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D Howell 
David Howell
Number of games in database: 766
Years covered: 1998 to 2015
Last FIDE rating: 2705 (2640 rapid, 2649 blitz)
Highest rating achieved in database: 2712
Overall record: +316 -161 =239 (60.8%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      50 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (112) 
    B22 B40 B90 B52 B30
 French Defense (47) 
    C05 C07 C03 C02 C10
 French Tarrasch (37) 
    C05 C07 C03 C04 C09
 Ruy Lopez (32) 
    C67 C65 C69 C92 C68
 Caro-Kann (23) 
    B14 B13 B12 B16 B10
 English (19) 
    A13 A14 A15 A11 A16
With the Black pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (95) 
    C67 C65 C77 C96 C78
 Grunfeld (80) 
    D85 D86 D80 D94 D97
 English (44) 
    A15 A16 A10 A13
 Ruy Lopez, Closed (27) 
    C96 C99 C88 C91 C86
 English, 1 c4 e5 (14) 
    A29 A21 A20 A26 A22
 Giuoco Piano (13) 
    C54 C53 C50
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   D Howell vs A Bitalzadeh, 2009 1-0
   D Howell vs P H Nielsen, 2010 1-0
   D Howell vs Nakamura, 2015 1/2-1/2
   D Howell vs McShane, 2010 1/2-1/2
   D Howell vs M Roiz, 2015 1-0
   R Palliser vs D Howell, 2005 0-1
   D Howell vs D Naroditsky, 2015 1-0
   D Howell vs Carlsen, 2009 1/2-1/2
   D Howell vs Nijboer, 2009 1-0
   B Sambuev vs D Howell, 2014 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   British Championship (2009)
   100th British Championship (2013)
   Hastings Chess Congress (2010)
   Tradewise Gibraltar (2015)
   British Chess Championships (2014)
   Rilton Cup (2007)
   British Championships (2015)
   British Championships (2012)
   British Championship (2007)
   World Junior Championship (2008)
   British Championships (2011)
   E.U. Championship and Cork Chess Congress (2005)
   World Junior Championship (2006)
   European Individual Championships (2010)
   Chess Olympiad (2014)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   England at the Dresden Olympiad by capybara
   B22 by blohmoremoney

Search Sacrifice Explorer for David Howell
Search Google for David Howell
FIDE player card for David Howell

(born Nov-14-1990, 25 years old) United Kingdom

[what is this?]
FIDE Master (2001); International Master (2004); Grandmaster (2007); British U8 champion (1998); British U9 Champion (1999); British U10 Champion (1999); IAPS U13 Champion (1999); British Champion (2009 & 2013), British co-Champion (2014).

Early days (1)

David Wei Lang Howell learned the moves from his father in July 1996 when he was five years old. He played his first tournament, the Sussex U11 Open, two months later, winning three games out of six. He studied under the guidance of GM Glenn Flear. (2) His initial rating at the age of 10 was 2193, above which it has always remained. Since that time he has steadily progressed through the ranks such that by 2015, he is the second rated player in the United Kingdom, second only to Michael Adams.

Master qualifications and norms

<FIDE Master> Howell won his FM title when he placed =1st in the European U12 Championship which ended 9 September 2001. (1) He gained his FM title at the age of 10 years 9 months and 26 days.

<International Master> He gained his three IM norms at the First Saturday IM Tournament in Budapest in April 2003, which he won; the British Championship, Edinburgh, in 2003; and at the Gibraltar Masters (2004) which finished 5 February 2004. (1) Howell thereby gained his IM title at the age of 13 years 2 months and 22 days.

<Grandmaster norms> He obtained the three necessary GM norms between 2004 and 2007 at the 4NCL team tournament (season 2004/5); the CCA-ICC International at New York in 2005 and at Stockholm's Rilton Cup (2007). (2) Thus on 5 January 2007, he earned his GM title aged 16 years and 1 month and 22 days.


<Youth> Howell was the British Under-8 Champion in 1998 and the British Under-9 and Under-10 champion in 1999. He won the London Junior Under-14 Chess Congress in 1999, while he was nine years old, breaking the record set by Nigel Short. He was second at the European U10 Championship staged in Halkidiki, Greece in October 2000 and =1st (3rd on tiebreak) at the European U12 Championship 2001 that was staged in Oropesa del Mar in Spain. In November 2002, he won bronze at the World U12 Championship played in Crete.(1) In October 2008, he scored 7.5/11 at the World U18 Championship staged in Vietnam, half a point behind the five co-leaders Ivan Saric (the winner on tiebreak), Ngoc Truongson Nguyen, Samuel Shankland, Ioan-Cristian Chirila and Samvel Ter-Sahakyan. This last result was something of a disappointment as he lost over 10 rating points from this result.

