chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

  
Johannes von Minckwitz
Number of games in database: 182
Years covered: 1865 to 1892
Overall record: +64 -73 =44 (47.5%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      1 exhibition game, odds game, etc. is excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (23) 
    C80 C77 C67 C66 C64
 French Defense (13) 
    C15 C01 C11 C14 C13
 Center Game (7) 
    C22
 Queen's Gambit Declined (7) 
    D30 D37 D35
 Giuoco Piano (7) 
    C50 C54
 Ruy Lopez, Open (6) 
    C80
With the Black pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (31) 
    C77 C67 C80 C63 C83
 Four Knights (13) 
    C49 C47 C48
 Sicilian (10) 
    B45 B46 B44 B40
 Ruy Lopez, Open (9) 
    C80 C83
 Evans Gambit (8) 
    C51 C52
 Sicilian Taimanov (7) 
    B45 B46
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Steinitz vs J Minckwitz, 1870 0-1
   Tarrasch vs J Minckwitz, 1885 0-1
   J Minckwitz vs Chigorin, 1881 1-0
   Tarrasch vs J Minckwitz, 1889 1/2-1/2

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Berlin (1881)
   Baden-Baden (1870)
   Hamburg (1885)
   Leipzig (1879)
   Breslau (1889)

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Johannes von Minckwitz
Search Google for Johannes von Minckwitz


JOHANNES VON MINCKWITZ
(born Apr-11-1843, died May-20-1901, 58 years old) Germany

[what is this?]
Johannes Minckwitz was a German player and author of IM strength. He edited 'Deutsche Schachzeitung', had a chess column in 'Leipziger Illustrirte Zeitung' and wrote two books on chess. In tournaments he was 2nd at Barmen 1869, 1st= at Krefeld 1871 and 2nd at Graz 1880. On the 17th of May 1901 he threw himself underneath an electric train and lost both arms. He died three days later.

source: Chicago Daily Tribune, May 19,1901, page 20

Wikipedia article: Johannes Minckwitz


 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 182  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. E Schmidt vs J Minckwitz  1-026 1865 LeipzigC01 French, Exchange
2. J Minckwitz vs R Schurig  1-052 1865 LeipzigC58 Two Knights
3. R Gottschall vs J Minckwitz 0-121 1865 LeipzigC23 Bishop's Opening
4. J Minckwitz vs E Schmidt  ½-½28 1865 Leipzig simC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
5. G Neumann vs J Minckwitz 1-044 1865 Berlin (Germany)C51 Evans Gambit
6. J Minckwitz vs E Schmidt  ½-½43 1866 Leipzig mC15 French, Winawer
7. J Minckwitz vs E Schmidt  0-137 1866 Leipzig mC51 Evans Gambit
8. E Schmidt vs J Minckwitz  0-130 1866 Leipzig mC44 King's Pawn Game
9. E Schmidt vs J Minckwitz  1-059 1866 Leipzig mC67 Ruy Lopez
10. Anderssen vs J Minckwitz  1-049 1866 BerlinC30 King's Gambit Declined
11. J Minckwitz vs Anderssen  1-024 1866 BerlinC54 Giuoco Piano
12. J Minckwitz vs E Schmidt 0-150 1866 Leipzig mC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
13. J Minckwitz vs Anderssen 1-061 1866 BerlinC67 Ruy Lopez
14. J Minckwitz vs Anderssen  0-119 1866 BerlinC54 Giuoco Piano
15. J Minckwitz vs E Schmidt  0-140 1866 Leipzig mD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
16. E Schmidt vs J Minckwitz  0-138 1866 Leipzig mB40 Sicilian
17. Anderssen vs J Minckwitz  0-133 1866 BerlinB46 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
18. E Schmidt vs J Minckwitz  1-044 1866 Leipzig mC44 King's Pawn Game
19. S Mieses vs J Minckwitz  0-136 1869 LeipzigC80 Ruy Lopez, Open
20. Paulsen vs J Minckwitz 1-046 1869 NSB-02.KongressC77 Ruy Lopez
21. J Minckwitz vs Anderssen  0-147 1869 WSB-08.KongressC77 Ruy Lopez
22. Zukertort vs J Minckwitz  1-034 1869 BerlinC42 Petrov Defense
23. Anderssen vs J Minckwitz  1-039 1869 NSB-02.KongressC77 Ruy Lopez
24. J Minckwitz vs Zukertort  ½-½52 1869 WSB-08.Kongress+C77 Ruy Lopez
25. E Schallopp vs J Minckwitz 1-022 1869 WSB-08.KongressA83 Dutch, Staunton Gambit
 page 1 of 8; games 1-25 of 182  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Minckwitz wins | Minckwitz loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-27-05  athyn: Sounds like a sore loser to me.
May-01-06  EmperorAtahualpa: He finished last in the important Baden-Baden 1870 tournament.

http://www.endgame.nl/bad1870.htm

May-19-06  BIDMONFA: Johannes von Minckwitz

MINCKWITZ, Johannes Von
http://www.bidmonfa.com/minckwitz_j...
_

Jul-20-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Here is another picture of <Johannes von Minckwitz> : http://www.ballo.de/Images/Minckwit...
Apr-11-08  brankat: J.Minckwitz was a strong master of the period. Baden-Baden, 1870 was really the first "super-tournament". Just to be invited to participate tells about a players strength.

