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Mackenzie 
 
George Henry Mackenzie
Number of games in database: 306
Years covered: 1857 to 1893
Overall record: +161 -66 =70 (66.0%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      9 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (42) 
    C77 C70 C67 C84 C65
 French Defense (29) 
    C01 C02 C11 C00 C14
 French (12) 
    C11 C00 C13 C10
 Vienna Opening (10) 
    C29 C25 C26 C28
 English (9) 
    A13 A10
 Sicilian (8) 
    B23 B27 B73 B45 B46
With the Black pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (33) 
    C77 C65 C80 C67 C69
 Giuoco Piano (13) 
    C50 C53 C54
 Sicilian (11) 
    B45 B46 B23 B20 B72
 Scotch Game (10) 
    C45
 Four Knights (8) 
    C49 C48
 Evans Gambit (8) 
    C51 C52
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Blackburne vs Mackenzie, 1882 0-1
   D S Thompson vs Mackenzie, 1868 0-1
   Mackenzie vs J Mason, 1878 1-0
   Mackenzie vs F Perrin, 1868 1-0
   Mackenzie vs J Mason, 1882 1/2-1/2
   Bird vs Mackenzie, 1883 1/2-1/2
   Mackenzie vs Tarrasch, 1885 1-0
   Mackenzie vs Steinitz, 1883 1-0
   Mackenzie vs G Hammond, 1857 1-0
   Burn vs Mackenzie, 1886 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63 (1862)
   2nd American Chess Congress (1871)
   3rd American Chess Congress (1874)
   Paris (1878)
   5th American Chess Congress (1880)
   Vienna (1882)
   London (1883)
   Hamburg (1885)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   London 1883 by suenteus po 147
   Vienna 1882 by suenteus po 147
   Paris 1878 by suenteus po 147
   New York 1880 by suenteus po 147
   Cleveland 1871 by crawfb5
   Hey, Mackenzie!! by Knight13
   1886 Mackenzie - Lipschutz Match by TheFocus
   Chicago 1874 by suenteus po 147
   MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63 (1862) by Chessical
   1886 Burn - Mackenzie Match by TheFocus

GAMES ANNOTATED BY MACKENZIE: [what is this?]
   D Starbuck vs M Judd, 1881

Search Sacrifice Explorer for George Henry Mackenzie
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GEORGE HENRY MACKENZIE
(born Mar-24-1837, died Apr-14-1891) United Kingdom (citizen of United States of America)

[what is this?]
George Henry Mackenzie was born in North Kessock, Scotland. He won the 1st place prize of every American tournament he entered (13 tournaments and 7 matches).

In 1861, Mackenzie resigned his army commission in the British King's Royal Rifle Corps in 1861 to become a professional chess player. In 1862, he won a handicap tournament in London, defeating Adolf Anderssen. In 1862, he defeated George Alcock MacDonnell in a match in Dublin, Ireland (+6-3=1). In 1863 he emigrated to the United States and enlisted in the Union Army. After 15 weeks as a private, he earned the rank of Captain in charge of a Black regiment. Mackenzie later deserted and was discharged from the Union Army. In 1864 he rejoined the Army and fought with distinction in three battles. However, he was arrested again on the previous desertion charges and imprisoned. He was released in May, 1865 where he moved to New York and started playing chess, a true symbol of disarmament.

In 1866, Mackenzie defeated Gustavus Charles Reichhelm in New York in a match (+5-0=1) http://www.chessarch.com/archive/18.... By April, he was reporting news about Washington Square and the NYU chess activity to the New York Albion. The year following, Mackenzie again defeated Reichhelm in Philadelphia (+7-0=2) for the title of U.S. Chess Champion. He and Charles Henry Stanley (the founding columnist of the New York Albion until 1856, when Mackenzie revived it) met for a match in 1868. In 1869 at New York he won 82 games and lost 8 in the longest master tournament ever held (48 players and double round robin), winning the event.

The New York Turf, Field & Farm approached him in 1870 to edit a chess column for 8 years. In 1871, he won the 2nd American Chess Congress http://graeme.50webs.com/chesschamp..., held in Cleveland, Ohio, scoring 14 points and earning $100 for 1st prize. In 1874, he won the 3rd American Chess Congress http://graeme.50webs.com/chesschamp..., held in Chicago (+8-1=1). In August 1876, he won the Café International Tournament in New York (+23-5=2). In 1878, he took 4th place at the Paris International Tournament.

