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Reti 
 
Richard Reti
Number of games in database: 613
Years covered: 1907 to 1929
Overall record: +255 -169 =160 (57.4%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      29 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (39) 
    C86 C77 C64 C88 C68
 English (35) 
    A13 A15 A12 A14 A10
 French Defense (27) 
    C13 C12 C10 C01 C00
 Orthodox Defense (26) 
    D63 D64 D60 D68 D55
 French (21) 
    C12 C13 C10 C00 C11
 King's Gambit Declined (17) 
    C30 C31 C32
With the Black pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (40) 
    C77 C66 C68 C67 C63
 Queen's Pawn Game (28) 
    A46 A50 D00 A40 D02
 French Defense (24) 
    C12 C11 C01 C10 C14
 French (17) 
    C12 C11 C10 C00 C13
 Alekhine's Defense (15) 
    B02 B05 B03
 Caro-Kann (13) 
    B10 B13 B15 B18 B12
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Reti vs Tartakower, 1910 1-0
   Reti vs Bogoljubov, 1924 1-0
   Reti vs Capablanca, 1924 1-0
   Euwe vs Reti, 1920 0-1
   Reti vs Euwe, 1920 1-0
   Reti vs Rubinstein, 1923 1-0
   Alekhine vs Reti, 1922 1/2-1/2
   Reti vs P Romanovsky, 1925 1-0
   Reti vs Yates, 1924 1-0
   Bogoljubov vs Reti, 1923 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Gothenburg (1920)
   Vienna (1923)
   Maehrisch - Ostrau (1923)
   Abbazia (1912)
   Karlsbad (1923)
   Baden-bei-Wien (1914)
   Bad Pistyan (1922)
   Marienbad (1925)
   New York (1924)
   London (1922)
   Mannheim (1914)
   Moscow (1925)
   Vienna (1922)
   Semmering (1926)
   Baden-Baden (1925)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 1920-1939 (Part 2) by Anatoly21
   Richard Réti's Best Games by Golombek by suenteus po 147
   Reti's Best Games of Chess by matey
   Richard Reti @ the 1924 New York International by ruylopez900
   New York 1924 by Benzol
   june.lorena's favorite games by june.lorena
   London 1922 by Benzol
   Marienbad 1925 by suenteus po 147
   Abbazia 1912 by sneaky pete
   Vienna 1922 by Archives
   Teplitz-Schönau 1922 by suenteus po 147
   Gothenburg 1920 by Tabanus
   Mil y Una Partidas 1914-1931 by K9Empress

GAMES ANNOTATED BY RETI: [what is this?]
   Breyer vs J Esser, 1917
   Alekhine vs Fahrni, 1914
   Breyer vs K Havasi, 1918

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Richard Reti
Search Google for Richard Reti


RICHARD RETI
(born May-28-1889, died Jun-06-1929, 40 years old) Czech Republic
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]
Richard Réti was born in 1889 in Bösing (now Pezinok, Slovakia) which at the time was in the Hungarian part of Austria-Hungary.

Early career

At the age of 12, he had already submitted a chess problem to the chess column in Über Land und Meer run by Hermann von Gottschall. Von Gottschall advised him to continue working on his chess. In 1903, the then 13-year old Réti was introduced to Carl Schlechter who remarked "for his age, this is certainly exceptional".(RR) He went on to fare well at the 2nd Hungarian National tournament in Székesfehérvár, 1907.(Edo) Réti's interest in chess was dampered following some disappointing tournament results, although he won smaller events in Vienna 1909 and, in 1910 the 2nd Trebitsch Memorial.(Edo) His main interest became then mathematics and, to some extent, physics. He was about to finish his doctorate when World War I broke out. Réti was assigned to clerical work due to his "somewhat weak constitution".(RR)

A turn of life

In 1918, he won the strong Kaschau (Košice) tournament. But he still viewed chess mostly as a hobby. He had planned to finish his doctorate in mathematics at the University of Vienna. He carried his doctoral thesis around in a small booklet, which he lost and never recovered it. This drove him near suicide as he later confided to his older brother Rudolph.(RR) At that time, Richard received an invitation to go to the Netherlands as a Chess Master in Residence. He accepted the invitation and decided to pursue a chess career, instead of becoming a scholar. About this decision, Rudolph said "It haunted him throughout his life, and he never found a definite answer to it."(RR)