<School> Howell won the Independent Association of Prep Schools U13 Championship in April 1999 a the age of eight, the youngest player to do so. (1)

<Junior (U20)> He first participated in the World arena in this division when he was 15 years old at the World Junior Championship (2006), scoring a solid 8/13. The following year he improved with 7.5/11 at the World Junior Championship (2007), placing =5th. Further improvement followed at the World Junior Championship (2008) where scored 9/13 to place =3rd behind Abhijeet Gupta and Parimarjan Negi. He lost momentum at the 48th World Junior Championship (2009) where his 8/13 was sufficient for =9th, 2.5 points off the lead.

<National> He first played in the British Championship in early 2000 at the age of nine, the youngest person ever to qualify for that event. (1) He has regularly participated in this event, placing 3rd at the British Championships (2012) and winning twice outright: at the British Championship (2009) with 9/11 and at the 100th British Championship (2013) with a round to spare. He was co-winner, with Jonathan Hawkins, of the British Chess Championships (2014), and then a runner-up alongside Nicholas Pert and Daniel Gormally behind Hawkins the following year at the British Championships (2015).

<Continental> David's first tilt at a continental championship was at the European Individual Championships (2007) where he scored a par-for-rating 6/11. He improved with his next effort, that being at the European Union Championships (2008), where he scored 7/10 and placing =5th, a point behind the winner Jan Werle, and half a point behind joint second place getters Nigel Short, Viktor Laznicka and Michael Adams. The following year at the European Individual Championships (2010), he scored 7.5/11, placing =11th. Unfortunately, his placement on tiebreak meant that he missed the cut for the World Cup 2011. His 7/11 at the 13th European Individual Championship (2012) and 6.5/11 at the European Individual Championship (2015) were below his usual standard and again he failed to qualify for the next World Cup.

Standard Tournaments

<2001-2006> The most significant tournament David played in during this early stage of his career was the Hastings Challenger Tournament played over the 2001-02 New Year period when he defeated Colin McNab (see below). In April 2003 he won first prize at the First Saturday IM Tournament, Budapest also gaining his first IM norm. He gained his third IM norm at the Gibtelecom Masters tournament in early 2004 (see above) and in February 2005, he won the Jersey Festival Open with 6/7 and two months later placed 2nd to veteran IM Ralf Akesson at the category 7 Gausdal Classics GM B in Norway.

<2007-2009> He placed =2nd at the 2006-7 Rilton Cup, scoring 7/9 - this was the event in which he won his final GM norm. In March 2008, he won the category 10 round robin Jack Speigel Memorial at Southend in England with 6/7, well clear of Peter K Wells (4.5/7) and Lawrence Trent (4/7). In July 2008, he was clear first at the 26th Andorran International Open with 8/9, half a point ahead of outright 2nd placed Romain Edouard. In October 2008, he won the Master Open at the 8th Winterthurer Chess Week (in Switzerland) with 7.5/9 on tiebreak ahead of Axel Bachmann Schiavo. 2009 started with his initiation into the major events at Wijk aan Zee, where he was invited to play in the Corus Group C (2009). There he scored =4th with 7.5/13 behind Wesley So, Tiger Hillarp Persson and Anish Giri. David's introduction to supertournaments was as the bottom seed at the category 18 London Chess Classic (2009) where he was undefeated with 4/7 (+1 =6) to place =3rd behind the winner Magnus Carlsen, runner-up Vladimir Kramnik, alongside compatriot Michael Adams and ahead of Hikaru Nakamura, Nigel Short, Luke McShane and Ni Hua.

<2010-2011> David saw in 2010 by sharing first prize with Romain Edouard, Mark Hebden and Andrei Istratescu at the Hastings Chess Congress (2010) scoring 7/9. His success at the Corus C event in 2009 saw him invited to the Corus Group B (2010), where he scored a par-for-rating 6/13 to place =8th. In April 2010, he won the Southend Open outright with 6/7. 2010 finished with a mediocre 2/7 at the category London Chess Classic (2010), although he only lost 3 rating points highlighting that the event was the most powerful ever staged in Britain. 2011 started with =2nd at the Hastings Masters, scoring 6.5/9, half a point behind the winner Deep Sengupta. There followed =2nd behind Sergei Tiviakov at Leiden in July 2011 and he finished 2011 with 2/11 at the category 20 London Chess Classic (2011), again losing only a few rating points.