A writer on chess theory, and a magazine editor.

May-07-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Bio:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann...
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann...
Apr-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Player of the Day

<Knight13> You'll find the answer in the German Bio. :((

Apr-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Here is a nice endame study from Minckwitz, published in <The Westminster Papers, 1871> White to move mates in four.


click for larger view

Apr-11-09  WhiteRook48: happy birthday
Apr-11-09  Octal: <whiteshark>: Is the first move 1 Bb4? Then to be followed by moving the rook and 3 Bf8#? But it won't take 3 moves because Black can play ...Nc5, forcing another move via Bxc5.
Apr-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Octal> Sorry, after <1.Bb4> Black will play <1...h1=Q> with threats of 2...Qc6+ or ...Qa1+.

You may like to try it again. I've posted the solution in my forum. :D

Apr-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <whiteshark>: 1. Bh4.

A) 1...h1=Q 2. Bxg5#.

B) 1...gxh4 2. Re5 Bg6 (if any other move, then Rh5# will follow) 3. Rh5+ Bxh5 4. g5#.

Apr-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: <Knight13><On the 15th of May 1901 he threw himself underneath an electric train and lost both arms.> Why did he do that!!? Pain suicide?

Knight13,
According to the Oxford Companion of Chess, Minckwitz was suffered mental and psychological problems, and probably decided life was not worth living any more.

Apr-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <al wazir> Bravo! :D
Apr-13-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: From Tarrasch's 1906 article on Pillsbury, which also discussed other cases of insanity among chess masters. The full article as well as the German original is on the Tarrasch page.

<For Minckwitz chess has not the slightest to do with his mental illness, which in my opinion must be ascribed to “primary hallucinatory madness” <”primare halluzinatorische Verrucktheit”>. Minckwitz was unfortunately placed, such that he was at great risk of mental illness. Of his father, a professor at Leipzig University, it is recounted (not as a funny story, but as truth) that he used to say in his lectures: “There are only three great German writers: Schiller, Goethe, and the third modesty forbids me to name.” <This reads exactly like Janowski’s alleged statement about the great chessmasters of his own time – perhaps Janowski's quote is spurious?> This was the era in which Paul Lindau went eagerly on the hunt for Sunday poets <Sonntagdichtern> and, when he found one, tore him to pieces to the delight of the public. He came upon Minckwitz’s epic “The War for Liberation” <”Die Befreiungskriege”> and quoted the following verse describing the Battle of Leipzig:

Napoleon was yellow like a pickled egg <Solei>, Anyone who saw him knew good health he must beg.

<Napoleon war gelb wie ein Solei, Man sah ihm an, dass ihm nicht wohl sei.>

<Obviously I warped the meaning for the sake of getting a rhyme.>

Such a dreadful verse speaks volumes. With such an inheritance, we can rule out chess from the etiology of Minkwitz’s mental illness; surely it did him less harm than alcohol, to which he was strongly attached.>

Apr-13-10  FHBradley: Witty but bad taste, Dr. Tarrasch.
Apr-13-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <FHBradley: Witty but bad taste, Dr. Tarrasch.>

Hard to disagree.

Sep-23-11  zydeco: There's a nice tribute to Minckwitz in Checkmate Magazine, Vol 1, calling him a first-rate theorist and problemist but with very bad nerves. "Frequently Minckwitz gained a great superiority in the opening, middlegame, and even endgame, only to lose by a complete and sudden collapse - not a blunder but seemingly a relaxation of mental powers."

Once, when his opponent (Wilfried Paulsen) overstepped the time limit, Minckwitz wanted to keep playing and eventually lost "by the usual collapse." The tournament director solomonically ruled the game a loss for both players.

The eulogy in Checkmate concludes discreetly by saying that "some years ago it became necessary to refuse his entry to all public tournaments" - which means, I assume, that he's completely loony.

Minckwitz wrote a book called Humor in Chess, which looks like it might be interesting (the chapters are titled things like 'A terrible vision of H. Lehner'/'Sufferings and joys of a problem composer') but available only in German.

British Chess Magazine, in 1886, speculates that he may be the strongest player in Germany (along with Bardeleben). BCM mentions that his father was a noted classics professor and that Minckwitz emerged as a strong player when he was young (he became editor of Schachzeitung at 22).