Tournament successes

Réti won 1st prize in the strong Gothenburg (1920) tournament. He confirmed his status as one of the top players in the world during the early 20th century by winning Teplitz-Schönau 1922.(TS) He came in 2nd at Maehrisch - Ostrau (1923) and Vienna (1923). Réti also won the Dr. Körner tournament (Hakoah, Vienna) in 1928.(WSZ28).

Theory and Practice

He worked to found hypermodernism, along with Aron Nimzowitsch and Savielly Tartakower. The Réti Opening (1.Nf3 d5 2.c4) has become a staple of grandmaster play. With this opening system, Réti famously defeated the, then reigning, world champion in Reti vs Capablanca, 1924 in New York (1924), the Cuban's first loss in eight years and first as world champion. Réti authored two books, Modern Ideas In Chess (Die neuen Ideen im Schachspiel, 1922) in 1923 and Masters Of The Chess Board (Die Meister des Schachbretts, 1930), published posthumously in 1933.

Study composition

Réti also composed numerous endgame studies, the most famous of which was a 1921 study that illustrated a beautiful method of drawing what may seem to be a hopeless king and pawn ending. White to play and draw:


click for larger view

Réti died from scarlet fever a week after turning forty.

Sources

(RR) Rudolph Réti in Edward Winter's "The Réti Brothers", http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

(Edo) Rod Edwards, http://www.edochess.ca/players/p217...

(TS) Game Collection: Teplitz-Schönau 1922

(WSZ28) "Wiener Schachzeitung", March 1928, pages 81-82. Provided in "ANNO / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek"


 page 1 of 25; games 1-25 of 613  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Reti vs Z Barasz 1-061 1907 SzekesfehervarD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
2. Reti vs E Cohn  0-149 1908 ViennaC49 Four Knights
3. Reti vs Spielmann 0-136 1908 ViennaC86 Ruy Lopez, Worrall Attack
4. Swiderski vs Reti 1-032 1908 ViennaA84 Dutch
5. Alapin vs Reti 1-063 1908 ViennaC86 Ruy Lopez, Worrall Attack
6. Mieses vs Reti 1-025 1908 ViennaC27 Vienna Game
7. Reti vs P F Johner  0-134 1908 ViennaD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
8. Reti vs Lasker 0-115 1908 Vienna (Austria)C56 Two Knights
9. Tartakower vs Reti 1-034 1908 ViennaB38 Sicilian, Accelerated Fianchetto, Maroczy Bind, 6.Be3
10. Reti vs Leonhardt ½-½53 1908 ViennaC26 Vienna
11. Reti vs J Perlis  0-136 1908 ViennaD32 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
12. Reti vs Duras ½-½31 1908 ViennaB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
13. Rubinstein vs Reti 1-016 1908 ViennaD00 Queen's Pawn Game
14. Reti vs Teichmann 0-134 1908 ViennaC49 Four Knights
15. Marshall vs Reti 1-031 1908 ViennaC49 Four Knights
16. Von Bardeleben vs Reti 1-030 1908 ViennaC77 Ruy Lopez
17. Reti vs Maroczy 0-154 1908 ViennaB22 Sicilian, Alapin
18. J N Berger vs Reti  1-026 1908 ViennaD05 Queen's Pawn Game
19. Reti vs H Suechting  ½-½17 1908 ViennaB01 Scandinavian
20. Schlechter vs Reti 1-047 1908 ViennaC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
21. Salwe vs Reti 1-031 1908 ViennaD00 Queen's Pawn Game
22. Reti vs O Strobl 1-027 1909 Trebitsch MemorialC66 Ruy Lopez
23. J Krejcik vs Reti 0-131 1909 ViennaC26 Vienna
24. L Loewy Jr vs Reti 1-033 1909 Trebitsch MemorialC66 Ruy Lopez
25. L Loewy Jr vs Reti ½-½50 1909 Winter Tt 1908/09C45 Scotch Game
 page 1 of 25; games 1-25 of 613  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Reti wins | Reti loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-08-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Simul and Bilndfold exhibitions after the Budapest tournament (moved to Düsseldorf of late):