<2012-2014> Following a mediocre performance at the Hastings Masters tournament at the beginning of the year, Howell scored a strong 7/10 at the powerful Tradewise Gibraltar (2012), enough to place =7th. In May he was =1st alongside Vitaly Teterev with 6/7 in the Masters section of the 6th International Chess Festival staged in Wunsiedel in Germany. Two months later he won clear first at Leiden with 7.5/9. He started 2013 with another win at the Southend Open in March, scoring 6/7. There followed a series of championships and team events (see other sections) before he scored =2nd behind Nigel Short at the powerful PokerStars IoM Masters (2014) in October 2014.

<2015> The year started with =2nd behind Zhao Xue at the New Zealand Open. He placed outright second at the Tradewise Gibraltar (2015) with 8/10 (+6 =4), half a point behind the winner Hikaru Nakamura for one of the best performances of his career. He followed this in April with =1st from 7/9 at the Dubai Chess Open (2015) and in July 2015 with clear first place at Leiden in Netherlands, scoring an outstanding 8.5/9 (TPR of 2895) to propel him into the 2700 club for the first time.

Team Events (3)

<National representation> Howell represented England on board 3 at the U16 Olympiad staged in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) in 2002, his team placing 13th. He also represented his country at the Olympiad (2008) held in Dresden, Chess Olympiad (2010) in Khanty-Mansiysk, Chess Olympiad (2012) in Istanbul and Chess Olympiad (2014) in Tromsų, usually on board 4. During those Olympiads, he played 38 games for a percentage result of 65.8% (+18 =14 -6). He also represented England at the European Team Championship (2011) and European Team Championship (2013), playing board 3 in the former and reserve in the latter for a +2 =2 -7 result (27.3%).

<City> Howell played board 2 for London in the World Cities Team Championship (2012), his team placing 9th upon elimination in the Round of 16.

<National Leagues> David played in every 4NCL season from 2002 until 2013 inclusive. From 2002 to 2004 he played with the Slough Chess Club, and for the Guildford 2 team from 2005 to 2008 winning team silver in 2007 and 2008. He also played for the Guildford 1 team from 2006 to 2009 winning team silver, gold, gold and silver respectively. In 2010 and 2011 he played for the Pride and Prejudice team winning team silver and gold respectively, and in 2012 and 2013 he played for the Wood Green Hilsmark Kingfisher 1 team, winning gold and silver respectively.

He played in the French Top 16 League in 2006 (4), in the French Nationale I in the 2006-7 season and in the Catalan League in 2008. (5) He also played in the Greek Team Championship of 2009 (6) and the Dutch Team Championship in 2013. (7) He has played in the Bundesliga since the 2010-11 season (8) and is currently playing for the Trier team in the Bundesliga (2014/15). (9)

Rating and ranking history

Howell first cracked 2600 in January 2009 when he was 18, and has remained above that rating since, apart from a single rating period in November 2009 when he dipped below the 2600 by three points. His progress since then has been slow and steady, averaging a rating increase of about a point a month until he reached 2700 in August 2015 at the age of nearly 25. (10)

David first became one of the world's top 100 ranked players in April 2014. He dropped below #100 from June to August 2014, regaining his ranking in the top 100 in September 2014 where he has remained. (11)

Other (1)

In August 1999 at the age of eight, Howell became internationally famous when he broke the world record for the youngest player to have defeated a Grandmaster in an official game, when he defeated John Nunn at blitz chess. At the beginning of 2001, a few weeks after his 10th birthday, he became the youngest Briton to defeat a Grandmaster when he defeated Colin A McNab at the Hastings International 2000-01. In 2002, David had a draw in blitz against Vladimir Kramnik, becoming the youngest player ever to have scored against a reigning world chess champion in an official game.

References and sources

Note: the primary source of information in this bio was derived from the FIDE database, and is not explicitly footnoted except in those passages where it was necessary to distinguish the information it provided from other sources.