The next decade saw him take 1st place at the 5th American Chess Congress http://graeme.50webs.com/chesschamp... in New York (+11-2=5) defeating James Glover Grundy in the decisive match of 1880. In 1881, he defeated Max Judd in a match in St. Louis (+7-5=1). In 1882, he took 4th-5th at Vienna. At Vienna, he drew with Wilhelm Steinitz, breaking Steinitz's 25 game winning streak. In 1882, he lost a match against James Mason in London (+0-1=2), then won a match against Joseph Henry Blackburne (+2-1=0). In 1883, he took 3rd in the 5th Manhattan Chess Club Championship, won by Gustave Simonson. In 1883, he lost a match to Wilhelm Steinitz in New York (+1-3=2). In 1885, he took 4th in the 20th British Counties Chess Association Congress in Hereford, England. In 1885, he took 4th in the 7th Manhattan Chess Club Championship. In 1886, he defeated Samuel Lipschutz in a match http://graeme.50webs.com/chesschamp... in New York (+5-3=5). In 1886, he tied for 2nd-3rd in the 9th Manhattan Chess Club Championship. In 1886, he drew a match with Amos Burn (+4-4=2). In 1887 he won the 5th German Chess Championship in Frankfurt (+13-3=4) http://xoomer.virgilio.it/cserica/s.... He, thus, became the first American chess player to win an international event. In 1888 he won the 5th Scottish Chess Championship in Glasgow (+4-0=2)http://www.thechesslibrary.com/file.... In 1888, he took 2nd in the 4th British Chess Federation Championship, held in Bradford, England. The event was won by Isidor Gunsberg. In 1888, he defeated Celso Golmayo Zupide in a match (7.5-4.5) in Havana. In 1890, he took 3rd-4th in the 6th British Chess Federation Congress, held in Manchester England (Siegbert Tarrasch won).

Tactical bright as his contemporaries, he had a high positional understanding that approached Steinitz, but more dynamic. When Mackenzie was beginning to get first prizes outside the U.S.A., the disease forced him to move away the games (can not compete in New York, 1889) and did not take long to kill him. He died of tuberculosis in a New York hotel on April 14, 1891 at the age of 54. He was inducted in the U.S. Hall of Fame in 1992.

Wikipedia article: George Henry Mackenzie


 page 1 of 13; games 1-25 of 306  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Mackenzie vs G Hammond 1-022 1857 USAC42 Petrov Defense
2. Mackenzie vs Mohishunder 1-024 1857 InformalC51 Evans Gambit
3. S Boden vs Mackenzie 1-023 1860 Albion 66C55 Two Knights Defense
4. Paulsen vs Mackenzie  1-025 1861 London Blindfold SimC51 Evans Gambit
5. G MacDonnell vs Mackenzie ½-½37 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63A10 English
6. Mackenzie vs G Medley  1-031 1862 LondonC42 Petrov Defense
7. Mackenzie vs G MacDonnell 0-164 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C41 Philidor Defense
8. Mackenzie vs G MacDonnell 1-048 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63B06 Robatsch
9. Mackenzie vs G Medley 1-031 1862 LondonB06 Robatsch
10. Paulsen vs Mackenzie 1-025 1862 London (England)C51 Evans Gambit
11. G MacDonnell vs Mackenzie 0-128 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C42 Petrov Defense
12. S Solomons vs Mackenzie  0-133 1862 LondonA10 English
13. G MacDonnell vs Mackenzie 0-127 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C01 French, Exchange
14. Mackenzie vs F Deacon  1-044 1862 LondonB27 Sicilian
15. Mackenzie vs Paulsen 1-023 1862 London (England)C51 Evans Gambit
16. Mackenzie vs G MacDonnell 1-047 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C41 Philidor Defense
17. S Solomons vs Mackenzie  1-029 1862 LondonA13 English
18. Mackenzie vs Paulsen 0-120 1862 London m/1C39 King's Gambit Accepted
19. Mackenzie vs G MacDonnell 1-047 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C41 Philidor Defense
20. Cole vs Mackenzie  0-149 1862 LondonC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
21. G MacDonnell vs Mackenzie 1-049 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C50 Giuoco Piano
22. Mackenzie vs G Medley 0-142 1862 LondonC01 French, Exchange
23. G MacDonnell vs Mackenzie 1-047 1862 MacDonnell - Mackenzie 1862/63C50 Giuoco Piano
24. Cole vs Mackenzie  0-127 1862 LondonC42 Petrov Defense
25. Paulsen vs Mackenzie  1-025 1863 LondonC55 Two Knights Defense
 page 1 of 13; games 1-25 of 306  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Mackenzie wins | Mackenzie loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: In his column in the <Albion> for June 9, 1866, George Henry Mackenzie printed two games he had played "a few years ago" against Boden. I assume they were probably played in the early 1860s before Mackenzie went to the United States in 1863.