Simuls:

Kaiserslautern: +22 -2 =7
Saarlouis: +28 -0 =1
Velbert: +19 -1 =0
Speyer: +19 -2 =2
Zweibrücken: +18 -1 =1
Pirmasens: +25 -0 =2
Landau: +34 -1 =1
Düsseldorf: +12 -3 =1

Overall: +177 -10 =15

Blindfold:

Luxemburg: +9 -0 =1
Betzdorf: +9 -3 =4
Kaiserslautern: +6 -1 =3
Frankfurt: +5 -3 =2

Overall: +29 -7 =10

In Frankfurt he was facing solely Main tournament players (<Hauptturnierspieler>)

From page 362 of the November-December 1926 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Oct-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Preßburg (today Bratislava), Master Tournament of the IX. Congress of the Czechoslovakian Chess Association, 1925:

1. Reti +9 out of 10
2. Engel 6.5
3-5. Pokorny 5.5
3-5. Schulz 5.5
3-5. Teller 5.5
6-7. Haida 5.0
6-7. Walter sen. 5.0

etc.

Source: Page 278 of the September 1925 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Oct-19-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: <Prag, 6. Juni

Schachmeister Richard Réti ist heute um halb 6 Uhr früh im Liebener Krankenhaus nach dreiwöchigem Krankenlager an Scharlach gestorben.>

(Prague, June 6

Chessmaster Richard Réti died today at 05.30 am in the Libeň hospital after 3 weeks sick bed of scarlet fever.)

Source: Page 161 of the June 1929 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Oct-31-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Some anecdotes about blindfold play from
From page 109 of the April 1924 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung' (originally from the '8-Uhr-Blatt' and as the WSZ presumes that Reti was the author, I post them here):

1) A chessmaster gives a 10-board blindfold Simul in a provincial town. Before the Simul starts, one spectator is especially enthusiastic about it. He has little knowledge of chess but is very interested in blindfold play as he cannot even grasp how it's possible. During the Simul, he turns to his neighbour, claiming that it wasn't so difficult. As he is met with a lack of understanding, he elaborates: "They still tell him all the moves of his opponents."

2) The author (possibly Reti) once played a blindfold Simul where he sacrificed his bishop in one of the games. The mediator who had to execute his moves on the boards thought that this was an oversight and, in order to help the author, he moved the bishop elsewhere. After a few moves, total confusion arose as both players played different positions. After the Simul, the mediator apologised, explaining that he had seen so many examples of the author's amazing gift that he thought he would soon recognize where he had moved the bishop.

3) The mediator in a blindfold Simul Alekhine gave in Brussels was an editor. One of his colleagues was among the spectators. When the Simul was over, he asked the mediator "now that we journalists are among ourselves, tell me but what the deception is?"

Nov-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: On June 19, 1924, Reti gave a 45-board Simul in Mönchengladbach, Germany and scored +37 -6 =2.

He was in Vienna at that time (July 1924) and would then travel to Argentina for some months to work there as a chess teacher (the Argentinean Chess Federation had invited him).

From page 204 of the July 1924 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Nov-25-13  Penguincw: K Quote of the Day K

< "It is a profound mistake to imagine that the art of combination depends only on natural talent, and that it cannot be learned." >

-Reti

Dec-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: <Wien. Einen bedauernstwerten Unfall erlitt kürzlich Grossmeister Reti, der ihn wohl viele Wochen ans Bett fesseln dürfte. Er zog sich bei einem Sturz einen Oberschenkelbruch zu und liegt derzeit auf der Unfallstation Professor Hochenegg im Allgemeinen Krankenhaus.> (Vienna. Grandmaster Reti suffered a pitiable accident of late, which will probably chain him to the bed for many weeks. He fell and broke his femur and currently rests in the ambulance station Professor Hochenegg in the General Hospital.)