<Sources> (1) Biography:; (2) Wikipedia article: David Howell %28chess player%29; (3); (4); (5); (6); (7); (8); (9) [; (10); (11)

<References> David's chess blog has been at and Live rating:

Latest update: 7 August 2015

 page 1 of 31; games 1-25 of 766  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Kasparov vs D Howell 1-050 1998 BT Wireplay challengeA49 King's Indian, Fianchetto without c4
2. D Howell vs M Vachier-Lagrave 0-166 2000 Cap d'Agde mB30 Sicilian
3. M Vachier-Lagrave vs D Howell 1-026 2000 Wch U10C29 Vienna Gambit
4. M Vachier-Lagrave vs D Howell  1-055 2000 Cap d'Agde mC29 Vienna Gambit
5. M Vachier-Lagrave vs D Howell 0-134 2000 Cap d'Agde mC29 Vienna Gambit
6. D Howell vs M Vachier-Lagrave  1-039 2000 Cap d'Agde mB22 Sicilian, Alapin
7. D Howell vs M Vachier-Lagrave  0-149 2000 Cap d'Agde mB22 Sicilian, Alapin
8. M Vachier-Lagrave vs D Howell 1-054 2000 Cap d'Agde mC29 Vienna Gambit
9. M Vachier-Lagrave vs D Howell  1-039 2000 Cap d'Agde mC29 Vienna Gambit
10. D Howell vs M Vachier-Lagrave  ½-½30 2000 Cap d'Agde mB22 Sicilian, Alapin
11. D Howell vs M J Franklin  ½-½25 2001 Frome XII Congress opB22 Sicilian, Alapin
12. D Howell vs M Olszewski  1-061 2001 EYCC B12C02 French, Advance
13. D Howell vs P Marusenko  0-152 2001 10th Monarch AssuranceB06 Robatsch
14. D Howell vs A Samsonkin  ½-½43 2001 WYB12B03 Alekhine's Defense
15. Milos Osatovic vs D Howell  1-042 2001 EYCC B12D70 Neo-Grunfeld Defense
16. A Ormsby vs D Howell  0-124 2001 10th Monarch AssuranceC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
17. D Howell vs D Duskuzhanov 1-019 2001 WYB12C42 Petrov Defense
18. D Howell vs Emms  0-126 2001 4NCLB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
19. A Romashko vs D Howell  0-150 2001 EYCC B12C77 Ruy Lopez
20. D Howell vs R Van Kemenade  1-024 2001 10th Monarch AssuranceC42 Petrov Defense
21. O Martirosyan vs D Howell  0-178 2001 WYB12C68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
22. D Howell vs O Eminov  1-034 2001 EYCC B12B52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
23. D Howell vs J Turner 0-130 2001 Kidlington Congress-25C40 King's Knight Opening
24. D Howell vs Hebden  0-153 2001 10th Monarch AssuranceC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
25. T Coleman vs D Howell  ½-½53 2001 WYB12C49 Four Knights
 page 1 of 31; games 1-25 of 766  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Howell wins | Howell loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-14-13  JustAnotherPatzer: Many Happy Returns David and congratulations on winning the centenary 100th British Championship! May you go from strength to strength.
Premium Chessgames Member
  waustad: His outstanding result so far at Pokerstars Isle of Man International Chess Tournament 2014 will give him his personal highest rating, whatever happens tomorrow against Nigel Short. A draw would guarantee that he is equal first, though I don't know how the money is divided based on tiebreaks.
Premium Chessgames Member
  waustad: I thought of posting this on the tournament page, but it has gone off on some sort of poker rant. Even with his final round loss to GM Short, he would up equal 2-5. I didn't see any tiebreak method selected on the chess-results page, so they are probably just dividing the money. He picked up 8 elo giving him a personal best rating of 2665. Looking that up I found out that to say GM Howell is not enough information, since there is also James Clifford Howell
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < Once: Hmmm ... seems to be some confusion here. As a dyed in the wool Brit, let's see if I can help... Most people in the UK are educated in state schools. These cost nothing to attend - they are paid for by the state from general taxation. ...>

I already understood this. My father told me of this. He wasn't bitter about that as such although he didn't like the obvious or more obvious British class system, he, unlike me, was not very "socialistic": so he liked and disliked aspects of England.

The other contradiction or confusion is that rugby was played more by the "upper" classes whereas here in the "colonies" it is a working class (although here the myth is to perpetuate the idea that there are no classes which is nonsense, there are, but perhaps inter-personally kiwis are less obviously class minded in a negative sense, but that is moot).

So whereas soccer* was more or less a working class game in England it is or was considered here a game for "sissies". In fact Rugby League was (is?) played here more by working class people.

I am completely uninterested in most sports so I don't care, although I played soccer for a short time.

Interestingly chess is a game where "class" or what one's bank balance is is of little consequence. In my club I sometimes sat down to play players who were either millionaires or were CEO's of big companies, or I played people who were on Government "benefits". Regardless, this had no effect on my attitude to them or the way I played my game. I found "good" people of whatever economic or aristocratic "boast".

*Despite my disinterest, I refuse to call soccer anything other than soccer. I was brought up knowing about soccer. None of these new things or terms for me. Bring back crank shaft handles.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: In any case, David Howell, bless him, is playing here in the NZ Open (Championships) in Jan.