Apr-11-12  brankat: R.I.P. master Minckwitz.
Aug-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: <Der bekannte Schachmeister Hans Minckwitz wurde am Abend des 15.Mai in Biebrich von der elektrischen Bahn überfahren und ist, nachdem ihm beide Arme amputirt wurden, am 20. Mai im Krankenhaus zu Biebrich gestorben. Minckwitz litt in den letzten Jahren an Wahnvorstellungen und hat sich vermuthlich in einem Anfall von Geistesstörung in selbstmörderischer Absicht überfahren lassen. Er war als Sohn des ehemaligen Leipziger Professors Johannes Minckwitz am 11. April zu Leipzig geboren und hatte sich in früheren Jahren durch seine Thätigkeit als Schachredacteur, sowie durch seine rege Betheiligung an Schachturnieren in weiteren Kreisen bekannt gemacht.>

From page 100 of the 1901 'Wiener Schachzeitung'

Aug-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: On pages 338 to 342 of the 1906 'Wiener Schachzeitung', Dr. W. Ahrens from Magdeburg under the heading <Dr. Siegbert Tarrasch als Historiker und Pathograph> tores to shreds Dr. Tarrasch's article on Pillsbury but concentrates on the part where Dr. Tarrasch discusses Minckwitz (see <keypusher>'s post from 2010.04.13).

The first anecdote about Minckwitz Sr. claiming to be the greatest German poet together with Von Goethe and Schiller, is most likely apocryphal and this kind of saying has been assigned to others before (e. g. Konrad Büchell). Dr. Ahrens devotes a lot of attention to this part and points e. g. out that Minckwitz Sr. was a great admirer of Count August von Platen-Hallermünde and translated his odes into greek (so he would rather be Minckwitz's Nr. 3). Apparently, the only actual case of this form of joke (with two people instead of three) was that of Dr. Tarrasch saying that there were only two chessmasters - and the other one was living in New York.

The second one, about Napoleon and the pickled egg, Dr. Ahrens claims that Minckwitz did not write it. That he actually did not even write an epic called 'Die Befreiungskriege' and that the verses were just a parody by Paul Lindau.

Aug-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <Karpova> You might also enjoy Game Collection: Deutsche Schachzeitung
May-22-13  Yopo: [Event "Berlin (Germany)"]
[Site "Berlin (Germany)"]
[Date "1877.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Johannes Minckwitz "]
[Black "Simon A Winawer "]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C84"]
[PlyCount "57"]
[EventDate "1877.??.??"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 Be7 7. Qe2 f5 8. dxe5 O-O 9. Nc3 Nxc3 10. Qc4+ Kh8 11. Qxc3 b5 12. Bb3 a5 13. a3 Ra6 14. Bf4 Nb8 15. Rad1 a4 16. Bd5 c6 17. Ba2 c5 18. e6 d6 19. Ne5 Bf6 20. Qg3 c4 21. Nf7+ Rxf7 22. exf7 Be7 23. Rfe1 Bd7 24. Rxe7 Qxe7 25. Bxd6 Qxf7 26. Bxb8 Rg6 27. Qc7 Re6 28. h3 Re7 29. Rxd7 1-0

Oct-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Source: Deutsches Wochenschach, 6 July 1890, issue 27, pp. 221-223

Part I:

Editor of the 'Deutsche Schachzeitung' from 1864 to 31 December 1886, with short breaks.

Johannes G. E. L. von Minckwitz ("Hans"), son of Prof. Dr. Johannes Minckwitz of Leipzig (author, poet and translator. <Verewigt> in Heidelberg, Germany on 29 December 1885) and his wife Ernestine (née Schuchardt) of Magdeburg, Germany. Hans was born on 11 April 1843 in Leipzig, Germany. His chess career has been spanning 36 years now (i. e. in July 1890). His father, a <starker Naturspieler>, i. e. no formal chess education but very hard to beat, taught him the game of chess. He also played against Graf Vitzthum von Eckstädt, Otto Wigand, H. Hirschbach and others as a boy, because they were all acquaintances of his father. Very important were also the problems in the Leipzig 'Illustrirten Zeitung', whose chess column he would later edit.

Hans went to school at the <Moderne Gesamtgymnasium> in Leipzig, and Friedrich Spielhagen was one of his teachers. At the age of 15, he joined a Leipzig wholesale firm and stayed there for 9 years. Still, he found time to visit the Leipzig <Hochschule>, studying macroeconomics under Roscher. He also advanced rapidly in chess theory and practice. In 1863, he already published chess problems. In 1864, he won 1st prize in the problem tournament of the West-German Chess Federation (help-mate). Further prizes for problems: 1867 2nd prize ('Neue Berliner Schachzeitung'), 1868 1st prize (West-German Chess Federation), 1869 3rd prize (North-German Chess Federation), 1874 1st prize (Westminster Papers) and 1876 2nd prize (German Chess Federation).