From page 239 of the September 1923 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Dec-14-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: A new Chess Club was founded in Vienna, at the beginning of April 1916, by the name of <Wiener Schachgesellschaft> (Vienna Chess Association). The Club resided in the "Dom-Cafe", Wien I., Singerstraße 10.

The Management:

Chairman: Richard Böhler

Treasurer: Hans Hein

Secretary: Richard Reti

Commitee Members: Siegrfied A. Wolf and Luzatto.

Source: Page 60 of the March-April 1916 'Wiener Schachzeitung'

Jan-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: 15-board Blindfold Simul on February 14, 1913, in the <Wiener Akademischen Schachverein>, which lasted 4.5 hours and the score was +5 -4 =6.

Source: Page 72 of the March-April 1913 'Wiener Schachzeitung'

Jan-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: 5-board blindfold on January 25, 1913, in the Landstraßer Schachbund Chess Club (III/2, Radetzkyplatz 3, Cafe Hungaria) ended after about 3 hours with a 3.5:1.5 win for Reti.

Source: Page 158 of the May-June 1913 'Wiener Schachzeitung'

Jan-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Blindfold Simul on December 4, 1912, in the Vienna Chess Club against 8 opponents, which lasted 3 hours. Reti scored +5 -2 =1.

Reti lost to Ernst Grünfeld (!) and Adam Zuk Ritter von Skarszewski and drew Rudolf Reitler.*

Source: Page 348 of the November-December 1912 'Wiener Schachzeitung'

* Reitler was incorrectly called Robert and the mistake corrected to Rudolf on page 386 of the 1912 'Wiener Schachzeitung' Supplementheft.

Feb-22-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: 6-board blindfold Simul on November 15, 1909, in the Vienna Chess Club. Reti scored +1 -3 =2 against strong opposition:

Winners: Prof. H. Soyka, Otto Sternberg, Robert Bacca

Draws: Nikolaus Baron Döry von Jobahaza, Otto Strobel

Source: 'Wiener Schachzeitung', April-May 1910, p. 146

Feb-28-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Has anybody heard of a match between Reti and the Dutch player/problemist Henri Weenink?

Supposedly a 5 game match between the two took place in 1928.

Any references would be appreciated.

Feb-28-14  thomastonk: <zanzibar> There has been a ten game match Reti vs Weenink that was played from early November 1927 until the end of January 1928. Reti won with 6.5 :3.5. Two years ago I collected all the games, dates, conditions etc from newspaper reports (approx 25 sources). So, you can ask questions.

Only one of the games (the 9th) is contained in Weenink's biography, and right now I cannot find Reti's biography by Kalendovsky.

However, the match is not unknown, see for example Feenstra Kuiper's "Hundert Jahre Schachzweikämpfe", Amsterdam 1967, p 54.

Mar-02-14  RedShield: Winter's C.N. 1211 appealed unsuccessfully for more information on a drawn simul game between Capablanca and the 22 year-old Reti that occurred on 21st October 1911 in Vienna, as reported in the May-June 1912 <Wiener Schachzeitung>. Capa could 'only' score +22 -5 =8.
Mar-04-14  thomastonk: <zanzibar> Addendum: Kalendovský published only one game between Réti and Weenink, the 1st match game.
Mar-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: Thank you kindly for the info <thomastonk>. (Sorry for the delay in replying).

I found 13 Reti-Weenink games on ChessTempo (CT). It's curious, nine are listed from 1928, one from 1920, and two from 1919. Here's a breakdown:

N . Date .... Event ................. Rounds

6 - 1928 .... Amsterdam m ...... 1,3,4,5,8,9
1 - 1928 .... Amsterdam m/6 .... ?
1 - 1928 .... Amsterdam VAS .... ?
1 - 1928 .... Amsterdam NED .... ?
1 - 1923 .... Scheveningen ...... 7
1 - 1920 .... Amsterdam .......... 4
1 - 1919 .... Amsterdam NED .... ?
1 - 1919 .... Rotterdam NED ..... -

I think the entire 1928 Amsterdam match is there somehow, but need help disentangling the confusion. I wonder about the early dates too.