I doubt I will play him as he is at least 800 points above me! (And 43 years younger). I might fluke it though if I fluke rd 1 with a cheapo...then Fortune comes to my aid in rd can only dream.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: In the 3rd round of the New Zealand Open he's beaten FM Dusan Stojic.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I drew today Paul. Long game timewise but I cant see any real muck ups and we both basically played theory of the Scotch.

Playing my bette noire, Alan Fan, tommorrow...

Good to see you there today.

Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Richard> Long as you do not tell us that your opponent tomorrow is Bette Davis....
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <Richard> Good luck playing Allen Chi Zhou Fan today. He looks like a strong player for a 10 year old. Is he one of Ewen's pupils?
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Congrats to Howell on the upset today at Tradewise Gibraltar (2015). Tomorrow, he faces the man who is first in live ratings (from the US) and also first in the tournament, Nakamura with white. If he can <not> lose the game, Howell will past US #3 Gata Kamsky on the live ratings.

Wei Yi vs D Howell, 2015

Premium Chessgames Member
  kellmano: Second in Gibraltar has to be the highlight of his career so far. Well done David, time to kick on from here.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Congrats to David Howell on his performance. He finished in clear 2nd place with 8/10, half a point behind leader Nakamura. However, he entered the tournament as just the 15th seed, so 2nd is nothing to ashamed of.

His performance managed to gain him 18.7 rating points and rise 21 places on the live rankings.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Mating Net: On his way to the 2700 club where he'll be a fixture for years to come.
Feb-06-15  HeMateMe: Does he have a day job, or is he a full time chess professional, these days?
Feb-06-15  evlozare: A very good result for a nice young man. Several years back, he played against gmwesley so for a couple of games. They were about equal in their ratings then but he is behind gmwes now. Guess they were friends, or close acquaintances, whatever. Hope he continues his good games and maybe meet gmwes again in the near future.
Apr-09-15  JohnBoy: According to, DH just punctured the top 50. Dude should be 2700 shortly. Sweet!
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: He could peak above 2700 as soon as tomorrow (or rather, Saturday), if he beats Grandelius with black.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Congrats to David Howell for his performance at the Dubai Chess Open (2015). He scored 7/9 (+5,-0,=4), which is a 6-way tie for 1st, but was edged by Solak on tiebreaks. Howell was the 1st seed.

Like mentioned above, he could've peaked over 2700 with a win over Grandelius, but that game was a draw. He got a 2nd chance in the final round, but he would've had to beat 2nd seed Fedoseev with black. He came close, but ended up in a drawing trap.

Overall, he gained a decent 8.7 points to move from 2687 to 2696.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Howell finally surpasses 2700 on the live ratings.

Jul-20-15  fisayo123: Congratulations to him. He's improved quite a lot in the last 1-2 years.
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Howell is playing in Leiden. I caught today's game on chessdom vs Arghyadip Das after 17 moves.

click for larger view

Howell had 37 (!) seconds left to reach move 40, but Das chose 17...Nb3, when Howell was ready with 18 Ba3! Nc5 19 Qe3 Qa5 20 Bb2! Nca4 21 Bxg7 Rg8 22 Bd4 Rg4 23 Qg5 Rxd4 24 Nxd4 Bc3 25 Qg8+ Ke7 26 Rxb7+ 1-0

17...Ba6 was the only move not to lose outright, but even there White has 18 Ne5 Nxd5 19 Bd2 Bxd2 20 Qxd2 Nxc4 21 Nxc4 Bxc4 22 Rfc1 trapping the bishop. But probably the position is then a draw with Black having a pawn and knight for the Rook.

Crazy time management by Howell, but he is used to it, and his opponent may have tried too hard to exploit with tricky moves.

Premium Chessgames Member
  luzhin: Howell has just won Leiden with the amazing score of 8.5 out of 9 -- sending his live rating soaring well above 2700.
Aug-03-15  fisayo123: Adams over Howell for the London Chess Classic? I don't know about that. Howell deserves it more.
Nov-02-15  Avun Jahei: Howell won the world championship in circular chess when he was 12 (against amateurs). Not a big achievement, but worthy to mention it if just as curiosity.
Nov-02-15  starry2013: fisayo123: <Adams over Howell for the London Chess Classic? I don't know about that. Howell deserves it more.>

It's very normal that the top rated local player gets an invite for a tournament. Maybe they could have invited two local players, but now it's part of this 'chess tour' thing maybe that wouldn't fit in.

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