I want to submit the games, but would like to have more information on the exact place (London?) and date. Does anybody have a clue?

Here is Mackenzie's win:

Mackenzie, George Mackenzie - Boden, Samuel Standidge [Albion, 1866.06.09]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0-0 Nf6 5.d4 Bxd4 6.Nxd4 Nxd4 7.f4 Nc6 8.Bxf7+ Kxf7 9.fxe5 Nxe5 10.Qh5+ Ng6 11.e5 Rf8 12.exf6 Kg8 13.Qd5+ Kh8 14.fxg7+ Kxg7 15.Rxf8 Qxf8 16.Be3 Qf7 17.Bh6+ Kg8 18.Nc3 c6 19.Qd4 d5 20.Rf1 Qe7 21.Ne2 Bd7 22.Ng3 Qe5 23.Qf2 Be6 24.Re1 Qd6 25.Qf6 1-0

(The actual column can be found by going to http://www.chessarch.com/excavation... and clicking on the link for the June 9, 1866 issue.)

Mar-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: Happy Birthday master Mackenzie!
Mar-24-12  Penguincw: R.I.P. POTD.
Jan-30-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  jnpope: <Phony Benoni: Does anybody have a clue?>

Mackenzie was playing Boden in 1861 (see Chess Player's Chronicle, 1861.09, v3, No. 9, p282-283), so I suspect these games are from around that same time period, I don't have anything more at the moment, but I'll check a few more sources and see what I can come up with.

Jan-31-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  thomastonk: From the biography: "In 1862, he won a handicap tournament in London, defeating Adolf Anderssen." In his personal encounter he beat Anderssen 2-0 receiving pawn and move odds. I consulted four databases, but eventually I had to look at Schachzeitung 1862, p.273-274 to see the games. Pretty bad ones because of Anderssen's play.

This handicap tournament is clearly short of the grand tournament London 1862, see Game Collection: London 1862, and some matches which all have been played around the same time. The 24 participants of the handicap tournament were divided into 5 groups. Group 1 consisted of Anderssen and Löwenthal, group 2 of Blackburne, Falkbeer, Deacon and Medley, group 3 of Hannah, Green, Lord Cremone and Mackenzie and so on. The odds were determined by the difference of groups: move, pawn and move, pawn and two moves and knight.

Mackenzie won the tournament and Anderssen became third.

May-08-13  Graham1973: I'm currently converting a Living Chess game between Mackenzie and Delmar I found in the St Louis Globe-Democrat.

See:

http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

The moves are as follows:

1.P-K4 P-K4
2.Kt-KB3 Kt-QB3
3.KB-QB4 KB-QB4
4.P-QKt4 BxP
5.P-QB3 B-R4
6.P-Q4 PxP
7.O-O PxQBP
8.Q-QKt3 Q-KB3
9.P-K5 Q-KKt3
10.QKtxP KKt-K2
11.B-QR3 O-O
12.Qkt-Q5 KtxKt
13.BxKt P-Q3
14.PxP PxP
15.QR-Q B-B2
16.KR-K Kt-Q
17.KR-K7 Kt-K3
18.BxKt BxB
19.QxQKtP B-QKt3
20.BxQP B-KR6
21.Kt-K5 BxKBP
22.KxB Q-QB7
23.K-Kt3 QxR
24.RxKBP B-BKB4
25.RxKtP K-R
26.Kt-KKt6 BxKt
27.RxRP BxR
28.B-K5 R-B3
29.BxR K-Kt
30.Q-Kt7

I'm getting an illegal move on Blacks third move. Any help in resolving this will be very greatly appreciated.

May-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Graham1973> I don't know what causing your problem. Possibly the excessive notation (such as 3.KB-QB4 KB-QB4, which is normally written as 3.B-B4 B-B4) is throwing things off.

At any rate, here is the entire score in algebraic:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.d4 exd4 7.0-0 dxc3 8.Qb3 Qf6 9.e5 Qg6 10.Nxc3 Nge7 11.Ba3 0-0 12.Nd5 Nxd5 13.Bxd5 d6 14.exd6 cxd6 15.Rad1 Bc7 16.Rfe1 Nd8 17.Re7 Ne6 18.Bxe6 Bxe6 19.Qxb7 Bb6 20.Bxd6 Bh3 21.Ne5 Bxf2+ 22.Kxf2 Qc2+ 23.Kg3 Qxd1 24.Rxf7 Bf5 25.Rxg7+ Kh8 26.Ng6+ Bxg6 27.Rxh7+ Bxh7 28.Be5+ Rf6 29.Bxf6+ Kg8 30.Qg7# 1-0

Most of the game is in this database: Mackenzie vs E Delmar, 1879. The last two moves are omitted for some reason. Perhaps a source was used which cut off at move 28, saying "And White mates in two."

May-09-13  Graham1973: <Phony Benoni> Thanks for clearing that up. It might be worth updating the game on the database to better reflect the circumstances under which it was played, as I was actually able to retrieve the date & location from the article I found.

I've found a few references to these games (Though none with really well known players other than this one.) dating from around the same time period (Late 1870s, early 1880s) during which they seem to have been popular.

I wish I could figure out who did the annotations.

May-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Graham1973> If you've got an exact date, I can change that; just let me have the information. The location and the two missing moves would have to be corrected through the correction slip process.
May-09-13  Graham1973: The correct date is 1879.04.15. I've also taken the step of submitting an updated pgn file via the correction process. I left out the annotations as no author is given.
May-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Graham1973> I've changed the date, but I did a little further checking trying to track down the annotations and found some conflicts in the date. The Newark Sunday Call for April 20, 1879, puts the exhibition on Wednesday, April 16:

http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

The New York Sun for Sunday, April 13, also puts the performance on Wednesday.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/l...

(Under the headline "Footlight Flashes".)

May-09-13  Graham1973: I think you may be right, I just used a calendar program and the 15th of April is a Tuesday. I based my date on the Globe-Herald article which gave the date as "...Wednesday evening, 15th ultimo...".

Apparently the game was also covered by the New York Herald, but the issues on the Chess Archeology site only go as far back as 1889.

May-09-13  Graham1973: <Phony Benoni>When the fully updated version is uploaded, it might be best to change the date to 1879.04.16.
May-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Graham1973> I've made the date change. The Gametype should be changed to "Exhibition" as well.

Another site for searching the old New York papers is http://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html

The searching interface is hard to get used to, but at least there is one. Here's the relevant pages from New York Herald for April 15 and April 16 (PDF files):

http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%...

http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%...

And here is the problem mentioned, "Atalanta, the fleet-footed queen" by Eugene B. Cook:


click for larger view

White mates in 11: <1.Bd4+ Kxd4 2.Qg7+ Qe5 3.Qxa7+ Ke4 4.Qe3+ Kf5 5.Qg5+ Ke4 6.f3+ Kd4 7.Qg1+ Qe3 8.Qg7+ Kc5 9.Qc7+ Kd4 10.Qb6+ Ke5 11.Qf6#>

May-09-13  Graham1973: <Phony Benoni> Thanks.
May-10-13  Graham1973: <Phony Benoni>I've added a better summary of the event to the Mackenzie-Delmar 1879 page.

Mackenzie vs E Delmar, 1879

May-12-13  Graham1973: I've found another Mackenzie-Delmar exhibition match with living chess pieces (Drawn) in the Hartford Weekly Times of 15/03/1883.

http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

Not sure whether to upload or not although the score was also given in the St Louis Globe-Democrat in the edition of the 25/03/1883.

May-12-13  Graham1973: Thought I'd try transcribing the results from the 1883 Mackenzie-Delamar Exhibition match and found a discrepancy in the scores between the two accounts I've uncovered so far.