Any more help would be appreciated (I'm also curious how the match was organized and sponsored).

The CT site's database is here:

http://chesstempo.com/game-database...

There's no direct link, but a "Quick Search" on "Reti, Richard Weenink" puts up the games.

Cheers.

Mar-13-14  thomastonk: Hello, <zanzibar>!

<I think the entire 1928 Amsterdam match is there somehow,...> Why do you think so?

In fact, games 7 and 10 are missing. In other words: 8 games are there, one probably incomplete. The remaining 5 games belong to different events, which I've also collected two years back.

<I'm also curious how the match was organized and sponsored.> May I ask you what you are going to do with this information? A serious answer would take a lot of time.

Mar-13-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  zanzibar: I'm approaching the topic with the curiosity and naivety of a student. The fact of the matter is that I have a collection of interesting tactical problems - whose origins I'm attempting to determine.

In the course of this investigative work I've become interested in various historical events. Additionally, I've also become interested in the representation, preservation and accuracy of the "chess record".

That means I'm exploring various big databases, both online (e.g. chessgames.com, 365chess.com, chesstempo.com) and downloadable (e.g. ICOfY, MillBase, RUSbase, etc.).

I have one position from the 1928 Reti-Weenink match in my tactical DB. That led me to learn about Weenink, and gladly, since I hadn't been aware of him beforehand.

Then, since Reti is such a seminal figure, I thought every one of his games against other masters must be online. Should be a simple matter, right? Right!?

But I discovered that, other than the implicit mention in CT collection, your forum post is the only mention of the match that I've seen on the net. Basically, it was generally unknown (even to Wikipedia!).

(A similar match that I've discovered, although not so unknown, is that between Pillsbury and H.N. Stone, won 5-2 by Pillsbury in 1890, in Boston. Pillsbury was just 18, and had only learned the game two years before:

http://books.google.com/books?id=tL...

I intend a trip to Pillsbury's hometown to see if I can locate a record of these games in their reference library. Otherwise I haven't been able to locate anything on the net)

As to the 1928 Reti match, I wonder why the entire match isn't available? I'm also curious as to why the games aren't duplicated in other collections besides chesstempo's (CT).

My hunch that the missing match games might be miscategorized on CT was because I found only one game from Amsterdam NED 1928 tournament listed - and so I assumed (apparently incorrectly) that it might belong to the match. I should perhaps be more careful, but I did qualify my supposition.

All my investigations are somewhat haphazard at the moment - guided by the collection of tactical problems I'm working from. I don't have an agenda, or a true passion guiding me, other than a respect for the game and the players.

But I can turn the question around, I suppose, and ask why you did so much work yourself not so long ago? Did you intend on publishing it in a book or article? Have you?

It seems to me that it's important enough to do so, and that you've invested a fair amount of time in doing the research to ensure accuracy.

Mar-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: < thomastonk: <zanzibar> There has been a ten game match Reti vs Weenink that was played from early November 1927 until the end of January 1928. Reti won with 6.5 :3.5. Two years ago I collected all the games, dates, conditions etc from newspaper reports (approx 25 sources). So, you can ask questions.

Only one of the games (the 9th) is contained in Weenink's biography, and right now I cannot find Reti's biography by Kalendovsky. ...>

Kalendovsky's monograph gives the result of the match as +5 -2 =3 in favor of Reti. Kalendovsky also includes the first game of the match -- a thematic good-white-knight vs. bad-black-bishop endgame from French defense. In the endgame, Reti, commanding the white side, fairly instructively grinds down Weenink; the score is given without comments though.

Mar-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Karpova: ... (Vienna. Grandmaster Reti suffered a pitiable accident of late, which will probably chain him to the bed for many weeks. He fell and broke his femur and currently rests in the ambulance station Professor Hochenegg in the General Hospital.)>

According to Kalendovsky, Reti was hit by a distracted Viennese motorist.

Indeed, Reti was out of commission a couple of months, returning to tournament play only in November to play in Schlechter Memorial, Vienna 1923. (1. Tartakower 9, 2. Reti 8.5, 3. Spielmann 7.5, 4-5. Gruenfeld and L. Steiner 7, ...)