In 1869, Hans shared 3rd prize with Schallopp and Zukertort in the Hamburg <Meisterturnier>. He won 2nd prize at Barmen (1869). He shared 1st prize with Anderssen and Paulsen at Krefeld (1871). He won 4th prize at Frankfurt (1878), 5th prize at Brunswick (1880) and 2nd prize at Graz (1880). He couldn't repeat his success of 1871, because he usually didn't play serious games afterwards, and so went to tournaments unprepared. At the latest Hamburg tournament, he was a contender for 1st prize for a long time, but he couldn't show his best and didn't win a prize (perhaps Hamburg 1885 - http://www.edochess.ca/tournaments/... - is meant).

In 1865, Hans became chess editor of the (Leipzig) 'Schachzeitung' together with Dr. E. v. Schmidt (who has been working as a journalist in Moscow for many years now (probably July 1890 is meant by "now"). The 'Schachzeitung' was renamed 'Deutsche Schachzeitung' in 1871 (Why it said that Hans was an editor from 1864 onwards in the first paragraph, but now gives 1865, I don't know). From 1868 onwards, Hans was its sole editor, except for 1876 to 1879, when someone else had to do the job, since Hans was absent from Leipzig at that time. He also edited the chess columns of the 'Illustrirten Zeitung', the 'Leipziger Tageblatt' and others. His chess literary career is still not finished yet (as of July 1890). He contributed to the advance of theory and he instigated the foundation of a German Chess Federation.

Oct-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Source: Deutsches Wochenschach, 6 July 1890, issue 27, pp. 221-223

Part II:

Hans published the following works he authored himself: 'Der Schachkongress zu Krefeld 1871', 'Das ABC des Schachspiels', 'Der Schachkongress zu Frankfurt a. M. 1878', 'Der Schachkongress zu Hamburg 1885', 'Humor im Schachspiel' (1885), 'Der Entscheidungskampf zwischen W. Steinitz und J. H. Zukertort um die Schachmeisterschaft der Welt' (1886), 'Der Schachmatador' (1886), 'Der kleine Schachkönig' (1888). He was awarded the honorary membership of many Chess Societies, e. g. Chess Society Augustea of Leipzig, Academic Chess Club of Leipzig, Chess Club of Frankfurt on the Main, Nuremberg Chess Club, Dresden Chess Club, Chess Club Carola of Leipzig, <Gymnasiasten-Schachchklub Germania> of Bremen, <Gymnasiasten-Schachchklub Germania> of Göttingen, Charlottenburg Chess Society, and so on.

Hans joined a Leipzig bank as <Hauptbuchhalter> (main accounting clerk) in 1872 and soon rose to the rank of a <Bankbevollmächtigter> (bank commissioner perhaps). In 1876, he believed to be entitled to become director, and the <Verwaltungsrat> (board of administration) made him the manager of <Kohlewerke> (coal plants) and brick manufactures in Silesia. This proved to be a mistake in two regards: Han didn't like his new post and the one who was chosen as a director instead, Winkelmann and his co-director Dr. Jerusalem didn't keep house to the best of the institute. The institute went suddenly bankrupt in 1887, both directors fled and were wanted. Dr. Jerusalem committed suicide in Munich.

Ten years earlier, Hans had given up the post and he went back to Leipzig, also because of his chess literary work. He had been publishing chess poems in the 'Schachzeitung' since 1863. In 1870, he published 'Deutschlands Traum, Kampf und Sieg' with sonnets and <Königsliedern> (King's songs). The author notes that the content demonstrated considerable talent and thereby differed positively from the <Kriegsdichtung> (war poetry) of that time. He is now working on larger epics. His patriotic enthusiasm he already demonstrated when joining the <deutsche Burschenschaft> (German fraternity) in 1864, which did a lot to heighten the patriotic mind.

He had been a critic of epics and lyric for Brockhaus' 'Blätter für Literarische Unterhaltung' since 1883, in which he successfully fought for the Lessing-Platen-Minckwitz point of view. Hans is also author of the political-financial <Flugschrift> (pamphlet) 'Jungdeutschland' (Leipzig 1887, pseudonym Arminius) and other works. He has been living in Berlin from 1887 to 1889, but now he moved (withdrew, <zurückgezogen>) to the pleasant <Gartengrundstück> (garden estate) in Belgern on the Elbe. Apart from literary work and research (chess, poetry, historical, macroeconomical), he is also conducting heraldic studies, to support his entitlement to a <Freiherrntitel> (Baron), he himself tracing back his ancestry to von Minckwitzburg and even later back to <Fürst> (prince, sovereign) Inkwi.

< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific player and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies