap draws they took.

Oct-22-17  rayoflight: <diceman>If you look at second-half of Fischer-Spassky 1972 match (if your Fischerism even allow it), you would observe several draws.Then how long should such a match goes on? If you look at Carlsen-Karjakian 2016 match (again if your Fiscehrism allows it), you would observe several draws even in those games which Carlsen really pushed for a win and he failed.Then question is how long should such a match goes on?

Keep playing till one side hits 6 wins was and is pure @#$%*&!#. Fischer knew very well he is never going to compete again therefore he issued some absolute nonsense to forge a justification for it.

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