Mar-15-14  thomastonk: <zanzibar> Thanks for the exhaustive answer.

Before I turn to the match, I would like to write a few words on 'known' and 'unknown'. The online databases you mentioned do not represent what is known. They are only collections, and they are full of mistakes, too (and I don't talk about the moves ;-)).

You wrote <(even to Wikipedia!)>. That's funny. Wikipedia is - according to the leading official in my country - a good starting point for a research. For chess history it is often a bad starting point.

There are well researched books on tournaments and matches, and there the match Réti vs Weenink is listed, of course. But, like many other matches, it is not an important one. Weenink is unknown to most chess players nowadays, though his results at his peak were quite respectable.

The match was arranged by the VAS (Vereenigd Amsterdamsch Schaakgenootschap), then one of the two leading clubs in Amsterdam. The winner should be the first who reached 6.5 points, and some newspapers added that thereby the match would have between 7 and 13 games. You may draw your own conclusions, whether this means that a draw was possible. I've not seen a prize to be mentioned; the Dutch were quite discreet, I would say.

The games were first played weekly, i.e. November 9, 16, 23 and 30. Only the 5th game was played in December 1927, and all other games in January 1928.

The draw in 44 moves, which is denoted by "VAS" in the CT database, does not belong to that match.

The missing seventh game appeared already on January 9, 1928 in the newspapers, but here you have it with Weenink's comments: http://resolver.kb.nl/resolve?urn=d....

Here you'll find the missing 10th game, and Weenink's summary of the match: http://resolver.kb.nl/resolve?urn=d....

Also for <Gypsy>: from private communication I know that Kalendovsky knew all games of the match, and when he wrote his book the search was horrible time consuming. I think, he didn't found the second part of game 5, which is also not present in the CT database. But it is here: http://resolver.kb.nl/resolve?urn=d....

My research is completely based on this Dutch newspaper database, and hence everybody can do the same. Further details can possibly be found in the "Tijdschrift", the Dutch chess journal for the members of the chess association, which reported in 1928 about the match. I don't have access to this one.

Apr-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Very interesting Chess Note 8629, wherein Avital Pilpel (Haifa, Israel) reports of Alon Schab's finding of Reti's birth record. According to Pilpel, it appears that Reti's full name was <Richard Selig Réti>.

Link: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Apr-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Reti won the unusual double round robin Winter tournament 1908/09 of the Vienna Chess Club. The first leg lasted until the end of January 1909, the second leg on February 20th, 1909. Apparently, the results of the two legs alone, together with the final result were awarded with prizes.

1st leg:

1. R Reti 4.0
2-3. L Löwy 3.0
2-3. J Schenkein 3.0
4-5. P Meitner 2.0
4-5. A Albin 2.0
6. J Krejcik 1.0

2nd leg:

1. A Albin 4.0
2. R Reti 3.5
3-4. P Meitner 2.5
3-4. L Löwy 2.5
5. J Krejcik 1.5
6. Schenkein 1.0

Overall:

1. R Reti 7.0
2. A Albin 6.0
3. L Löwy 5.5
4. P Meitner 4.5
5. J Schenkein 4.0
6. J Krejcik 2.5

Source: 'Wiener Schachzeitung', June 1909, pp. 172-173

Apr-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: Double round robin Club Tournament of the Vienna Amateur Chess Club, which ended in March 1909 (it lasted 3 months).

1. R Reti 13.5
2. O Strobl 12.5
3. K Schuster 11.0
4-5. Berger 8.0
4-5. Tschinkel 8.0
6. Guttmann 6.5
7. Steiner 6.0
8. Soyka 5.0
9. Kravani 1.5

Reti with a dominating performance, scoring +13 -2 =1, conceding 1 draw against Guttmann and, curiously, losing both games to Tschinkel.

In the <Nebenturnier> with 8 players, Mautner and Haim shared 1st to 2nd prize, Meyersberg got 3rd prize.

Source: 'Wiener Schachzeitung', June 1909, pp. 175-176

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