The discrepancy in the endgame moves is as follows.

(St Louis Globe-Democrat)
http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

1. P-K4 P-K4
2. P-Q4 PxP
3. QxP QKt-B3
4. Q-K3 B-Kt5
5. B-Q2 Q-B3
6. QKt-B3 Kt-Q5
7. O-O Kt-K2
8. Qkt-Q5 KtxKt
9. P-Kt B-K2
10. B-B3 Kt-B4
11. Q-K Q-Kt4
12. K-Kt O-O
13. Kt-KB3 Q-R4
14. P-KKt4 QxP
15. R-Kt QxKt
16. B-Kt2 Q-R
17. B-B3 QxB
18. R-Q3 Q-B5
19. QxB KtxQ
20. RxP K-R
21. RxBP K-Kt
22. R-Kt7 K-R
23. R-R3 P-KR3
24. R-Kt6 K-R2
25. R-Kt7 K-R
26. R-Kt6 Drawn.

(Hartford Weekly Times)

http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

18. ...
19. QxB KtxQ
20. RxP K-R
21. R-Kt7 K-Kt
22. R-KR3 P-KR3
23. R-KKt6 K-K2
24. R-KKt7 K-Kt

...and drawn in two moves.

May-13-13  Graham1973: Several games by Mackenzie from the 1860s can be found in this online article.

http://www.chessarch.com/archive/00...

May-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  thomastonk: From his cg biography: "In 1883, he lost a match to Wilhelm Steinitz in New York (+1-3=2)."

From the BCM, 1883, p. 105: "The program included a series of six game (not to be called a match) with Captain Mackenzie - score at finish, Steinitz 3 ; Mackenzie 1 ; drawn 2 - (the prizes being 15 dols. per game to the winner, 5 dols. to the loser),...".

May-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: <thomastonk> Here is that match.

Game Collection: 1883 Steinitz - Mackenzie Match

May-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  thomastonk: <TheFocus> Thanks. Maybe I have to learn something here.

My intention was to emphasize that in 1883 there has been a distinction between a match and a series of games. That's the way I interpret "(not to be called a match)". If I am wrong here, I would like to know that, of course.

Regarding this 6 games, I found also American newspapers that spoke only about a series of games. The program, to which the BCM refers, was that of Steinitz' engagement at the Manhattan Chess Club, which lasted 10 days and included blindfold and simultaneous exhibitions as well as other individual games. The general description of the conditions of such an engagement were described in the "Cleveland Herald", March 25, 1883: "The terms demanded by Herr Steinitz, the chess champion, are $200 for an engagement, and, in addition, the winner of each game the champion plays shall receive $15 and the loser $5. The St.Louis Chess Club voted a visit from Mr Steinitz too expensive a luxury, and his offer has been declined." That is the complete text there.

May-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: <thomas> Not having seen your sources, I took it to be a match from Steinit's bio. That is how it was listed. Forgot who the compiler was. That bio is at home.

I would list it as a series. I will add your sources to my collection.

May-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: <thomastonk> Thank you for that clarification. I added the following to my collection:

<thomastonk> pointed out that these games may not be considered a match: From the BCM, 1883, p. 105: <"The program included a series of six game (not to be called a match) with Captain Mackenzie - score at finish, Steinitz 3 ; Mackenzie 1 ; drawn 2 - (the prizes being 15 dols. per game to the winner, 5 dols. to the loser).>

<thomastonk> adds: Regarding this 6 games, I found also American newspapers that spoke only about a series of games. The program, to which the BCM refers, was that of Steinitz' engagement at the Manhattan Chess Club, which lasted 10 days and included blindfold and simultaneous exhibitions as well as other individual games. The general description of the conditions of such an engagement were described in the "Cleveland Herald", March 25, 1883: "The terms demanded by Herr Steinitz, the chess champion, are $200 for an engagement, and, in addition, the winner of each game the champion plays shall receive $15 and the loser $5. The St.Louis Chess Club voted a visit from Mr Steinitz too expensive a luxury, and his offer has been declined."

May-18-13  Graham1973: I've found an 1878 game between Mackenzie and Ware with extensive notations by Steinitz at the Jack O'Keefe project.

http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

Does anyone think this one might be worthy of inclusion?

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